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kloserzchen

Is recommendation letter from host family acceptable?

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Hi all, this might be an uncommon question. I am an international student, when I first come to Canada, i was a minor, so host family was required, and even now I don't need host family anymore, me and my host family have been staying pretty close. I thought it was a good idea to put them as my reference because they are the people who know me the best here and able to comment on my strength. Furthermore, in my personal statment i emphasized on my ability to establish strong connections with people around me, so i felt their recommendation would confirms this part of my personal statement. 

But now i am having second thoughts about this, i felt it might not be perfessional enough.

What do you guys think? 

Thanks for any input

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Contact the schools directly. This is a pretty unique scenario. 

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I do not know which schools you plan to apply to, so my ability to provide a fulsome answer is limited (Canadian law schools have varying letter of recommendation requirements), though as a general principle, at least one is typically required to be from an academic reference (e.g a professor in a course you did well in, or one who supervised you while working as a RA). 

As Hegdis mentioned above, reaching out to the schools you are interested in directly on this matter should be your next move. I suspect though that if any schools are receptive to this idea, they will encourage you to submit it as a supplimentary letter, alongside one from an academic reference.

Edited by LabouriousCorvid
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8 minutes ago, LabouriousCorvid said:

I do not know which schools you plan to apply to, so my ability to provide a fulsome answer is limited (Canadian law schools have varying letter of recommendation requirements), though as a general principle, at least one is typically required to be from an academic reference (e.g a professor in a course you did well in, or one who supervised you while working as a RA). 

As Hegdis mentioned above, reaching out to the schools you are interested in directly on this matter should be your next move. I suspect though that if any schools are receptive to this idea, they will encourage you to submit it as a supplimentary letter, alongside one from an academic reference.

Thanks for the reply! I am applying u of m, I actually emailed them, they basically copy and paste their guidelines and replied me with that.

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4 hours ago, kloserzchen said:

Thanks for the reply! I am applying u of m, I actually emailed them, they basically copy and paste their guidelines and replied me with that.

You might have better luck getting a specific, more tailored answer if you call them on the phone and explain the full context of your situation in a real time conversation. If the law school admissions office continues to be unhelpful, try reaching out to your undergrad institution's careers office as they might have received similar questions from students in similar situations before.

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As others have said, reach out to the school over the phone. But in my opinion a letter from a host family wouldn't carry much weight. I suppose it could speak to the challenges you overcame in a new culture, but even then I'd rather see that in your personal statement. 

Overall I just don't think it's a particularly good idea unless you have very limited options. 

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Bad idea unless you really can't get a good LOR from your professors

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I think it would be better to ask yourself, "What are the best LORs I can get?" and not "Is ____________ type of LOR acceptable?"

You are probably too young to have any any significant LORs from your home country. So this leaves you with people you've worked for, people you've volunteered for or with, and professors.

If you have not asked all of your professors, then please do so.

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