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Evander1992

2.5 cGPA 175 LSAT

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hi all, i was wondering if anyone could speak to my situation as i have been a part time student working full time for my entire undergraduate career. I am going on year 8 of my undergrad degree and will be finished this may. I can't provide a best two because literally all of my semesters are part time and sporadic (some semesters are 2-3 courses, others are 6 courses and others no courses at all). I worked full time because i needed to support myself and work opportunities were more my priorities. 

do i have a shot in ontario?

Edited by Evander1992

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I'm skeptical that someone who truly received a 175 would wait until late February to ask whether they had a shot in Ontario. Actual high-LSAT splitters typically know what score they need to gain admission before they begin studying for the test.

Edited by Tagger

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11 hours ago, albertabean said:

Is 175 your actual LSAT score or just predicted/hopeful score?

actual! however, it is a year old because I have been sitting on the idea of applying for a while..

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11 hours ago, Tagger said:

I'm skeptical that someone who truly received a 175 would wait until late February to ask whether they had a shot in Ontario. Actual high-LSAT splitters typically know what score they need to gain admission before they begin studying for the test.

the score is actually a year old, and i have still not decided if i will bother applying. The earliest I would go would be Fall 2022. 

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I think you should shoot your shot, though if it is within your means to take some additional credits in an undergraduate program to boost your cGPA, it can only help you. Assuming your score is real, as you claim, your cGPA is really the only thing limiting your chances.

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Why is your GPA so terrible? 
 

If you’ve been taking undergraduate classes for 8 years, and are capable of a 175 (I’m assuming without any sort of accommodations), you are capable of getting As in undergraduate courses. 

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I think Ryerson takes your best 20 courses no matter when they were taken. You might be able to apply as a mature since you've been working for more than 5 years, or discretionary if you have financial barriers that made you have to work. That's a really good LSAT, so I would say it's worth trying. 

Edited by legallybrunette3
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There have been instances of splitters like this getting into law schools in Ontario, yes, but keep in mind that they'll see that you took the better part of a decade to finish your degree and likely hold that against you. They already prefer full-time candidates over part-time, because they want to know that you can handle the full-time nature of law school. This example is an even more extreme case than even a part-time student. 

You can explain yourself in your personal statement, it might help your case because it'll give more context to your situation. But that said, law school is anywhere from double to triple the tuition that undergrad is, and if you needed to work full-time to support yourself in undergrad, then it's not a foregone assumption to make that you definitely will need to work full-time in law school as well - which means that you won't be able to keep up with the demands of law school. 

Applying for financial aid is also an option, so that you won't have to work as much and can focus on your studies - but given your GPA, it's not likely that you'll get anything. They'd probably much rather give scholarships and bursaries to a student with a higher GPA because they'll be seen as a more reliable investment of their funds. 

All this being said, depending on where you apply it's likely still not impossible to get in. Work experience is highly valued with adcomms, so you should focus on trying for holistic schools as much as you can.

 If you do manage to get in - that's amazing! In that case, I advise that you do whatever you can to secure OSAP, a PSLOC, anything you can to make sure your finances are taken care of - you need to dedicate as much time as you can to law school, because it's a whole other beast than undergrad. 

Best of luck.

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Former adcomm here. Assuming you have a smattering of A's to balance out your lower courses, that 175  LSAT says you'll likely get in somewhere. 

Lots of schools focus on your L2 GPA, so what's that like for you?

Count backwards from your most recent course until you've gotten at least 10 full credits. You can't split up school years/summers. So if your last course 10 lands on say something you took in the summer, you continue counting and include all the courses you took in the fall/winter semester leading up. If the course lands in the winter, you  include all the courses from the fall as well.

 If you have a handful of courses dragging you down, you can also look at schools that drop your lowest, although I don't know of any in Ontario that calculate GPA that way.

Oh, and no one will care that you took 8 years to finish your undergrad if you have a good explanation. And yours is a pretty good one. Not everyone can do school full time. Schools know this.

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1 hour ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

Why is your GPA so terrible? 
 

If you’ve been taking undergraduate classes for 8 years, and are capable of a 175 (I’m assuming without any sort of accommodations), you are capable of getting As in undergraduate courses. 

I’m confused by this statement. Why is OP’s testing conditions ( accommodations vs no accommodations) relevant? 

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32 minutes ago, Terracycle said:

I’m confused by this statement. Why is OP’s testing conditions ( accommodations vs no accommodations) relevant? 

The LSAT stops testing "g" when you remove time pressure.

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1 hour ago, pinkie2345678 said:

A mature student got accepted into Ottawa this cycle with 2.5 cGPA and 16x LSAT! Don't lose hope :) 

I'm the mature student in question here. cGPA was 2.5, L2 not much better though my B2 / B20 is closer to 3.5. LSAT was a 163. Accepted to Ottawa and waitlisted at Windsor so far this cycle (still waiting to hear back from literally everyone else). 

I finished my undergrad 15-years ago and have been working ever since, so our situations aren't entirely analogous, so take from this what you will.

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@Evander1992, with a 175 you should be able to get into law school somewhere. But are you prepared to abandon your part-time academic lifestyle and focus hardcore on academics full time?

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7 hours ago, SNAILS said:

@Evander1992, with a 175 you should be able to get into law school somewhere. But are you prepared to abandon your part-time academic lifestyle and focus hardcore on academics full time?

Some law schools have part time options. 

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On 2/26/2021 at 11:41 AM, Eeee said:

The LSAT stops testing "g" when you remove time pressure.

Yes, but I thought that law schools weren't allowed to make decisions based on whether or not it was an accommodated test (otherwise what would the point be)?

 

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/05/21/law-school-group-agrees-stop-flagging-scores-students-who-get-extra-time-due

https://www.kaptest.com/study/lsat/lsat-accommodations-what-you-need-to-know/

 

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