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hopefullawstudent202

Renting in Downtown Toronto for the summer

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Anyone has experience with finding a place in DT Toronto just for the summer?

I'd be most interested in renting an entire unit, or apartment. 

Edited by hopefullawstudent202

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Facebook groups like Ryerson or U of T Off Campus housing are definitely your best bet. Most students moving back home during the summer months sublet their apartments downtown for the summer so you can usually get a pretty good deal (especially currently). 

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2 minutes ago, catgirl2022 said:

Are firms expecting students to be physically in Toronto for the summer if work will be remote? 

I think it's safe to say that it may be required for students to be physically at the firm some days of the week. 

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11 minutes ago, hopefullawstudent202 said:

I think it's safe to say that it may be required for students to be physically at the firm some days of the week. 

If you’re hired, I would confirm with your firm before committing to anything. 

I don’t think it’s safe to say anything at this point and, depending on the firm, you may not even be allowed to physically enter the office absent exceptional circumstances. 

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17 minutes ago, easttowest said:

If you’re hired, I would confirm with your firm before committing to anything. 

I don’t think it’s safe to say anything at this point and, depending on the firm, you may not even be allowed to physically enter the office absent exceptional circumstances. 

Yes, of course people should ask the firms before renting a place. However, some firms are currently allowing employees to go to the office, and from what I've asked when speaking with the recruitment teams is that it is expected from students to be available to go to the office in some situations. 

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