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techlaw2025

142 on my first LSAT, should I pull my application?

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Hi, 

I applied to three schools for Fall 2021 (UofT, Osgoode, and UBC) - received an 142 on my lsat.... I work Full-Time and I under estimated the study effort. I'm already preparing to write my LSAT again for July/August this year so I can get at least 167 (I now have a great mentor who got 180 on his LSAT, so I'm confident about hitting over 170 by August this year). 

Should I pull-out my application, for Fall 2021 cycle... and re-apply this November (and early) for Fall 2022? I plan to use the same references, as they were both stellar. Also, I really like my personal statement and paid lots of money to make it great. 

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8 minutes ago, techlaw2025 said:

I'm already preparing to write my LSAT again for July/August this year so I can get at least 167 (I now have a great mentor who got 180 on his LSAT, so I'm confident about hitting over 170 by August this year). 

Are they writing the test for you? I'm sorry but this is an absurd statement. I'm not saying you can't improve but being confident you can go from an 18th percentile score to a 98th percentile score in six months is... bold.

Quote

Also, I really like my personal statement and paid lots of money to make it great. 

Okay now I'm leaning toward this being a troll post.

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7 minutes ago, FoodBankFred said:

I had no idea there was an industry for Law School Personal Statements. I must look into that. 

I know you’re being sarcastic but after seeing a bit of what the law school admissions game down south looks like, what you’ve said here isn’t really hyperbole. 
 

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1 hour ago, Tagger said:

Yes. You have no chance of admission at those schools with a 142. 

Based on your current score, I would caution you against thinking you can score a 170 because your tutor scored a 180. 

Thank you for actually answering my question straight

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1 hour ago, chaboywb said:

Are they writing the test for you? I'm sorry but this is an absurd statement. I'm not saying you can't improve but being confident you can go from an 18th percentile score to a 98th percentile score in six months is... bold.

Okay now I'm leaning toward this being a troll post.

I definitely paid a lot of money to make sure it was stellar.... anyways, yes. I totally underestimated this exam. I'm surprised i didn't fail

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53 minutes ago, FoodBankFred said:

I had no idea there was an industry for Law School Personal Statements. I must look into that. 

If you want to feel confident about your Personal statement, and you have the money, then I suggest you go for it. 

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1 hour ago, legallybrunette3 said:

Did you include a photo of you rowing? 

 

1 hour ago, legallybrunette3 said:

Did you include a photo of you rowing? 

 

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1 hour ago, techlaw2025 said:

Hi, 

I applied to three schools for Fall 2021 (UofT, Osgoode, and UBC) - received an 142 on my lsat.... I work Full-Time and I under estimated the study effort. I'm already preparing to write my LSAT again for July/August this year so I can get at least 167 (I now have a great mentor who got 180 on his LSAT, so I'm confident about hitting over 170 by August this year). 

Should I pull-out my application, for Fall 2021 cycle... and re-apply this November (and early) for Fall 2022? I plan to use the same references, as they were both stellar. Also, I really like my personal statement and paid lots of money to make it great. 

As some others have mentioned, it's not easy to develop that quick. And it's probably unlikely you hit 170+ or even 165+ by August. The only way I can see this happening is if you quit your full time job and fully immerse yourself with the LSAT. 

At a score of 142, there's likely a reading comprehension problem - you aren't understanding the words you read fast enough to score better. There are no quick fixes for this problem. You just have to read more and get the hang of some strategies to help you along the way. This takes time.

I know its depressing to hear but I went from a 135 to the upper 160s and it took me a few years to accomplish this. I, like you, thought this test could be gamed. It can't. There's no magic pill for the LSAT, it comes down to hard work, dedication, and practice. Albeit, I didn't have a tutor and I had some month long gaps in between because of burnout and other obligations. In total, I probably studied full time 6 to 8 months. So if your serious, you can do it by August. But you got to focus all your energy and time on the LSAT now. If this isn't something you can commit too, I'd book for November or January of next year.

 

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What’s the point of pulling your apps? You won’t get your application fee back. The only thing that’ll save you from is the sting of rejection emails.

Edit: To anyone else reading, don’t waste money on services that claim to spruce up your PS. 

Edited by Psychometronic
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1 minute ago, Psychometronic said:

What’s the point of pulling your apps? You won’t get your application fee back. The only thing that’ll save you from is the sting of rejection emails.

Good point - I think it's because I know I didn't try my best, and it was my first go around the LSAT experience. Not proud, I know it wasn't my best efforts either. 

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Even if I did pay... I'm over it at this point. I was worried if Osgoode, UofT, and UBC will keep it on file or something. 

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5 minutes ago, LSATGRIND69 said:

As some others have mentioned, it's not easy to develop that quick. And it's probably unlikely you hit 170+ or even 165+ by August. The only way I can see this happening is if you quit your full time job and fully immerse yourself with the LSAT. 

At a score of 142, there's likely a reading comprehension problem - you aren't understanding the words you read fast enough to score better. There are no quick fixes for this problem. You just have to read more and get the hang of some strategies to help you along the way. This takes time.

I know its depressing to hear but I went from a 135 to the upper 160s and it took me a few years to accomplish this. I, like you, thought this test could be gamed. It can't. There's no magic pill for the LSAT, it comes down to hard work, dedication, and practice. Albeit, I didn't have a tutor and I had some month long gaps in between because of burnout and other obligations. In total, I probably studied full time 6 to 8 months. So if your serious, you can do it by August. But you got to focus all your energy and time on the LSAT now. If this isn't something you can commit too, I'd book for November or January of next year.

 

Thanks for the feedback - I really appreciate this and youre right. This is what my tutor/mentor said as well. I'm currently reading 2 recommended books before I get into hardcore studying again.

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1 hour ago, techlaw2025 said:

... I really like my personal statement and paid lots of money to make it great.

Hot up here - Imgflip

In all seriousness, you can probably improve with more study. But why did you risk applying without a score already in hand and with a January testing? I'm assuming you must have been doing PTs and gotten a rough idea of your potential score...? Some people do worse on the actual thing than in practice, but you chose UofT, Oz, and UBC, so you must have had confidence in something. Did you decide to apply last minute? 

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This commentary might be interesting to people.  The average gain from rewriting was 2.8 points: https://www.lsac.org/data-research/research/performance-repeat-test-takers-law-school-admission-test-2006-2007-through

LSAC used to make the repeater data public, but I couldn't seem to find it online for recent years.  I did find this old link that might also be interesting to the OP: http://prelaw.umass.edu/uploads/documents/RepeaterData-1.pdf

In 2010-11, there was one person who scored 150 or less and was able to rewrite at a 170+ level.  This was out of a total pool of 25k rewriters. 

Edited by almostnot
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2 hours ago, legallybrunette3 said:

Did you include a photo of you rowing? 

I'm curious, where did this joke about rowing come from? 

 

2 hours ago, techlaw2025 said:

I'm confident about hitting over 170 by August this year

I would caution about over confidence on the LSAT. It is very difficult to score over 170. Before taking the LSAT have you done multiple PTs that might have indicated that you would score around the 18th percentile? 

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2 hours ago, techlaw2025 said:

I'm confident about hitting over 170 by August this year

If you aren't trolling, then you are straight up delusional. Aiming for a 175+ and then getting a 142 should have been a wakeup call for you.

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