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HELP I need to learn about business before articling

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Hi everyone,

I don't come from a business background and did not take any business courses in law school. I have to do a corporate rotation for articling and feel very unprepared. Does anyone have any links to resources or reading material recommendations (particularly related to securities if possible) so I can have somewhat of a foundation before I start articling? 

As always, very grateful for everyone's advice. I don't know what I would do without this forum sometimes!

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For securities:

  1. First, check the company website to figure out what it is that your company does 
  2. Figure out what National Instruments are and review the applicable one when asked to do a task
  3. SEDAR and SEDI will contain most of what you need. Go to SEDAR for past filings e.g. financial statements, circulars, news releases etc. SEDI for info on directors/officers/insiders. 
  4. An annotated copy of the Securities Act is essential. It is a beast, but it's a great reference if you need to understand how a section works in practice. 
  5. 99% of the time, you'll have a precedent to work off of, so you're not drafting from scratch. Ask the person giving you work if they have a particular one they want you to work off of. 
    1. If there's no precedent from the assigning person or on your firm's server, Disclosurenet is really helpful. Go there if someone says to you "find a precedent for a company that filed a short form prospectus in the last few months/changed their auditor/completed an RTO"
    2. If you're drafting a resolution or other internal document, check the minute book of the company and use that as a precedent
  6. If you are asked to provide advice on a disclosure process and your firm has access to Practical Law, that provides a great overview of processes, so go to that if someone says "what are the steps for changing auditors/having a director step down" etc. go there. 
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2 hours ago, Starling said:

For securities:

  1. First, check the company website to figure out what it is that your company does 
  2. Figure out what National Instruments are and review the applicable one when asked to do a task
  3. SEDAR and SEDI will contain most of what you need. Go to SEDAR for past filings e.g. financial statements, circulars, news releases etc. SEDI for info on directors/officers/insiders. 
  4. An annotated copy of the Securities Act is essential. It is a beast, but it's a great reference if you need to understand how a section works in practice. 
  5. 99% of the time, you'll have a precedent to work off of, so you're not drafting from scratch. Ask the person giving you work if they have a particular one they want you to work off of. 
    1. If there's no precedent from the assigning person or on your firm's server, Disclosurenet is really helpful. Go there if someone says to you "find a precedent for a company that filed a short form prospectus in the last few months/changed their auditor/completed an RTO"
    2. If you're drafting a resolution or other internal document, check the minute book of the company and use that as a precedent
  6. If you are asked to provide advice on a disclosure process and your firm has access to Practical Law, that provides a great overview of processes, so go to that if someone says "what are the steps for changing auditors/having a director step down" etc. go there. 

Sometimes I want to make a binder of your responses on this forum... Would that be weird? Haha 

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3 minutes ago, DoWellAndGood said:

Sometimes I want to make a binder of your responses on this forum... Would that be weird? Haha 

Aww I'm flattered. 🥰 I'm just glad people find my responses helpful! Feel free to make a binder hahaha. 

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4 hours ago, powpow said:

Hi everyone,

I don't come from a business background and did not take any business courses in law school. I have to do a corporate rotation for articling and feel very unprepared. Does anyone have any links to resources or reading material recommendations (particularly related to securities if possible) so I can have somewhat of a foundation before I start articling? 

As always, very grateful for everyone's advice. I don't know what I would do without this forum sometimes!

What jurisdiction are you in? In BC you can find bar materials online, and you can access practice manuals using your school/work log-in. You might have something similar in your province.

When I need to learn about a practice area I'm not familiar with I go to the CLE practice manuals. Followed by annotated legislation.

A lot of my schools' alumni rely on our database of CANs/outlines for quick and dirty information on a particular area of law.

Edited by canuckfanatic
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