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142 on my first LSAT, should I pull my application?

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1 hour ago, almostnot said:

LSAC used to make the repeater data public, but I couldn't seem to find it online for recent years.  I did find this old link that might also be interesting to the OP: http://prelaw.umass.edu/uploads/documents/RepeaterData-1.pdf

How did someone with a 180 rewrite? I thought you were barred from writing again once you got a 180.

edit: data is from 2010-11. I don't think they had the rule back then.

Edited by VitalGiraffe

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23 minutes ago, VitalGiraffe said:

How did someone with a 180 rewrite? I thought you were barred from writing again once you got a 180.

edit: data is from 2010-11. I don't think they had the rule back then.

then not how but why.

Edited by legallybrunette3
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2 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

then not how but why.

My best guess would be an LSAT tutor who wants it for marketing purposes.

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2 hours ago, LSATGRIND69 said:

I went from a 135 to the upper 160s

That is insanely impressive. Good for you.

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34 minutes ago, VitalGiraffe said:

How did someone with a 180 rewrite? I thought you were barred from writing again once you got a 180.

edit: data is from 2010-11. I don't think they had the rule back then.

They changed that rule when I was prepping and I remember seeing it. Was about last year at this time

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46 minutes ago, Liavas said:

Why these ones only? (Dare I ask?)

Agreed. Obviously this is outside the scope of OP's question but without a solid score in hand, I strongly suggest they apply more broadly. 

Edited by Psychometronic

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1. I think you should apply to more schools and not remain married to the idea that these schools are the end all be all. 

2. Over-confidence seems to have been your downfall this time around..so how about we change that? I see in some of your replies that this hasn't happened yet as you are confident that reading some supplemental books, while having no PTs score that would actually be representative of your skill level, are enough to ensure your 170+ score. 

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58 minutes ago, VitalGiraffe said:

How did someone with a 180 rewrite? I thought you were barred from writing again once you got a 180.

edit: data is from 2010-11. I don't think they had the rule back then.

 

35 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

then not how but why.

 

28 minutes ago, lawstudent20202020 said:

4da.png

Gotta prove it wasn't a fluke!

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Hey OP, most LSAT prep companies advertise that their students see increases of 10/11 points.

I could see why someone might question this given they have a vested interest in your dollars, to me however, this seems pretty reasonable. This seems especially so when you consider the learnability of logic games. It’s common for people to get rocked by that section on the diagnostic and improve quickly at it through repetition. 
 

To the evidence stated previously in the thread citing that retakes on average yield a 2-3 point increase I take some issue with this. 
 

This data is 10 years old and I think current resources for prep are quite frankly better, ie: 7sage. Yes. I seriously think this platform is a league above what students a decade ago would have had at their disposal studying material wise. 
 

Also, how many students take the LSAT unprepared or having studied ineffectively? Too damn many. How many then retake it having not substantially improved their study methods? I would venture that plenty do. 
 

Additionally, you can retake this exam more than once. I doubt most schools really care if you get a good score on your fourth take versus your 2nd, at least not to a point where it will any great impediment to your admission. 
 

So in sum, I do believe that if you’re even an average 0L with the right resources, study methods and determination that you can improve substantially on this test. 
 

All this being said. From 142 to 170+ is incredibly unlikely-I don’t care who your tutor is. But I wouldn’t put it past you to score somewhere in the mid to high 150s with that score. You might even be able to break 160. 
 

Best of luck to you! :) 

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26 minutes ago, Seekingredemption said:

resources for prep are quite frankly better

Agreed. I didn't do anything to improve that the average person couldn't do. I didn't like get a brain transplant or anything I just drilled, and improvement on games didn't take long at all, maybe a month or two of drilling. It took some trial and error to figure out what to do on repeat that I didn't do the first time. I imagine the lack of improvement comes from the fact that low scorers aren't studying the right way, and then when they repeat it they continue doing what they were doing before. The more challenging part for me was just figuring out what the LSAT writers were doing, and then it was easy to avoid their tricks and get to the meat of what the question was asking. 

Also the retakes are within a cycle, so it wouldn't include people that actually took the time necessary to prepare. 

26 minutes ago, Seekingredemption said:

All this being said. From 142 to 170+ is incredibly unlikely-I don’t care who your tutor is.

Also agree with this, and definitely not by August. 

Edited by legallybrunette3
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1 hour ago, Seekingredemption said:

This data is 10 years old and I think current resources for prep are quite frankly better, ie: 7sage. Yes. I seriously think this platform is a league above what students a decade ago would have had at their disposal studying material wise. 
 

Let's not forget the LSAT is administered internationally as well. People who's native language isn't english is taking the test in english. Not being a native speaker can be a obstacle in getting a bigger score jump.

In my experience, everyone who I have met personally has improved more than 2.5 points.

So I agree with you, I think that data set is old and there are now definite resources for those who want to improve, to improve, drastically. 

 

Edited by LSATGRIND69

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Y’all know that back in the Stone Age, when I wrote the LSAT on a slate, we still had prep courses, LSAT tutors and published practice tests?

I don’t know that anything has changed substantially. (Including everyone’s deeply held need to believe in their own exceptionalism.)

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27 minutes ago, almostnot said:

Y’all know that back in the Stone Age, when I wrote the LSAT on a slate, we still had prep courses, LSAT tutors and published practice tests?

I don’t know that anything has changed substantially. (Including everyone’s deeply held need to believe in their own exceptionalism.)

I think my opinion is based on the opposite of a notion of exceptionalism. I even stated that I think most average 0Ls could succeed on the LSAT-with a few qualifications.
 

I’ll clarify my point about current resources being better. I don’t mean to offend anyone here who took this test previously. 
 

There’s a video library of virtually every single LSAT question available on 7Sage. Maybe you could dig up answers on a forum back then, but I doubt the ease of access is matched-7Sage has everything in one place. 
 

What if you were more of an audio/visual learner? Maybe you could have attended a class, or been tutored, but these options are expensive and not available to everyone. You can engage in this kind of learning on 7Sage and it’s relatively cheap. 
 

Need motivation? Someone to study with for help with a certain concept, or maybe to commiserate a bit with? That forum has a ton of kind people eager to help one another. 
 

Struggling with a certain question type? Flag them as you go, come back later, and create problem set after problem set with a few clicks. I’m sure you could emulate this with paper tests, but it’s just one more barrier. 
 

I’m sure I could go on but at this point I probably seem like I’m getting paid by J.Y to promote his business. 
 

Edit: Creating problem sets to drill weaknesses would have certainly been more difficult, and this is one of the most powerful ways to improve. 7Sage has each question type labelled to facilitate creating the sets. Each question is always ranked in terms of difficulty so you target based on type and/or difficulty. 
 

Edit #2: I didn’t even mention the numerous podcasts available, or even the entire LSAT Demon platform, where they use AI to gauge your weaknesses. 
 

Edited by Seekingredemption
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On 2/22/2021 at 9:53 PM, Psychometronic said:

What’s the point of pulling your apps? You won’t get your application fee back. The only thing that’ll save you from is the sting of rejection emails.

How many/which schools give application feedback? 

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4 minutes ago, TotallyBucked said:

How many/which schools give application feedback? 

Application fee, not application feedback. As far as I know, none of them return your fee.

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1 minute ago, Psychometronic said:

Application fee, not application feedback. As far as I know, none of them return your fee.

Add this to the long list of evidence of my illiteracy. Cheers. 

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1 hour ago, TotallyBucked said:

How many/which schools give application feedback? 

For what it’s worth, some schools give feedback once the cycle’s officially over (end of Aug I believe). Contact their offices for specific details. 

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I received a 143 on my first official lsat and i was devastated as law school has always been my dream. I decided to take a year off after graduation to study for the test, i studied for about 6-7 month none stop, everyday. I have done almost every single PT and have done over 40 of them under real test conditions. By practising and timing myself everyday and not allowing any distractions,  I managed to get a 162 on the January flex, that is a 19 point jump! I have been accepted to two Ontario schools already. So OP if you really decide to put everything else aside and just focus on the test, you will be able to score at least a 160 

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