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So I messaged admissions about my application and some insight on the holistic round. I received a very vague reply which is understandable considering there’s not much information about it regardless. But then, the person I spoke to proceeded to advise me that it’s favourable to take some time off and work before pursuing law school if I really want it. I’m not sure if I’m reading too much into this but I am now freaking out and feeling super down about my chances. I know my chances at the U of A were slim to begin with but I thought I’d be okay at schools like TRU or Sask or Ryerson which is why I applied broadly. But now I have completely lost faith and am FREAKING OUT. It feels like I was basically told yea you don’t really have a chance just take some time off and try again later (again I know I may be reading too much into this) 😭 

I’ve worked quite hard at this- I know my GPA is solid. The lsat has been a struggle for me, I was very excited about my increase this Jan (150-155) -even though I know it’s not the best score it felt like a huge accomplishment for me but now I am feeling super bummed about my chances. Any advice/insight/reassurance/ brutal honesty is appreciated  😂😂

 

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UofA admissions saying that to you may indeed be a not-so-subtle hint that odds are not in your favour with respect to them specifically, but it really has no bearing on your applications with the other schools. So, relax.

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You're L2 GPA would need to be around 3.8 in order to have a chance at admission with a 155 LSAT, according to last year's admitted applicant profile. If you're at or above this, don't give up hope. If you're not that high, pray for TRU or Sask. Don't go to Rye except as a last resort.

Edited by Chazz
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You could totally see it as a crappy way to find out that your chances might not be in your favour. I'm more of the foolish optimist that would take it as a helpful early sign for you to realign your hopes for the U of A. I totally agree that you should check the previously admitted scores and see where you are and gauge accordingly. Waiting anxiously is really exhausting, especially when you don't know when you're going to hear back. Good on you for applying broadly, so many universities are sending out their offers later in the year. It's literally out of your hands and because we can't control it, it can bring on this helpless feeling.

I went through a rejection year and while I was worried waiting, I went ahead and slowly planned for each outcome. I was graduating during COVID so I remade my resume, took a public speaking course, made a list of all the shows I was going to binge, reflected whether my current volunteer and work was relevant in law, etc. Then I got rejected, shamelessly gave myself time to ball my eyes out and then started on with my plan. It really helped knowing there was something I was ready to do right after being rejected. Really put me in perspective and when I applied this year, you bet I did the same thing.

Not saying that this will happen, of course, I hope you kick ass under the holistic section! Just thought it might be worth to share as it definitely helped me be more calm during these uneasy times.

 

 

 

Edited by seallover
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6 hours ago, Chazz said:

You're L2 GPA would need to be around 3.8 in order to have a chance at admission with a 155 LSAT, according to last year's admitted applicant profile. If you're at or above this, don't give up hope. If you're not that high, pray for TRU or Sask. Don't go to Rye except as a last resort.

I have a 3.81! I would have had a 3.84 but Winter 2020 doesn’t count. My fingers are crossed nonetheless hahaha. 

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5 hours ago, seallover said:

You could totally see it as a crappy way to find out that your chances might not be in your favour. I'm more of the foolish optimist that would take it as a helpful early sign for you to realign your hopes for the U of A. I totally agree that you should check the previously admitted scores and see where you are and gauge accordingly. Waiting anxiously is really exhausting, especially when you don't know when you're going to hear back. Good on you for applying broadly, so many universities are sending out their offers later in the year. It's literally out of your hands and because we can't control it, it can bring on this helpless feeling.

I went through a rejection year and while I was worried waiting, I went ahead and slowly planned for each outcome. I was graduating during COVID so I remade my resume, took a public speaking course, made a list of all the shows I was going to binge, reflected whether my current volunteer and work was relevant in law, etc. Then I got rejected, shamelessly gave myself time to ball my eyes out and then started on with my plan. It really helped knowing there was something I was ready to do right after being rejected. Really put me in perspective and when I applied this year, you bet I did the same thing.

Not saying that this will happen, of course, I hope you kick ass under the holistic section! Just thought it might be worth to share as it definitely helped me be more calm during these uneasy times.

 

 

 

Thank you for taking the time to write this. I really appreciate it. I kind of knew from the start U of A would be an uphill battle.. but I got a little more optimistic when I heard that U of A is taking the highest LSAT (150,155). Now my hopes are crushed once again hahaha. 
 

Ive actually also been through a rejection cycle. I was waitlisted last year at Windsor and TRU. I improved both my GPA and LSAT this time so my fingers are really crossed for at least TRU. 
 

Good on you for taking back that control and working hard to try at it again. I definitely know the feeling - it can be very discouraging to get those rejection letters. Have you heard back from any where yet and may I ask what are your stats? 😊

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Did they pull up your file while discussing it with you? As in, did the admissions person know your stats while you spoke?

If not, I would take their suggestions as friendly advice and try not to think too much about it. There should be quite a few more batches to go.

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3 minutes ago, Ttallent said:

Did they pull up your file while discussing it with you? As in, did the admissions person know your stats while you spoke?

If not, I would take their suggestions as friendly advice and try not to think too much about it. There should be quite a few more batches to go.

Great point. I did reference my stats in the email but I actually got a response from an admissions recruiter - I guess it wasn’t directly from someone on the adcom. 

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As someone who is also anxiously awaiting admissions I would say that some comforting things that have helped me with managing if I don't get in this year are that the average admissions age is 25-26 years. I obviously don't know your age, but for me this gave comfort as it meant if I do get rejected then I will take the time to invest it in relevant work experience and boosting my LSAT score without "falling behind" the general population in law school. While age doesn't really matter, it helped me rationalize that I am really young in comparison to other applicants and I should not take it as an insult/discouragement to spend the same amount of time they have taken to invest in getting into law school. Also, you can always transfer after 1L so if you dislike your school then you can always transfer! 

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6 minutes ago, raybens said:

As someone who is also anxiously awaiting admissions I would say that some comforting things that have helped me with managing if I don't get in this year are that the average admissions age is 25-26 years. I obviously don't know your age, but for me this gave comfort as it meant if I do get rejected then I will take the time to invest it in relevant work experience and boosting my LSAT score without "falling behind" the general population in law school. While age doesn't really matter, it helped me rationalize that I am really young in comparison to other applicants and I should not take it as an insult/discouragement to spend the same amount of time they have taken to invest in getting into law school. Also, you can always transfer after 1L so if you dislike your school then you can always transfer! 

This is true as well. I’m early twenties I always forget that haha. Thanks :) 

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Just now, member123456 said:

This is true as well. I’m early twenties I always forget that haha. Thanks :) 

I honestly am glad I found that info cuz it was a bit of a reality check. It obviously doesn't make it feel any better to get rejected, but it honestly forced me to check my pride a bit. If we do get in we will be in an entirely different stage of life than the other applicants and that might not be the best thing. If we do get in I'm sure we will kick ass regardless! I really hope they announce the next wave today though because I'm going insane waiting!!

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28 minutes ago, raybens said:

I honestly am glad I found that info cuz it was a bit of a reality check. It obviously doesn't make it feel any better to get rejected, but it honestly forced me to check my pride a bit. If we do get in we will be in an entirely different stage of life than the other applicants and that might not be the best thing. If we do get in I'm sure we will kick ass regardless! I really hope they announce the next wave today though because I'm going insane waiting!!

Work experience opportunities are always an added benefit to an application regardless of it is for law or a masters program I've always been told that from different professionals and professors... of coarse people get in without that life experience but it can help you later too for networks... just another thought... 

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9 hours ago, member123456 said:

So I messaged admissions about my application and some insight on the holistic round. I received a very vague reply which is understandable considering there’s not much information about it regardless. But then, the person I spoke to proceeded to advise me that it’s favourable to take some time off and work before pursuing law school if I really want it. I’m not sure if I’m reading too much into this but I am now freaking out and feeling super down about my chances. I know my chances at the U of A were slim to begin with but I thought I’d be okay at schools like TRU or Sask or Ryerson which is why I applied broadly. But now I have completely lost faith and am FREAKING OUT. It feels like I was basically told yea you don’t really have a chance just take some time off and try again later (again I know I may be reading too much into this) 😭 

I’ve worked quite hard at this- I know my GPA is solid. The lsat has been a struggle for me, I was very excited about my increase this Jan (150-155) -even though I know it’s not the best score it felt like a huge accomplishment for me but now I am feeling super bummed about my chances. Any advice/insight/reassurance/ brutal honesty is appreciated  😂😂

 

Hi! I know exactly how you feel - this isn't my first application cycle. I was in almost exactly your shoes in early 2019. I'd always planned on law school and becoming a lawyer, and my GPA was around a 79% (no drops) and my LSAT was a 155 and 158. I spent the better part of my last year of undergrad freaking out about my chances at law school, my future, feeling so anxious, worried, and partly shameful that I hadn't been accepted yet. And those feelings are 100% valid (we aren't here to invalidate people's feelings!). 

I like to believe that everything happens for a reason, and one evening while anxiously checking my law schools applications (for the 5000th time - after receiving 1 rejection already) a friend of mine mentioned an opportunity to work with a professor from my department. I decided to take the plunge and email that professor, and ended up getting a fully funded 2 year Master's Degree out of it... and I even got accepted to law school (UNB) the same week I got the Master's offer. I decided to take the MA offer instead of law school because, at the time, I felt so pulled to that degree. And now, not only have I been accepted in this cycle after an LSAT rewrite, I have spent the last two years making connections, learning about things that will help me in a law career and law school, and I am more financially stable than I was 2 years ago. Sometimes, and more often than not, things don't work out the way we wanted to or thought they would, but it doesn't always mean that things won't work out! (In retrospect, I definitely made the right decision for me, because had I accepted UNB, I would have spent the first 8 months in NB totally fine, then I'd have had everything shift with COVID, half my law degree be online in a province and city where I had no family and only new friendships, rather than being in a place I love with my best friends. We never know what will happen, but I think having a little faith in ourselves and our choices can go a long way!)

My advice? Take a few deep breaths and accept that things are out of your control for a bit. You may get accepted, you may not - but it's what you do in the meantime that can make the difference. (Also I am pretty sure that UNB is still taking applications for a few more days, your stats are around their averages if you are dead-set on law school in the fall!). I think it's important for you to have faith in yourself, but also to be realistic. See if you can line up a job, a post-grad opportunity, or something else for September, but don't count yourself out yet. I thought I had no chance at an acceptance in 2019, but my UNB offer came at the end of May - there is still time for you! I hope this helps ease your worries, even slightly. I believe in you!!

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1 hour ago, noelle11 said:

Hi! I know exactly how you feel - this isn't my first application cycle. I was in almost exactly your shoes in early 2019. I'd always planned on law school and becoming a lawyer, and my GPA was around a 79% (no drops) and my LSAT was a 155 and 158. I spent the better part of my last year of undergrad freaking out about my chances at law school, my future, feeling so anxious, worried, and partly shameful that I hadn't been accepted yet. And those feelings are 100% valid (we aren't here to invalidate people's feelings!). 

I like to believe that everything happens for a reason, and one evening while anxiously checking my law schools applications (for the 5000th time - after receiving 1 rejection already) a friend of mine mentioned an opportunity to work with a professor from my department. I decided to take the plunge and email that professor, and ended up getting a fully funded 2 year Master's Degree out of it... and I even got accepted to law school (UNB) the same week I got the Master's offer. I decided to take the MA offer instead of law school because, at the time, I felt so pulled to that degree. And now, not only have I been accepted in this cycle after an LSAT rewrite, I have spent the last two years making connections, learning about things that will help me in a law career and law school, and I am more financially stable than I was 2 years ago. Sometimes, and more often than not, things don't work out the way we wanted to or thought they would, but it doesn't always mean that things won't work out! (In retrospect, I definitely made the right decision for me, because had I accepted UNB, I would have spent the first 8 months in NB totally fine, then I'd have had everything shift with COVID, half my law degree be online in a province and city where I had no family and only new friendships, rather than being in a place I love with my best friends. We never know what will happen, but I think having a little faith in ourselves and our choices can go a long way!)

My advice? Take a few deep breaths and accept that things are out of your control for a bit. You may get accepted, you may not - but it's what you do in the meantime that can make the difference. (Also I am pretty sure that UNB is still taking applications for a few more days, your stats are around their averages if you are dead-set on law school in the fall!). I think it's important for you to have faith in yourself, but also to be realistic. See if you can line up a job, a post-grad opportunity, or something else for September, but don't count yourself out yet. I thought I had no chance at an acceptance in 2019, but my UNB offer came at the end of May - there is still time for you! I hope this helps ease your worries, even slightly. I believe in you!!

Thank you so much for the kind words and taking the time to write such a detailed message. I really really appreciate it. 

Congrats on the opportunity and congrats on getting into law school! Sounds like you had quite the journey. You've given me some things to think about for sure, if I do happen to be unsuccessful this application round I definitely think I'll need to take a break and go out into the world for a bit. 

It just sucks because I feel like I have a strong GPA and a borderline LSAT- I have a few friends who were in the same boat but got in last year at the U of A. I just want an acceptance somewhere haha. 

 

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6 hours ago, member123456 said:

Good on you for taking back that control and working hard to try at it again. I definitely know the feeling - it can be very discouraging to get those rejection letters. Have you heard back from any where yet and may I ask what are your stats? 😊

Yeah for sure! If you lurk my profile you can see I'm around a GPA of 3.85 and 3.9 and scored a cancel, 151 and then a 158 for my LSAT.

I got accepted at TRU and honestly could ride off this high for the next three years, because I was so surprised to be in so early with my stats. Especially because no one with my stats had been accepted in any other places I applied, I never really started to worry yet because I told myself that obviously the people with higher stats with me are going to accepted first. That's easier said than done though. :)

I've really noticed that TRU is holistic because I shouldn't have been accepted right away with just my stats, so I'm hoping you get into the next following waves!

Edited by seallover
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27 minutes ago, seallover said:

Yeah for sure! If you lurk my profile you can see I'm around a GPA of 3.85 and 3.9 and scored a cancel, 151 and then a 158 for my LSAT.

I got accepted at TRU and honestly could ride off this high for the next three years, because I was so surprised to be in so early with my stats. Especially because no one with my stats had been accepted in any other places I applied, I never really started to worry yet because I told myself that obviously the people with higher stats with me are going to accepted first. That's easier said than done though. :)

I've really noticed that TRU is holistic because I shouldn't have been accepted right away with just my stats, so I'm hoping you get into the next following waves!

Why were u so pessimistic about TRU. I got in for 2019 cycle in November with worse stats 

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2 minutes ago, AJD19 said:

Why were u so pessimistic about TRU. I got in for 2019 cycle in November with worse stats 

This cycle's been a different beast everywhere. Signs point to inflated admissions standards and it has been common for people with stats that would've already been accepted in other years to not hear a peep yet this year. 

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