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June LSAT Flex vs. August 4 section LSAT

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Posted (edited)

Hey guys,

Would it be viable for me to only study for the LSAT for 1.5 months and rush to do it in June 2021? June will be the last administration of the 3 section Flex and released data shows that on the Flex exam the number of people scoring over 170 doubled from when it was just the regular exam. In August, it'll still be online but there'll be an added experimental section so it'll require somewhat more stamina. I also suspect that they're specifically aiming to deflate scores from August onwards.

Is the added "easiness" of only doing 3 sections worth it for me to only prep 1 month? I also plan to work this summer.

ETA: I took the June 2007 diagnostic last August and scored 158

 

Edited by DonaldTrump

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A 158 is a pretty good timed diagnostic score and definitely an encouraging sign. If you're starting completely from scratch, though, I'd say 1.5 months is a little rushed. Everyone is different, but for me it took time for some of the concepts to become fully ingrained, even if I got through the study material quickly. If you're planning on doing a study program (I'd highly recommend 7sage), you'll need more than a month and a half, especially if you're working full time. 

It also depends on where you're weakest. If it's logic games - by far the most "learnable" section - then a month and a half to focus on that may be enough. If it's the more fundamental logical reasoning questions or reading comp that you need to work on, those usually take a bit more time.

You can play it by ear, too. Determine whether the progress you've made by the June registration deadline warrants an early write, and just anticipate having to possibly rewrite in August as well. Unless you're strapped for cash, or unless you're applying to one of the few Canadian schools that averages LSAT scores, there's no harm in writing it twice. 

 

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Its going to largely depend on what your target score is and what you are weak in based off the diagnostic (as Electricity mentioned LG is the most learnable section). If you are targeting a 170+, I'd say a one month prep is not enough. If you are looking for mid 160s, then yeah one month will likely be enough. I would recommend 7sage, and with one month of prep you'll need to make some strategic decisions, ie, drill LG until you are 0/-1 and pick several of the weak LR questions to improve on, do a couple practice RC but largely accept your score is your score there.

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, HarryCrane said:

If you are targeting a 170+, I'd say a one month prep is not enough. If you are looking for mid 160s, then yeah one month will likely be enough.

Yeah I'm targeting 170+ which is ironically why I'm considering rushing for the June exam in the first place - apparently it's much, much easier to score 170+ on the Flex as opposed to the regular exam. I'm just weighing whether it'll be more likely that I score 170+ on a short/easy exam with only 1 month of study as opposed to having 3.5 months and doing it in August but no longer having the supposed benefits of the Flex. At least they're not going back to the 5 section version of the LSAT, though!

Edited by DonaldTrump

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Posted (edited)

I don't think the 'advantages' gleaned by current flex (one less section) will counteract the lack of prep personally.

https://7sage.com/the-three-worst-lsat-mistakes/ See #1. It would be one thing if your diag was 165 or something but to jump 12 points in 1 month is just not something very feasible. The LSAT is not a test you can cram for. If you game at all, it takes time to learn the 'meta' of the test so to speak for each section. There are some things that pretty much always happen and are almost always tested (ie. A->B, B->C, tf. A->C) and the pattern recognition, how to not just organize pieces in certain orders/categories but also how to EFFICIENTLY do it, see what they tend to look for, learn the nuances of different question types, etc... you're fighting a real uphill battle with just one month and potentially just wasting finite materials trying to rush it. 

Have you considered an alternative explanation also for why there are more high scores: that the average person 1) has more time to study as a result of the pandemic and 2) there are also more people taking the test? 

Ultimately, our current cycle is done. The next cycle won't be due until Oct/Nov. Any gains you may or may not make with a 3 section test will be overcome by proper, nuanced preparation where you build up your foundations properly. Don't try to take a shortcut with this test, it will bite you in the ass lol. 

EDIT: FYI, my diagnostic was 159 and it took me 4 months of pretty hardcore studying (the month before my test, I did 2 PTs a week with review, and multiple assorted sections of LG, RC, LR by themselves, met with a study buddy twice a week and would talk with her for HOURS (one time we started at 8pm and ended at 12am) to start PTing in the 170s by the end, and got 168 at the end even after the immense amount of work I put in (there were some extenuating circumstances, but acts of God are acts of God). 

You may be smarter than me, but just to put it into perspective...

Edited by goodisgood
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Posted (edited)

I took the flex in august of last year then retook in November. I scored WAY lower than my PTs in august and I honestly think it's because of burnout. When I retook in November I didn't study as hard or in the same way because I already "knew the material". All I did was about 1hr per day to keep my skills fresh. I managed to do decently on my rewrite (164).

The reason I mention this is because with a month and a half of studying it's likely that you're going to have to put in quite a few hours of intense studying to grasp the LSAT concepts enough to reach a 170, which can lead to burnout. If you take more months to study you can divide your study time into a more manageable and reasonable schedule which I think will benefit you in the long run.

Basically, sure you can do it if you're willing to put in the hours and the work. However be aware that it's likely you'll burn yourself out, which can negatively impact your performance.

Edited by nocturnalrelativism
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Posted (edited)

I would say it is not worth it. Stamina won't help if you aren't prepared. There were also  a lot more people who took the LSAT flex so I think the ease of having only 3 sections wasn't the only factor that increased the number of high scorers.

Also it can only be compared to the old LSAT that had 5 sections which is even more challenging. You also get a break in the new LSAT, you don't get a break on the FLEX, so that will help with the fatigue. You could also just take it twice, the only school that averaged your scores no longer does. 

Edited by legallybrunette3
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, goodisgood said:

Don't try to take a shortcut with this test, it will bite you in the ass lol. 

16 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

I would say it is not worth it

I thought about it some more and I've decided that I'm 100% going to be taking the August LSAT. You guys are right, there's no way that I'm gonna stake everything on a difficult exam with only 1 month to study.

However, would it be worth it for me to take the June LSAT anyways before taking it in August as well as a test run, or as a kind of shot in the dark where I just try my luck? I am aware that it will likely be a terrible waste of $200, but I feel a lot better psychologically about having 2 chances at the test instead of only one. Is there anything to be gained from doing that?

Edited by DonaldTrump

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2 minutes ago, DonaldTrump said:

I thought about it some more and I've decided that I'm 100% going to be taking the August LSAT. You guys are right, there's no way that I'm gonna stake everything on a difficult exam with only 1 month to study.

However, would it be worth it for me to take the June LSAT anyways before taking it in August as well as a test run, or as a kind of shot in the dark where I just try my luck? I am aware that it will likely be a terrible waste of $200, but I feel a lot better psychologically about having 2 chances at the test instead of only one. Is there anything to be gained from doing that?

I would say start studying ASAP and take another timed PT online before the deadline to register. Try to simulate actual testing conditions and see how you do. If you do ok on it I don't see why not! 3 is better than 4. 

 

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You know yourself best Donald. If you think the mental pressure psychologically is better for you, go for it if you have $200 to work with. Do keep in mind you wouldn't even see your score until July... and what happens if you get it back and it's a shitty score? Is that more pressure or less pressure? 

If you're doing proper PTs, you should be getting a pretty good gauge of where you're at IMO. But again, you know your brain and how you deal with stress best. Just remember to be brutally honest with your PTing. You need to have the best possible idea of where you're at and the best way is going to be consistent, proper simulations. 

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Just to offer a different perspective, I actually found that knowing I could take the LSAT again was a disadvantage. When I was writing it the first time I got stressed halfway through and instead of pushing through I just fell into the mentality of being like "it's fine whatever I'll just retake it in November". This made it so I basically mentally gave up instead of ignoring those thoughts and pushing through. When I retook the LSAT the second time I couldn't allow myself to think like that because there was no other chance to take it again. So in my opinion, if you're going to take the LSAT at a later date I don't know how much taking it earlier as a trial run would benefit you. But who knows maybe you'll actually get a good score on that first write! Some people excel even with limited studying

just some food for thought, obviously it depends on how you operate and deal with stress, studying, and exams. also i was burned out and tired on my first LSAT lol so take this with a grain of salt

 

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2 hours ago, nocturnalrelativism said:

also i was burned out and tired on my first LSAT lol so take this with a grain of salt

Thanks for bringing this up - I definitely didn't think about the potential of getting burned out / discouraged by doing two lsats in quick succession. I asked my friend (who is neither a law student nor an applicant) about this and he kind of persuaded me that just writing both exams would be a good choice, but now I'm heavily reconsidering 🙂

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