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Hegdis

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18 hours ago, Hegdis said:

 

4. Suits lied to you and "the LSATs" has become my personal albatross. It's just "the LSAT" ie "the Law School Admissions Test". Singular. Not plural.

 

My contracts instructor referred to them as “LSATs” recently. I almost dropped out. 

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2 hours ago, LawBlaw2019 said:

I only have one: No matter how you pronounce "prima facie" you're wrong. If someone tells you that you're right, they're also wrong. The sooner you accept this the smoother law school will be. 

i see your “prima facie” and raise you “ultra vires” 

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By and large, admissions committees don't care about your major, minor, double/triple/centuple major or honours specialization; you're better off getting a higher GPA. 

Edited by Tagger
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Some fun criminal law ones:

1. In BC, Manitoba, and New Brunswick, generally speaking the police do not approve charges. They forward a package to Crown seeking charge approval for recommended offences. This is different from the rest of Canada where the police can lay charges themselves.

2. The single most important document in any criminal file is the charging document. This is either termed The Information (Provincial level) or The Indictment (Superior Court level). As an extra fun thing to mess with your minds, Crown can proceed "indictably" on a provincial Information, which has to do with the sentence they are seeking, and prompts an election from the accused as to which level of court they want to have their trial in (provincial, superior judge alone, or superior judge and jury).

3. Even more fun, in BC we refer to our superior court as "Supreme Court". And Alberta calls one of their courts the Court of the Queen's Bench. In Ontario it's Superior Court. Good luck everyone!

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1 minute ago, Hegdis said:

Some fun criminal law ones:

1. In BC, Manitoba, and New Brunswick, generally speaking the police do not approve charges. They forward a package to Crown seeking charge approval for recommended offences. This is different from the rest of Canada where the police can lay charges themselves.

Alberta has increasingly been moving to Crown pre-charge approval following a successful pilot last year, too.

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2 hours ago, Hegdis said:

Some fun criminal law ones:

1. In BC, Manitoba, and New Brunswick, generally speaking the police do not approve charges. They forward a package to Crown seeking charge approval for recommended offences. This is different from the rest of Canada where the police can lay charges themselves.

 

Which system do you think is better for the accused? Or does it kind of work out the same? 

Clearly I know nothing about criminal law because I thought the rest of Canada was like B.C. Guess I learned something today. 😁

Edited by Starling

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5 minutes ago, Starling said:

Which system do you think is better for the accused? Or does it kind of work out the same? 

Clearly I know nothing about criminal law because I thought the rest of Canada was like B.C. Guess I learned something today. 😁

There is really no question that Crown charge approval is better. In the end, a Crown will look at the file and garbage files will get stayed or withdrawn even if the police are doing charge approval. But in systems where police lay charges they regularly lay ridiculous charges that no lawyer would approve, which obviously is a huge waste of resources from an administrative perspective in addition to being bad for the accused because they have charges hanging over them until a Crown looks at the file.

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