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Hey everyone!

I know I’m probably just being dramatic and nervous, but is it common for there to be a decent amount of offers in March, or is UBC like U of T where they mostly do rejections then? For reference, my LSAT is a 166 and GPA is an 83.2%, which I know is just around their median. I felt good about my PS and talked a lot about the work I’d done for EDI at my university and my interest in pursuing criminal law. I know the next round is going to be after March 1, but I just wanted to see what you all thought. UBC is my top choice so I’m just starting to get a bit nervous! 

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UBC says they send out the majority of their acceptances between January and the end of April for their general applicants... I suspect if the majority went out January to the end of February they would say that instead. There's still time and hope, good luck to you! 

 

http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/Vancouver/pdf/UBC_Vancouver_Calendar_Peter_A_Allard_School_of_Law.pdf

Edited by UBCQuery
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6 hours ago, UBCQuery said:

UBC says they send out the majority of their acceptances between January and the end of April for their general applicants... I suspect if the majority went out January to the end of February they would say that instead. There's still time and hope, good luck to you! 

 

http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/Vancouver/pdf/UBC_Vancouver_Calendar_Peter_A_Allard_School_of_Law.pdf

Thank you! I hope so :)

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Hi there! I'm in a similar boat as you - think my stats should be sufficient but have yet to hear from them.

I called admissions on feb 4 to ask about my adjusted gpa, and the person on the phone told me that from my stats I can still be optimistic about my chances, but by that point they had yet to read my PS. Also, when I asked, he said they had yet to read even half of the personal statements, so it seems like admissions has a lot of work ahead of them and more offers to be made (at least as of early feb). Fingers crossed for all of us!

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