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quibble

Choosing between uMontréal/McGill?

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Bonjour,

Has anyone here ever had to choose between uMontréal or McGill? 
J'ai l'intention de travailler soit à Montréal, soit à Ottawa (pour le gouvernement, probablement). J'ai déjà fait un bac à McGill. 

I appreciate any insight and feel free to DM me! 

Merci à l'avance! (p.s. I have read all the threads on this forum comparing the two; though they are a bit dated and would like some fresher thoughts). 

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If you consider working in Ottawa, go to McGill without any doubt! You get a dual degree with both Civil and common law + c'est bilingue :)

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McGill is a dual degree so I'd say McGill ! I've been to both schools and it really depends how important the ambiance and vibe is for you. They're both great law schools, but McGill you'll get to do law in both languages and you'll have a dual degree (which are two bonus components for Ottawa). However, I think people at  UDM in general are friendlier then McGill and I don't like the way McGill teaches, it does not prepare you for the real world as much 

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1 hour ago, quibble said:

Bonjour,

Has anyone here ever had to choose between uMontréal or McGill? 
J'ai l'intention de travailler soit à Montréal, soit à Ottawa (pour le gouvernement, probablement). J'ai déjà fait un bac à McGill. 

I appreciate any insight and feel free to DM me! 

Merci à l'avance! (p.s. I have read all the threads on this forum comparing the two; though they are a bit dated and would like some fresher thoughts). 

****i should i add I would pursue the JD at uMontréal as well.

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Posted (edited)

You can get both degrees at both schools within the same (or similar) timeframe. With a Bachelor under your belt already, you'll be able to theoretically do the LL.B./J.D. at UdeM in 3 years. McGill, students typically decide if they want to do the degrees in 3, 3.5 or 4 years.

In any case, McGill is hands down the school that will open you the most doors (and this is coming from an UdeM graduate). It's one of (if not) the best law schools in the country, and rivals many top tier U.S. schools as well.

That being said, UdeM is an excellent school if you plan on practicing in Quebec, and it can still open doors nearby, including Ottawa. The ambiance is different, as is the approach to teaching. UdeM will better prepare you for the Quebec Bar and takes a more problem-solving and pragmatic approach to teaching and testing, while McGill takes a more philosophical and high-level approach (i.e., you won't be citing too many civil code articles to tell John Doe how to defend himself from a lawsuit due to someone slipping on ice in his driveway).

McGill also has a more varied student population, and a more tight-knit community (stemming a lot from the lesser amount of students they enroll). UdeM's non-CEGEP student population has however grown significantly in the last years and I (holding a Bachelor at the time of my law studies there as well) very much enjoyed the dynamics, though the overall ambiance is definitely "younger". McGill's grading curve is also much more challenging/tight. For instance, a 3.7 (A-) at UdeM is what top big law firms tend to consider as competitive, while it's more around the 3.0 (B) mark at McGill.

Bref, it's very hard to say no to McGill, and typically people tend not to turn it down unless they have a clear reason to. Although, as long as you apply yourself and score relatively well with respect to the grading curve, you can't really make a "wrong" decision per se here.

Cheers!

Edited by he4dhuntr
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22 hours ago, Eythalaw said:

If you consider working in Ottawa, go to McGill without any doubt! You get a dual degree with both Civil and common law + c'est bilingue :)

I can actually get a JD at uMontréal in english, so technically I could still do my studies in a bilingual fashion. :) 

22 hours ago, Lawstudent2410 said:

McGill is a dual degree so I'd say McGill ! I've been to both schools and it really depends how important the ambiance and vibe is for you. They're both great law schools, but McGill you'll get to do law in both languages and you'll have a dual degree (which are two bonus components for Ottawa). However, I think people at  UDM in general are friendlier then McGill and I don't like the way McGill teaches, it does not prepare you for the real world as much 

Thanks for your input, will take your thoughts into consideration. 

 

8 hours ago, he4dhuntr said:

You can get both degrees at both schools within the same (or similar) timeframe. With a Bachelor under your belt already, you'll be able to theoretically do the LL.B./J.D. at UdeM in 3 years. McGill, students typically decide if they want to do the degrees in 3, 3.5 or 4 years.

In any case, McGill is hands down the school that will open you the most doors (and this is coming from an UdeM graduate). It's one of (if not) the best law schools in the country, and rivals many top tier U.S. schools as well.

That being said, UdeM is an excellent school if you plan on practicing in Quebec, and it can still open doors nearby, including Ottawa. The ambiance is different, as is the approach to teaching. UdeM will better prepare you for the Quebec Bar and takes a more problem-solving and pragmatic approach to teaching and testing, while McGill takes a more philosophical and high-level approach (i.e., you won't be citing too many civil code articles to tell John Doe how to defend himself from a lawsuit due to someone slipping on ice in his driveway).

McGill also has a more varied student population, and a more tight-knit community (stemming a lot from the lesser amount of students they enroll). UdeM's non-CEGEP student population has however grown significantly in the last years and I (holding a Bachelor at the time of my law studies there as well) very much enjoyed the dynamics, though the overall ambiance is definitely "younger". McGill's grading curve is also much more challenging/tight. For instance, a 3.7 (A-) at UdeM is what top big law firms tend to consider as competitive, while it's more around the 3.0 (B) mark at McGill.

Bref, it's very hard to say no to McGill, and typically people tend not to turn it down unless they have a clear reason to. Although, as long as you apply yourself and score relatively well with respect to the grading curve, you can't really make a "wrong" decision per se here.

Cheers!

Thanks so much your insightful post! 

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9 hours ago, he4dhuntr said:

You can get both degrees at both schools within the same (or similar) timeframe. With a Bachelor under your belt already, you'll be able to theoretically do the LL.B./J.D. at UdeM in 3 years. McGill, students typically decide if they want to do the degrees in 3, 3.5 or 4 years.

In any case, McGill is hands down the school that will open you the most doors (and this is coming from an UdeM graduate). It's one of (if not) the best law schools in the country, and rivals many top tier U.S. schools as well.

That being said, UdeM is an excellent school if you plan on practicing in Quebec, and it can still open doors nearby, including Ottawa. The ambiance is different, as is the approach to teaching. UdeM will better prepare you for the Quebec Bar and takes a more problem-solving and pragmatic approach to teaching and testing, while McGill takes a more philosophical and high-level approach (i.e., you won't be citing too many civil code articles to tell John Doe how to defend himself from a lawsuit due to someone slipping on ice in his driveway).

McGill also has a more varied student population, and a more tight-knit community (stemming a lot from the lesser amount of students they enroll). UdeM's non-CEGEP student population has however grown significantly in the last years and I (holding a Bachelor at the time of my law studies there as well) very much enjoyed the dynamics, though the overall ambiance is definitely "younger". McGill's grading curve is also much more challenging/tight. For instance, a 3.7 (A-) at UdeM is what top big law firms tend to consider as competitive, while it's more around the 3.0 (B) mark at McGill.

Bref, it's very hard to say no to McGill, and typically people tend not to turn it down unless they have a clear reason to. Although, as long as you apply yourself and score relatively well with respect to the grading curve, you can't really make a "wrong" decision per se here.

Cheers!

Bonjour, comment faire le JD en même temps que le bacc ? Je viens d’être accepté et l’idée m’intéresse. Merci

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2 hours ago, kleopatre said:

Bonjour, comment faire le JD en même temps que le bacc ? Je viens d’être accepté et l’idée m’intéresse. Merci

Tu dois avoir déjà complété un bac au préalable pour pouvoir faire le JD en même temps que le LLB. Si je me souviens bien, si tu es déjà titulaire d’un autre bac, tu fais la demande pour le JD en deuxième année, puis tu fais le JD à la troisième année du bac! Sinon, si tu n’as pas un autre bac, tu peux compléter un JD après ton LLB (environ une trentaine de crédits).

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1 hour ago, Mcpel said:

Tu dois avoir déjà complété un bac au préalable pour pouvoir faire le JD en même temps que le LLB. Si je me souviens bien, si tu es déjà titulaire d’un autre bac, tu fais la demande pour le JD en deuxième année, puis tu fais le JD à la troisième année du bac! Sinon, si tu n’as pas un autre bac, tu peux compléter un JD après ton LLB (environ une trentaine de crédits).

D’accord, moi présentement avant d’entamer le BAC en droit cet automne, je suis en train de terminer un BAC en science politique. C’est  valable pour faire un JD en deuxième année si je comprends bien ?

Et est-ce que cette option t’ouvre + de portes après? 

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On 4/16/2021 at 9:25 PM, kleopatre said:

D’accord, moi présentement avant d’entamer le BAC en droit cet automne, je suis en train de terminer un BAC en science politique. C’est  valable pour faire un JD en deuxième année si je comprends bien ?

Et est-ce que cette option t’ouvre + de portes après? 

Oui ça ouvre théoriquement plus de portes, mais rien de matériel si tu ne penses pas travailler ailleurs. Avoir plus de diplômes c'est rarement négatif comme effet ;)

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On 4/16/2021 at 7:37 PM, Mcpel said:

Tu dois avoir déjà complété un bac au préalable pour pouvoir faire le JD en même temps que le LLB. Si je me souviens bien, si tu es déjà titulaire d’un autre bac, tu fais la demande pour le JD en deuxième année, puis tu fais le JD à la troisième année du bac! Sinon, si tu n’as pas un autre bac, tu peux compléter un JD après ton LLB (environ une trentaine de crédits).

Ah wow je n'avais même pas pensé à ça! Est-ce que tu connais des personnes qui l'ont fait? Ça doit être assez demandant de faire un bac en même temps qu'un DESS mais au moins ça sauverais du temps pour ceux qui ont déjà un bac en main :) 

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8 minutes ago, dnatari said:

Ah wow je n'avais même pas pensé à ça! Est-ce que tu connais des personnes qui l'ont fait? Ça doit être assez demandant de faire un bac en même temps qu'un DESS mais au moins ça sauverais du temps pour ceux qui ont déjà un bac en main :) 

Je connais quelqu'un qui l'a fait et ça donne des sessions assez chargées! Elle l'avait plus fait par opportunité, mais c'est certains que ça peut être intéressant d'avoir les deux. Il y a plus d'info sur le programme combiné ici: https://droit.umontreal.ca/fileadmin/droit/documents/PDF/programmes_combines/LLB_JD_etudessuperieures.pdf 😊

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16 hours ago, dnatari said:

Ah wow je n'avais même pas pensé à ça! Est-ce que tu connais des personnes qui l'ont fait? Ça doit être assez demandant de faire un bac en même temps qu'un DESS mais au moins ça sauverais du temps pour ceux qui ont déjà un bac en main :) 

Je l'ai fait. Ça ne change pas énormément ton parcours, mis à part quelques cours de plus l'été (c'est cette partie qui a été demandante pour moi : 2 cours, 4 soirs par semaine pendant la moitié de l'été après le travail). Sinon, ça ne fait que limiter tes choix de cours au Bac, car ta dernière (3e) année sera le J.D.

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9 minutes ago, he4dhuntr said:

Je l'ai fait. Ça ne change pas énormément ton parcours, mis à part quelques cours de plus l'été (c'est cette partie qui a été demandante pour moi : 2 cours, 4 soirs par semaine pendant la moitié de l'été après le travail). Sinon, ça ne fait que limiter tes choix de cours au Bac, car ta dernière (3e) année sera le J.D.

Quel a été exactement le processus durant ton bac ? Combien de cours as-tu pris ?

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6 hours ago, kleopatre said:

Quel a été exactement le processus durant ton bac ? Combien de cours as-tu pris ?

Maximum de cours (5 par session?) + 2 chaque été. Si je me souviens bien (ça fait longtemps maintenant). Dans le temps, il y avait un exemple du processus sur le site de la faculté.

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