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maybemaybe

What is a typical day in your life like?

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Was wondering if any lawyers, articling students, etc. could provide insight on their day to day activities on a work day?

Edited by maybemaybe

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You’ve already asked about this today. And honestly, since what you’re really getting at is how much lawyers tend to work in a day, the question was pretty much answered in the other threads you’ve started recently.

Many lawyers work quite a bit. The answer isn’t going to change depending on how or how many times you ask the question. 

Edited by easttowest
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1 hour ago, easttowest said:

You’ve already asked about this today. And honestly, since what you’re really getting at is how much lawyers tend to work in a day, the question was pretty much answered in the other threads you’ve started recently.

Many lawyers work quite a bit. The answer isn’t going to change depending on how or how many times you ask the question. 

Yeah, I realized I posted my thread in the lawstudents page, not the lawyers and articling students as I had hoped. I'm gonna see if I can delete it from there, that was an accident. My intent with this post was not to see how much lawyers work, it was to gauge the daily responsibilities of lawyers and what they do day to day. Thanks for answering on the other post though

Edited by maybemaybe

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For a more realistic answer (and maybe not as glamorous as you'd be hoping for), as a junior big law associate doing solicitor work:

  • Read/respond to emails - 50% of my time
  • Review corporate searches and various other diligence documents - 20%
  • Draft contracts and other tasks requiring direct legal analysis - 15%
  • Miscellaneous grunt work - remainder 

 

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For a twist on @Grey's response, my workday is as follows.

75% desperately avoiding my emails

5% responding to phone calls as to whether I've checked my emails yet

20% responding to emails

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I spend about 10% of my time responding to emails, and the other 90% scrolling through the old emails in my inbox to see if there's something urgent I haven't responded to yet and surfacing the ones that need to be in the 10%.

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6 AM - wake up and see how many email notifications I have. Shower, eat two avocados, walk my cat, rollerblade to work.

7 30 AM to noon - sort my emails into must respond immediately, must think about, must respond but not immediately, and ignore categories.

Noon to one - typically I am on court over lunch, showing off my suit

1 PM to 4 PM - type responses to my must respond immediately email category and print draft responses for senior pardner to review and send??? 

4 PM to 6 PM - brainstorm email responses to my must think about and must respond but not immediately categories. I use a collage approach and lots of glue.

6 PM - if the mood is right I send some of the better emails produced that day. Then it's home to walk the cat again and sort through my emails a bit more casually while I watch a sitcom. Lights out by 10 PM. No email in the bedroom, wife's rule not mine.

 

 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

eat two avocados, walk my cat, rollerblade to work.

Multiple avocados? Rollerblading?? A cat who walks with you??? 

Madness. Pure and wonderful madness. 

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1 hour ago, Jaggers said:

I spend about 10% of my time responding to emails, and the other 90% scrolling through the old emails in my inbox to see if there's something urgent I haven't responded to yet and surfacing the ones that need to be in the 10%.

surprisingly, thats what most people here have said! I didn't know most of the work was just emails, thats interesting. 

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2 hours ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

6 AM - wake up and see how many email notifications I have. Shower, eat two avocados, walk my cat, rollerblade to work.

7 30 AM to noon - sort my emails into must respond immediately, must think about, must respond but not immediately, and ignore categories.

Noon to one - typically I am on court over lunch, showing off my suit

1 PM to 4 PM - type responses to my must respond immediately email category and print draft responses for senior pardner to review and send??? 

4 PM to 6 PM - brainstorm email responses to my must think about and must respond but not immediately categories. I use a collage approach and lots of glue.

6 PM - if the mood is right I send some of the better emails produced that day. Then it's home to walk the cat again and sort through my emails a bit more casually while I watch a sitcom. Lights out by 10 PM. No email in the bedroom, wife's rule not mine.

 

 

 

 

What is your position? Do you work on emails all day every day?

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My life as an articling student in a ~30 lawyer full-service office:

25% responding to emails/phone calls

50% legal work (legal research, drafting contracts, drafting pleadings, due diligence, etc.)

20% administrative tasks (time entry, file management, organization, photocopying documents, etc.)

5% miscellaneous (grabbing coffee, chatting with colleagues from a safe distance with masks on)

I typically work from 845am to 545pm.

 

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43 minutes ago, canuckfanatic said:

My life as an articling student in a ~30 lawyer full-service office:

25% responding to emails/phone calls

50% legal work (legal research, drafting contracts, drafting pleadings, due diligence, etc.)

20% administrative tasks (time entry, file management, organization, photocopying documents, etc.)

5% miscellaneous (grabbing coffee, chatting with colleagues from a safe distance with masks on)

I typically work from 845am to 545pm.

 

Thanks, how does this change when one becomes associate? What other responsibilities are there and what is the difference in the distribution of work?

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16 minutes ago, maybemaybe said:

Thanks, how does this change when one becomes associate? What other responsibilities are there and what is the difference in the distribution of work?

I don't think it'll change much, at least not right away. Right now as a student I'm hesitant to use legal assistants much. This is mostly due to imposter syndrome (I've been out of law school for less than a year, who am I to boss around someone who's been at the firm for 15 years?)

I expect that as I get more comfortable (and as my hourly rate goes up) I'll rely on assistants more often to handle administrative tasks so I can focus on billables.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, canuckfanatic said:

My life as an articling student in a ~30 lawyer full-service office:

25% responding to emails/phone calls

50% legal work (legal research, drafting contracts, drafting pleadings, due diligence, etc.)

20% administrative tasks (time entry, file management, organization, photocopying documents, etc.)

5% miscellaneous (grabbing coffee, chatting with colleagues from a safe distance with masks on)

I typically work from 845am to 545pm.

 

My day is a pretty similar split as an articling student at a Big Firm but with longer hours (8-8-ish) and probably 10% administrative tasks,  10% miscellaneous.

There's some mediations/arbitrations/client Zoom meetings/drafting disclosure documents/hearings/settlement conferences/trials thrown in there too, depending which practice group you're attached to at a given time. 

Edited by Starling

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