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Throwaway10

Chance? cGPA 3.6, 158 LSAT, L2 3.83

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I've got similar stats but have zero clue either, but good luck, I'm rooting for you! Will follow thread in case anyone can help chance us 

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On 2/3/2021 at 9:10 AM, Throwaway10 said:

Updated chance went from a 156 to a 158 lsat

GPA: 3.6

L2: 3.83

You have a good chance at the Common Law Section. I got in with similar stats (157 LSAT, 3.78 cGPA, 3.84 L2, and two masters) two years ago. Good luck!

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On 2/26/2021 at 10:05 PM, ArchivesandMuseums said:

You have a good chance at the Common Law Section. I got in with similar stats (157 LSAT, 3.78 cGPA, 3.84 L2, and two masters) two years ago. Good luck!

@ArchivesandMuseums Hi I have a similar stat as OP this cycle (157 LSAT / 3.90 cGPA by WES / Mature applicant). My transcript is from a foreign degree (new immigrant to Canada), and Admissions office replied me indicating that they will take WES-translated GPA as admission GPA. 

Currently, I haven't heard from any ON schools... I'm a bit afraid that my foreign educational background (and not speaking English as my first language) would be a disadvantage factor, rather than a "diversity" one...

What are the chances for me at Ottawa / Queens / Western given all the aforementioned factors? Thanks for your input.

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2 hours ago, EricD said:

@ArchivesandMuseums Hi I have a similar stat as OP this cycle (157 LSAT / 3.90 cGPA by WES / Mature applicant). My transcript is from a foreign degree (new immigrant to Canada), and Admissions office replied me indicating that they will take WES-translated GPA as admission GPA. 

Currently, I haven't heard from any ON schools... I'm a bit afraid that my foreign educational background (and not speaking English as my first language) would be a disadvantage factor, rather than a "diversity" one...

What are the chances for me at Ottawa / Queens / Western given all the aforementioned factors? Thanks for your input.

At least at uOttawa law, English as your second language would not undermine your admission chances. See this: "If English is not your first language, the LSAT, while relevant, may carry less weight in the Admission Committee’s evaluation of the application." (https://commonlaw.uottawa.ca/en/students/admissions/admissions-criteria).

Overall, I think that you have a good chance at the Common Law Section as the law school admits a lot of new immigrants and mature students every year. Your cGPA is also very strong.

Relatively weak chances at Western and Queen's because the two law school are more difficult to get in compared with uOttawa law. In my view, you may have a better chance at Western law than Queen's as Western seems to place a great emphasis on cGPA these days. Good luck!

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18 hours ago, ArchivesandMuseums said:

At least at uOttawa law, English as your second language would not undermine your admission chances. See this: "If English is not your first language, the LSAT, while relevant, may carry less weight in the Admission Committee’s evaluation of the application." (https://commonlaw.uottawa.ca/en/students/admissions/admissions-criteria).

Overall, I think that you have a good chance at the Common Law Section as the law school admits a lot of new immigrants and mature students every year. Your cGPA is also very strong.

Relatively weak chances at Western and Queen's because the two law school are more difficult to get in compared with uOttawa law. In my view, you may have a better chance at Western law than Queen's as Western seems to place a great emphasis on cGPA these days. Good luck!

oh that's comforting news for me! thanks for your reply😄

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