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Just got back my LSAT score, and scored considerably worse than my PTs: 155. I already erased my first score with the Score Preview feature.

GPA:

  • L2: 3.2
  • B2: 3.8
  • B3: 3.5
  • cGPA: 3.3

Based on the schools I applied to: U of Alberta, U of Calgary, and U of Sask., my stats don't seem competitive. Though I do have 7 years of work experience and running a business.

I have one last semester left. After completing it, my L2 should rise to 3.8.

So I can either:

  1. Book another LSAT immediately. 
  2. Wait a few months to see if such schools I applied to actually decline admission, and then book another LSAT. This however, will decrease the amount of time I can study for the LSAT; I have to go back to work soon as my savings are running low.
  3. Do not waste any more time on the LSAT, and apply to law schools next cycle with the current score.

What would be the best option here? Admissions aside, my concern about the LSAT is how much time I've spent on it to get such a low score. I'm doubtful on how much meaningful improvement can be made with the amount of time it takes.

I don't care about going to the most prestigious school, but location matters. I happen to be close to the one school that takes the average LSAT score.

I'm located in in Edmonton, Alberta and have a spouse, and own property here. Because of this, I've been geographically limited to Alberta, hence my school selection to be close.

However, it seems unlikely I will be admitted to a school in Alberta given my L2 GPA; the average GPA for admission for previous years has been 3.8; LSAT score 160 for U of A; U of C is only slightly lower. Thus I may be forced to relocate.

 

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Personally I would book another score (although the lsats that schools this cycle take are pretty much over now, except for some that take feb). 155 is still a good score, but not too competitive for those law schools you said. 

The lsat is a tricky one, but I think it can be boosted. You definitely need to give yourself ample time to study, and even taking a short lsat course could help to focus and find new ways of looking at questions.

Good luck man!

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I think you should continue studying onwards from now for another lsat a few months from now. In my personal experience I had 3.7 cGPA and 3.7 L2 and didnt get admitted. Considering your cgpa is on the lower end I think your lsat score will be important. Work experience will definitely help your app a lot but if you really want to secure a space I would try to get at least a 158!

good luck you got this :)

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You probably need to consider what you'd need to change about/add to your study strategies/methods in order to get a higher score on a rewrite. Also, since the usual advice seems to be that it's not unusual for PTs to be higher than actual scores, you may need higher PT scores to increase the likelihood that your actual score will land in a range that's competitive for you. It might be a good idea to book another LSAT only if/when you're more confident you can get a competitive score. Wishing you the best of luck!

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I believe you can raise your score at least 3 points and make yourself competitive for those schools. With the right approach big gains can be seen on the LSAT. 
 

You may get better advice here if you outline what your study methods are. 
 

 

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@FirstGear In a post from 2018, I found a formula for UofA's supposed prediction indicator. It's: 22.5 x (GPA) + LSAT.

At the time, a 242 was considered an auto admit. I don't know how well that currently holds up, or how far below 242 offers tend to go.

However, with a 3.2 L2 you'd need an LSAT of 170 to reach 242. On the other hand, with a 3.8 L2 you'd only need an LSAT of 157. In fact, with a 155, a 3.87 L2 would get you in.

Therefore, I think the best thing you can do now is to focus on the current semester and to bring your GPA up as much as possible. You might even want to take some extra courses over the summer to boost your L2.

Also, if you're having trouble improving your LSAT score, I think you need to move beyond LSAT material. For example, no LSAT course or study guide alone is going to meaningfully improve your reading skills. If you're a university student now, you should have access to your school's research database. Use it to download some journal articles (scholarly & peer-reviewed) and try reading those. They're just as dense and complex as the RC passages.

Good luck!

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8 hours ago, Musashi said:

@FirstGear In a post from 2018, I found a formula for UofA's supposed prediction indicator. It's: 22.5 x (GPA) + LSAT.

At the time, a 242 was considered an auto admit. I don't know how well that currently holds up, or how far below 242 offers tend to go.

However, with a 3.2 L2 you'd need an LSAT of 170 to reach 242. On the other hand, with a 3.8 L2 you'd only need an LSAT of 157. In fact, with a 155, a 3.87 L2 would get you in.

Therefore, I think the best thing you can do now is to focus on the current semester and to bring your GPA up as much as possible. You might even want to take some extra courses over the summer to boost your L2.

Also, if you're having trouble improving your LSAT score, I think you need to move beyond LSAT material. For example, no LSAT course or study guide alone is going to meaningfully improve your reading skills. If you're a university student now, you should have access to your school's research database. Use it to download some journal articles (scholarly & peer-reviewed) and try reading those. They're just as dense and complex as the RC passages.

Good luck!

Basically on the LSAT, I was averaging on PTs -2 on the LG, and about -7 - -6 on the LR. RC was what was keeping my scores down.

My L2 is much worse than my B2, B3, and cGPA because my first degree was in math and economics, and I got a bunch of Cs and C+s in some core Math and Stats courses, such as Econometrics, Calculus III, Calculus IV, and some odd higher level probability courses. 

After this semester, none of those grades would be counted in my L2.

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15 hours ago, Seekingredemption said:

I believe you can raise your score at least 3 points and make yourself competitive for those schools. With the right approach big gains can be seen on the LSAT. 
 

You may get better advice here if you outline what your study methods are. 
 

 

Basically on the LSAT, I was averaging on PTs -2 on the LG, and about -7 - -6 on the LR. RC was what was keeping my scores down.

Historically I've been someone who is good at figuring things out and fixing problems, especially ones that are strictly mechanical. But I have a very poor memory and suffer from ADHD and nacrolepsy. So I am good at focusing on solving one puzzle or focusing on one thing, but not many things at once and trying to retain them.  In lectures it's not uncommon for me to retain only 1/10 of things said, but if I were to be given a written report or summary of it, I'd understand 90% of the content without assistance or asking additional questions.

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9 minutes ago, FirstGear said:

Basically on the LSAT, I was averaging on PTs -2 on the LG, and about -7 - -6 on the LR. RC was what was keeping my scores down.

Historically I've been someone who is good at figuring things out and fixing problems, especially ones that are strictly mechanical. But I have a very poor memory and suffer from ADHD and nacrolepsy. So I am good at focusing on solving one puzzle or focusing on one thing, but not many things at once and trying to retain them.  In lectures it's not uncommon for me to retain only 1/10 of things said, but if I were to be given a written report or summary of it, I'd understand 90% of the content without assistance or asking additional questions.

Okay this context helps a lot. I see why the RC section is giving you grief. Firstly, I would try to maximize your points on LR in this case. 
 

Here’s what I did to get good at LR. 
1. Take a full LR section timed. 
2. Do a “blind review”. I would go through every single question and force myself to reason out why a certain answer choice was right and why the others were wrong. I tried to get as close to certain that I was correct in my reasoning. 
3. Check the ACs and see where you went wrong. Pay special attention to questions you got wrong and figure out where you messed up in your reasoning. I would sometimes write out explanations for myself in a journal to burn it into my memory. 
 

If you have a 7sage subscription the platform makes it very easy to take problem sets and do this “blind review” method. They also have video answers for virtually all questions. 
 

This method was painstaking but it made answering LR questions on tests intuitive. It would be tough to not improve doing this. 
 

For RC I think you need to adopt a different approach. It is NOT about reading a passage and memorizing as much as you can. Like LR questions RC passages tend to follow certain molds. Getting familiar with these molds allows you to quote “see the forest and not get caught in the trees”.

What do I mean by this? 
 

Let’s take a science passage for example. Many break down as follows:

1.  There’s a phenomenon being described, ie: a certain type of plant has greater yields. 
2. There is a hypothesis to explain it introduced. Sometimes there are competing hypotheses. 
3. The author may take a side or choose not to. 
 

I haven’t studied the LSAT in a minute, but I think this describes a good chunk of LSAT passages. How does this help you?

When you start that convoluted science passage you don’t need to comprehend/memorize the details. You can ask “what’s the point here? What’s the phenomenon being described?” Cut to the chase and separate the wheat from the chaff. I was able to summarize paragraphs in a few words-much easier to remember and more efficient. 

I learned to read for structure. A paragraph could throw whatever complicated syntax and grammar it wanted at me, but if I knew the point the paragraph was driving at, ie: oh! This is the author disagreeing here, it was often sufficient to answer the questions. 

I don’t think I can really do this method justice over text here. I’m also just some guy who took this test.  But I encourage you to check out 7Sage and the RC section of the LSAT Trainer by Mike Kim. That’s where I got these ideas from. 
 

I think with a different approach you could see the improvement you need. If law school is the dream don’t let the LSAT stand in your way. 
 

All the best, and if you have questions let me know! 

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50 minutes ago, Seekingredemption said:

Okay this context helps a lot. I see why the RC section is giving you grief. Firstly, I would try to maximize your points on LR in this case. 
 

Here’s what I did to get good at LR. 
1. Take a full LR section timed. 
2. Do a “blind review”. I would go through every single question and force myself to reason out why a certain answer choice was right and why the others were wrong. I tried to get as close to certain that I was correct in my reasoning. 
3. Check the ACs and see where you went wrong. Pay special attention to questions you got wrong and figure out where you messed up in your reasoning. I would sometimes write out explanations for myself in a journal to burn it into my memory. 
 

If you have a 7sage subscription the platform makes it very easy to take problem sets and do this “blind review” method. They also have video answers for virtually all questions. 
 

 

This is what I've been doing, on 7Sage as well. I've only been studying for the LSAT (while being self-employed part-time, and in full-time studies for my Accounting degree) since October 2020, so that may be a reason for my struggles - especially when scored against people who've taken the LSAT multiple times and prepared for it for several months, or a year or more.

I will take your advice for RC. It's my weakest section and I spent the least amount of time on it.

At this stage I am waiting for law school responses. The sheer time required to prepare for the LSAT for very little improvement, is what concerns me. I have mortgage and other bills to pay, and can't afford to spend a lot of time for minimal gains.

In a best case scenario I can be admitted this cycle and not have to re-take the LSAT... LSAT Aside, my L2 seems to be what's hurting me - which won't be a concern after this April.

 

Edited by FirstGear

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