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I'm planning on taking no courses during the fall term to exclusively study for the LSAT in November, and possibly re-write again in January 2022. I work full time and I have to submit my days off request now. I'm trying to figure out what the best strategy is. Do I take a week of right before the test for lots of extra revision? Or do I spread out days evenly throughout? Or take a week off in the middle? I have about 7 working days to use. 

I'm planning on doing mostly self-study and getting a private tutor. Are most tutors available in the evenings and weekends? Or should I plan to be available during the work day?

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Posted (edited)

I would definitely suggest spreading the days off throughout, it's better to do a PT and figure out your weaknesses and then review questions of that type before you take the next PT. You wouldn't be able to do that same level of analysis in one week. 

I don't have any experience with tutors but you'll for sure be able to find one to work with you at any time, there are no shortages of tutors, for what they charge they'd probably come to your house at night and read you LSAT bibles in bed to sleep. The key is finding a good one. If I were to not go the self-study route, I'd probably choose a class instead of a tutor, but others might have more advice on this. 

What is your diagnostic score? 

Edited by legallybrunette3

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Posted (edited)

I would recommend maybe taking 2 or 3 days off prior to your test. Not for the purposes of studying because it will be too late for that, but perhaps do something fun and relaxing to take your mind off the test and reset. 

I personally found that self-studying and figuring out the test on my own was the best way to actually learn and practice the test over and over again. This was also the MOST flexible way to manage my time/balance other commitments because I didn't have to coordinate with a tutor or a scheduled class. However, I would assume that you could find a personal tutor that would accommodate your schedule. 

Edited by golfguy
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@legallybrunette3 Haha! Brilliant. Thank you! 

I honestly haven't taken a diagnostic yet because I know as soon as I do I'll get completely sucked into LSAT land and not focus on my current courses/GPA at all. I'm trying to compartmentalize a bit so I don't totally sacrifice one for the other.

@golfguy Awesome, thank you! That's reassuring. 

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Your situation is very similar to my prior experience, so thought I would add my two cents. Personally, I was able to study effectively in the evenings and on weekends while working full time, and didn't need to take any time off for the LSAT.

However, echoing what has been said above, I recommend taking time off to relax in advance of the test. This past November, I wrote my test on a Wednesday, but took the Monday and Tuesday prior as vacation time. I avoided looking at anything LSAT related on these days, but instead spent the time seeing friends, going for hikes, etc.

As an aside, what I did end up taking vacation time for was getting my applications together. I found it was specifically helpful to have put a couple days aside to make sure I was really happy with my PS, ensure all documents were submitted, etc. 

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I think you should take a PT test first. If you have a natural aptitude for the course and start in the mid to high 150s, self-studying and then perhaps fine-tuning any concepts you don’t understand with a tutor is the best way to go. But if you find it challenging and it does not come intuitively, a course would probably be a cheaper option than a tutor. I’ve heard great things about Harvard Ready and with everything being online right now, it doesn’t matter where you are. 

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56 minutes ago, blackwidow said:

I think you should take a PT test first. If you have a natural aptitude for the course and start in the mid to high 150s, self-studying and then perhaps fine-tuning any concepts you don’t understand with a tutor is the best way to go. But if you find it challenging and it does not come intuitively, a course would probably be a cheaper option than a tutor. I’ve heard great things about Harvard Ready and with everything being online right now, it doesn’t matter where you are. 

I second that. The resources you seek out depends entirely on your natural aptitude and your desired score. 

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7 hours ago, CTS said:

As an aside, what I did end up taking vacation time for was getting my applications together. I found it was specifically helpful to have put a couple days aside to make sure I was really happy with my PS, ensure all documents were submitted, etc. 

Oh! This is a really great idea, I hadn't thought of that! Thank you! 

 

5 hours ago, golfguy said:

I second that. The resources you seek out depends entirely on your natural aptitude and your desired score. 

This makes good sense. Thank you! 

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I must sound like an ad at this point but I'm here to plug 7Sage again. I loved the structure of having a course outline, but couldn't fork up the bones to find a tutor - 7Sage was perfect for that. It can easily fit into any schedule if you do the core curriculum in small chunks; I usually did 2 hours a night. After the core curriculum and about a month before my test I used days off to do PTs 1-2x a week, with problem sets of questions on the other weeknights.

The teaching style of 7Sage is great overall too. JY knows what he's talking about and knows how to explain each concept/question in a clear way.

Yes x100000 to taking a few days off before the test. You need a break to breatheeee and not fry your brain before D-Day.

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Hey. I worked full time while self-studying. No tutor. I used PowerScore.

PowerScore has a number of schedules, depending on how much time until your test (e.g., 1 mo, 3 mos, etc.). They also have something on their site where you enter your answers from practice tests, and it’ll tell you which kinds of questions you’re struggling with. 

At first, I followed the schedule to get a sense of the LSAT. I then would do at least one practice test/weekend and adjust my studying accordingly to where I was struggling. Of course, certain types of questions are more intuitive than others, so I didn’t want to waste time studying concepts I understood.

I didn’t take any time off to study. Studied textbooks after work, and practice test(s) during the weekend.

I took a total of three days off: two days before the test and obviously one on test day.

On my first day off, I took one last practice test. Scored the lowest of any of my prep tests. That did not help my anxiety going in — I recommend you don’t make that same mistake.

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