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U of A is now taking highest LSAT !!

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1 minute ago, TheMidnightOil said:

Am I missing something? It still says this on the JD Admissions webpage:

 

An applicant's admission average will be calculated based on the most recently completed 60 credits and weighted against the averaged LSAT score.

You are not.

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Just now, LSATGRIND69 said:

You haven't hit all the possibilities.

The people who were on the fence with one LSAT score are now competing with people who have multiple takes. The latter could now in theory be pushed ahead because of this new rule. 

In regards to point 3. If I would have known that they are taking highest LSAT. I would have taken in September, November, and January to maximize my chances, as there's minimal risk to multiple takes under this new policy.

The people with one LSAT score have always competed with people who have multiple takes. This change in LSAT calculation does not affect that. I see your point that these people potentially have tougher competition now that LSAT scores are no longer averaged, but these same people chose to write only one LSAT as opposed to writing it again.

You can certainly argue now that these people with only one LSAT score chose to only write once because they had previously applied under the assumption that LSAT scores would be averaged, and thus, they run the risk of lowering their score for admission. This is, once again, a personal choice. I would like to reiterate that such fear comes from the fact that people are not confident enough to re-write the exam in order to get a higher score. The repercussion of the averaged LSAT certainly adds to this fear yes, but did it dissuade everyone from re-writing? Obviously not as evidenced by the people with multiple takes. It was a risk that some people took and others didn't. On top of that, we are only starting to hear of this change AFTER the last acceptable LSAT date. In my eyes, everyone was in the same playing field when making the decision to re-write or not. 

I understand that not everyone will agree with me on this point, but personally, while I was shocked to hear of this change, I really don't think this change is as bad as some people are making it out to be. 

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.

Edited by dalpaengi
original quote was deleted so I'll delete too
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25 minutes ago, spork123 said:

I thought I'd offer a different perspective on things. Some people on here are complaining that had they known UofA would take the highest LSAT score this cycle, they would have done things differently. Well here are a few things to take into consideration:

1. If you have multiple LSAT scores in your record, you should actually be happy with this change. Your LSAT score for admission calculation will now be higher.

2. If you only have one score in your record, your application itself by which I mean your stats are not affected by this. 

3. If you are saying that you could have taken the LSAT again had you known they would only look at the highest, here's the thing with this argument: while it may be harsh, you probably did not take it again because you were scared that you would get a lower score. If you were not confident that you would get a higher score, you should not be taking the LSAT again to begin with. The LSAT is not a joke, so this argument seems to me like an excuse that people are using to justify not taking the LSAT again. 

4. While I understand that some people are scared that this admission cycle will now be more competitive, the fact of the matter is that we don't know. We can speculate and come up with theories, but as long as we do not have access to the stats and to the exact admission process, they remain as nothing but speculations and theories. 

You have every right to be upset and to be frustrated by this change; however, it is not going to change anything, especially not for this admission cycle, seeing as how people have been admitted using the new admission process. 

 

Totally disagree. There's people who've studied months on end for the lsat and have had wildly fluctuating scores. It's totally fair to be too afraid to take the LSAT again for fear of dragging down your average- LSAT scores aren't perfectly correlated with the time you spent studying, let alone intelligence.

Knowing that UofA would take the highest one in September would evaporate those fears. I had a second take lined up after my first exam (because of LSAC's predatory sign-up deadlines being before the score release of the previous one), so I had to make a value judgement as to whether I wanted to keep my alright score or do better by a few points. I didn't know I'd have to watch out for a UofA sleight of hand as well. (Though this could be because of understaffed faculty due to province cuts) Regardless of outcome, UofA will have the urban legend around it on this forum as the school that changed the rules of the game in February. Also, to find out about this on a lawstudents forum as opposed to an official communication is just special.

Edited by toastedguac
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I wonder how many people didn’t even bother applying because they were misinformed about their low average score but high highest score. All because a webpage wasn’t updated.

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Conspiracy time: what if the person who started this thread is actually someone from the admissions committee, and this was how the university decided to break the news to everyone? Just think about it, this person has magically disappeared and isn't posting anymore. On top of that, this has been the only thing this person has posted in this whole website? 

Edit: and they joined this past Saturday

Edited by spork123
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22 minutes ago, Borker said:

Not exactly sure what you mean here. I was saying that it sucks for admission competition 

Ah, valid. Was thinking just in law student context. 

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47 minutes ago, TheMidnightOil said:

Assuming that the unofficial calculator is still relevant, how much would you guys think this changes the ‘safe’ threshold? Has the 242 become a 246?

I was thinking even higher, the statistics indicate people are doing better with the flex LSAT compared to previous years. I was thinking a 245-246 as "safe" under average LSATs. But now, I'm betting safe is 248 (or even more) just by how well everyone seems to be doing on the new LSAT format. 

I.e. Alberta had about over 30 applicants scoring 170 to 180 this year compared to last year.

Of course this is just the LSAT portion as we do not know how well these people did in L2 stats. But given how people are doing on the LSAT flex, taking highest score, and ~20% more applications, I anticipate an ultra competitive cycle.

Source for stats: https://report.lsac.org/VolumeSummary.aspx

Edited by LSATGRIND69

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14 minutes ago, spork123 said:

The people with one LSAT score have always competed with people who have multiple takes. This change in LSAT calculation does not affect that. I see your point that these people potentially have tougher competition now that LSAT scores are no longer averaged, but these same people chose to write only one LSAT as opposed to writing it again.

You can certainly argue now that these people with only one LSAT score chose to only write once because they had previously applied under the assumption that LSAT scores would be averaged, and thus, they run the risk of lowering their score for admission. This is, once again, a personal choice. I would like to reiterate that such fear comes from the fact that people are not confident enough to re-write the exam in order to get a higher score. The repercussion of the averaged LSAT certainly adds to this fear yes, but did it dissuade everyone from re-writing? Obviously not as evidenced by the people with multiple takes. It was a risk that some people took and others didn't. On top of that, we are only starting to hear of this change AFTER the last acceptable LSAT date. In my eyes, everyone was in the same playing field when making the decision to re-write or not. 

I understand that not everyone will agree with me on this point, but personally, while I was shocked to hear of this change, I really don't think this change is as bad as some people are making it out to be. 

I delayed to January to write the LSAT. If I knew they only take highest score, I would have tested sooner and reassess my situation from there.

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1 minute ago, LSATGRIND69 said:

I delayed to January to write the LSAT. If I knew they only take highest score, I would have tested sooner and reassess my situation from there.

I am in the exact same situation and it would've let me assess my weaknesses during the actual write better. I think it's hilarious to just change the admissions on a whim and then not tell anyone about it.

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7 minutes ago, LSATGRIND69 said:

I.e. Alberta had over 150 applicants scoring 170 to 180 this year compared to last year.

How did you calculate this?

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In any case, I wanna see fresh memes on here by the end of the day. The faculty's used to sending out waves, now they'll get their own wave in emails. 

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3 minutes ago, Borker said:

How did you calculate this?

In the link i posted, top left three lines --> canadian applicants --> click Alberta on the map --> go to right of screen and you see a table of this year LSAT scores compared to last year.

 

EDIT: Sorry (on phone lol) I made a slight error on my calculation of how many people got scores of 170 to 180. I used all of Canada. For AB its about 30 people who scored 170+ this year compared to last year. @dalpaengi is right about 160+. 

Edited by LSATGRIND69
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8 minutes ago, LSATGRIND69 said:

I was thinking even higher, the statistics indicate people are doing better with the flex LSAT compared to previous years. I was thinking a 245-246 as "safe" under average LSATs. But now, I'm betting safe is 248 (or even more) just by how well everyone seems to be doing on the new LSAT format. 

I.e. Alberta had over 150 applicants scoring 170 to 180 this year compared to last year.

Of course this is just the LSAT portion as we do not know how well these people did in L2 stats. But given how people are doing on the LSAT flex, taking highest score, and ~20% more applications, I anticipate an ultra competitive cycle.

Source for stats: https://report.lsac.org/VolumeSummary.aspx

From the source, I calculate an increase of 107 LSAT scores that are above 160 compared to last year.

That along with everything else, I think it's time we officially throw out the index score, at least for this cycle. 

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10 minutes ago, LSATGRIND69 said:

I was thinking even higher, the statistics indicate people are doing better with the flex LSAT compared to previous years. I was thinking a 245-246 as "safe" under average LSATs. But now, I'm betting safe is 248 (or even more) just by how well everyone seems to be doing on the new LSAT format. 

I.e. Alberta had over 150 applicants scoring 170 to 180 this year compared to last year.

Of course this is just the LSAT portion as we do not know how well these people did in L2 stats. But given how people are doing on the LSAT flex, taking highest score, and ~20% more applications, I anticipate an ultra competitive cycle.

Source for stats: https://report.lsac.org/VolumeSummary.aspx

That seems waaaay too high. In years prior (oh how idyllic and distant they seem now...), 242 was definitely enough for entry. People on the applicant profiles were getting in with 241.25s.

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4 minutes ago, TheMidnightOil said:

That seems waaaay too high. In years prior (oh how idyllic and distant they seem now...), 242 was definitely enough for entry. People on the applicant profiles were getting in with 241.25s.

I agree. If you look at the currently accepted students three of them (out of 17) have under a 247 index (245.53 - 246.25) even with the highest LSAT used.

Edited by Ttallent
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1 hour ago, spork123 said:

3. If you are saying that you could have taken the LSAT again had you known they would only look at the highest, here's the thing with this argument: while it may be harsh, you probably did not take it again because you were scared that you would get a lower score. If you were not confident that you would get a higher score, you should not be taking the LSAT again to begin with. The LSAT is not a joke, so this argument seems to me like an excuse that people are using to justify not taking the LSAT again. 

The problem is not that I was worried I would score lower, but that I didn't feel it would be worth it to spend the time and money retaking if the scores would be averaged. An increase in 5 points would only have counted as +2.5 which wasn't enough for me to retake but if I knew the full +5 would count, I definitely would.

It's also fair to be concerned about scoring lower on a second try anyway. The LSAT is difficult and unpredictable things happen.

Edited by hoinlaw
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59 minutes ago, TheMidnightOil said:

I wonder how many people didn’t even bother applying because they were misinformed about their low average score but high highest score. All because a webpage wasn’t updated.

This is honestly my beef with the situation. 

I think it is a good thing if they are changing the stupid averaging policy, but I really despise the lack of communication and outdated information on the admissions pages. 

Not that it will make much of an impact on me personally this year because I did shit on my January LSAT anyways, but I am sure that there are people who didn't apply to U of A, and would have otherwise done so, because they knew averaging would mean they weren't competitive enough. That is really annoying and pretty uncool IMO.

I have noticed a few schools are guilty of not keeping their admissions pages up to date and it just seems to lazy and frankly unfair to the people who pay $125+ to apply. It isn't an unreasonable ask to keep information updated and available.

Edited by gcyeg
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