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Has anyone here worked as a student either with the government of alberta or with the city of edmonton? I was wondering if I could ask some questions about how you got those positions?

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Hi!! I can't speak on working during law school, but I currently work part-time with the federal gov  (undergrad 4th year) and I've been extended to full-time work for the summer. 

Apply through FSWEP (Federal Student Work Experience Program). If you are Indigenous or Metis, there's a separate portal for that I believe. The application process takes a bit of time, but definitely worth it. 

Edited by Candleholder3

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Same as above, not a law student yet, and I don't work for the City of Edmonton but for a municipality right outside of Edmonton. I was casual/part time for half of my undergrad and now am full time as I wait to hear from law school. 

Personally I knew someone who worked here and I knew they were looking for a casual pool of employees and due to being enrolled in a relevant degree they were able to bring me on. I know casual positions are limited due to COVID but if you have any questions I can try my best to answer if you'd like to message me!

Edit: there are currently "wage" admin and judicial clerk positions open with the Alberta government. Might be worth looking into! You could always work more hours up until your acceptance and then drop down to a more casual basis once classes start.

Edited by lkm97
additional info to add

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On 2/20/2021 at 1:24 PM, Candleholder3 said:

Hi!! I can't speak on working during law school, but I currently work part-time with the federal gov  (undergrad 4th year) and I've been extended to full-time work for the summer. 

Apply through FSWEP (Federal Student Work Experience Program). If you are Indigenous or Metis, there's a separate portal for that I believe. The application process takes a bit of time, but definitely worth it. 

If you don't mind me asking, what position do you currently work for the government as an undergrad?

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On 2/20/2021 at 10:24 AM, Candleholder3 said:

 Apply through FSWEP (Federal Student Work Experience Program). If you are Indigenous or Metis, there's a separate portal for that I believe. The application process takes a bit of time, but definitely worth it. 

Hi! Brief aside. Just fyi, Metis are Indigenous/Aboriginal, it's not an either/or. Thanks :)

Edited by castlepie
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On 2/22/2021 at 6:55 PM, Scourage said:

If you don't mind me asking, what position do you currently work for the government as an undergrad?

The position is called Service Clerk, and I do various admin activities!

 

 

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I worked with the gov for a summer internship was the best opportunity for connections and great experience was alot of prep for the interview but it was worth it. 

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