Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
maybemaybe

Questions for applicants who got in after their third year of undergrad

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, maybemaybe said:

Thank you, I think I will try a free diagnostic. Do you have a recommendation for study time/hours to study?

 

1 hour ago, TheMidnightOil said:

3. Follow whatever study plans come with the books/services. The Trainer comes with several, 7sage should come with a few as well.

Also check out the LSAT forum here for lots of advice!

Edited by LawBlaw2019
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, maybemaybe said:

Thank you, I think I will try a free diagnostic. Do you have a recommendation for study time/hours to study?

The LSAT Trainer (which I recommend [well, for LR and RC]) comes with a few study planners with suggested hours per week / total weeks to complete the book along with practice drills and tests. I think there are 4, 8, 12, and 16 week planners on the website (I recommend doing at least 3 months of prep unless you're an LSAT natural). Generally, 3-6 months should be enough time to get a decent score, and maybe 1+ year if you need a really high score (which even then isn't a guarantee). 

Also check the /r/LSAT subreddit's sidebar for more resources.

Edited by TheMidnightOil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, maybemaybe said:

do you mean you are currently in your third year or that you have completed 3 years and are in the fourth year of your degree? If its the former, I'm pretty sure they would treat you differently

I am currently in my third year! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Surgence said:

I am currently in my third year! 

did you do extra classes to reach 90 credits by the end of first semester? Maybe then thats why you got treated as a fourth year, I just thought you would not get in from your lsat because on the website it says people with 60-89 credits need at least a 90th percentile lsat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, maybemaybe said:

did you do extra classes to reach 90 credits by the end of first semester? Maybe then thats why you got treated as a fourth year, I just thought you would not get in from your lsat because on the website it says people with 60-89 credits need at least a 90th percentile lsat

Those are two-year applicants, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/10/2021 at 11:04 PM, TheMidnightOil said:

I thought that they make no distinction between 3- and 4-year admits? It's the 2-years that get special scrutiny.

2 years as in did 3 years of undergrad and didn't complete their fourth year before going to law school? Because thats what I meant by 2 year applicant. And then three year would be someone currently in their last year of their degree

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, maybemaybe said:

2 years as in did 3 years of undergrad and didn't complete their fourth year before going to law school? Because thats what I meant by 2 year applicant. And then three year would be someone currently in their last year of their degree

I think three-year applicants are those between 60-89 (inclusive) credits before the deadline -- they have two years completed, and are currently in their third year.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/17/2021 at 2:45 PM, TheMidnightOil said:

I think three-year applicants are those between 60-89 (inclusive) credits before the deadline -- they have two years completed, and are currently in their third year.

whats interesting is that the website says that 2 year admits need a minimum 90th percentile lsat and yet surgence got in with 78th percentile although their gpa is really high. So the personal statement probably makes a big difference

  • Confused 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I think you are slightly confused maybemaybe, so I can clear this up for you: 

2 year applicants are those that are in their second year of their undergrad degree (will have 60-89 completed credits) by the time they enter law school and they are the ones who require exceptional stats (3.7 and 90th percentile); see excerpt from https://apps.admissions.ualberta.ca/programs/la/la020 ("There is no direct entry from high school into the Juris Doctor program (JD). Exceptional students may be admitted to the program after completing two years of university study with a minimum GPA of 3.7 and 90th percentile Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. All other students must have completed at least the first three years of a degree before being admitted to the JD."). This applies when you apply in your second year of undergrad. 

3rd year applicants are those that are in their 3rd year of university and who will have 90 or more credits by the time they enter law school and they are treated the same as those with degrees. Excerpt from same website " All other students must have completed at least the first three years of a degree before being admitted to the JD." This applies when you apply in your third year of undergrad. 

Hope this clears everything up! 

Edited by Surgence
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the major confusion is around when applicants are considered "admitted". Are you admitted when you get your acceptance letter or in September? If it's when you get your letter, a 3rd year would not have the 90 credits required for a full application.

I emailed admissions early in the process and was told that while I would have 90 credits completed by May I did not have 90 credits on my application when they would be assessing it and would be placed in the 2-year category. Now, maybe they misunderstood my question but the answer seemed pretty definitive that while I was in my third year I was still considered a second year applicant because I only had 75 credits for them to assess in January. But, based on U of A's admissions practices this cycle I think it's fair to say that they could've changed it mid-cycle without informing anyone.

Honestly, I wouldn't waste too much time worrying about this. Your best bet to get into law school with or without a degree is to have as high a GPA as possible and score as high as you can on the LSAT.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2021 at 11:38 PM, Surgence said:

I think you are slightly confused maybemaybe, so I can clear this up for you: 

2 year applicants are those that are in their second year of their undergrad degree (will have 60-89 completed credits) by the time they enter law school and they are the ones who require exceptional stats (3.7 and 90th percentile); see excerpt from https://apps.admissions.ualberta.ca/programs/la/la020 ("There is no direct entry from high school into the Juris Doctor program (JD). Exceptional students may be admitted to the program after completing two years of university study with a minimum GPA of 3.7 and 90th percentile Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. All other students must have completed at least the first three years of a degree before being admitted to the JD."). This applies when you apply in your second year of undergrad. 

3rd year applicants are those that are in their 3rd year of university and who will have 90 or more credits by the time they enter law school and they are treated the same as those with degrees. Excerpt from same website " All other students must have completed at least the first three years of a degree before being admitted to the JD." This applies when you apply in your third year of undergrad. 

Hope this clears everything up! 

Yeah who knows at this point. HotDiggity might be right that they changed some of their policies. I'm interpreting it as people in their third year who were accepted without a degree would be considered 2 year applicants because here https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u9luOkViBOZE9aNENLN3hRaWxnQmQtM212UEd5SW1GVDBN/view they specifically list the number of third years who got accepted which leads me to believe that they are considered their own category otherwise why would they list it? And then when it says that students need to have at least the first three years of a degree to be admitted, I interpret that as gain acceptance. But judging by your acceptance with less than 90th percentile LSAT, I think yes, you are probably right. 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, maybemaybe said:

Yeah who knows at this point. HotDiggity might be right that they changed some of their policies. I'm interpreting it as people in their third year who were accepted without a degree would be considered 2 year applicants because here https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u9luOkViBOZE9aNENLN3hRaWxnQmQtM212UEd5SW1GVDBN/view they specifically list the number of third years who got accepted which leads me to believe that they are considered their own category otherwise why would they list it? And then when it says that students need to have at least the first three years of a degree to be admitted, I interpret that as gain acceptance. But judging by your acceptance with less than 90th percentile LSAT, I think yes, you are probably right. 

3rd year means you're in your 3rd year when you apply. 

2nd year means you're in your 2nd year when you apply. 

It doesn't need interpretation. @Surgence is a 3rd year, because of how many courses they completed when they applied.  

If you want to apply as a 2nd year, you will need a 90th percentile LSAT. 

Edited by legallybrunette3
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

3rd year means you're in your 3rd year when you apply. 

2nd year means you're in your 2nd year when you apply. 

It doesn't need interpretation. @Surgence is a 3rd year, because of how many courses they completed when they applied.  

If you want to apply as a 2nd year, you will need a 90th percentile LSAT. 

I agree that this would make sense, but from what I was told by two different admissions staff 3rd year means you've completed 3 years. Again, maybe it changed or they misunderstood but that is almost verbatim what I was told in October.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, HotDiggity said:

I agree that this would make sense, but from what I was told by two different admissions staff 3rd year means you've completed 3 years. Again, maybe it changed or they misunderstood but that is almost verbatim what I was told in October.

Yes you need 3 years to be a 3rd year applicant, you can't just bounce after your first semester of your 3rd year once you apply. They'll expect you to complete it. You have to hit 90 credits to be a 3rd year applicant. 

Edited by legallybrunette3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/20/2021 at 6:59 PM, HotDiggity said:

I agree that this would make sense, but from what I was told by two different admissions staff 3rd year means you've completed 3 years. Again, maybe it changed or they misunderstood but that is almost verbatim what I was told in October.

Yeah this was my understanding too, I emailed them explicitly stating that if I applied next cycle I would have 75 credits by the end of the fall. They said I would be a regular applicant then. I was surprised by that honestly, I wish it was a bit more clear on their website

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...