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dimsum1

7sage study schedule

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I created my study schedule and for an Aug 2021 LSAT, it's suggesting 34 hours/wk.  There is no way I can carve out that with my FT job and life.  

Is there a more reasonable schedule (say 8-10 hours a week, maybe 12?) 

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The 7Sage study schedule is waaaaay overestimated. They give way more time than necessary for each lesson and homework, and like 12 hours per PT, assuming you do every PT after 35, or something like that. I wouldn’t worry about it . Start working through the curriculum at your own pace and adjust from there. You’ll have more than enough time before august. 

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1 hour ago, rebeccamtl said:

The 7Sage study schedule is waaaaay overestimated. They give way more time than necessary for each lesson and homework, and like 12 hours per PT, assuming you do every PT after 35, or something like that. I wouldn’t worry about it . Start working through the curriculum at your own pace and adjust from there. You’ll have more than enough time before august. 

This. 
 

Also, you don’t need to do every single problem set they have. Just do some until you feel you have the hang of it. 
 

It’s also nice to have plenty of problem sets left to come back to when you’re in the practice test phase and can more readily identify areas where you need additional practice. 

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4 minutes ago, Seekingredemption said:

This. 
 

Also, you don’t need to do every single problem set they have. Just do some until you feel you have the hang of it. 
 

It’s also nice to have plenty of problem sets left to come back to when you’re in the practice test phase and can more readily identify areas where you need additional practice. 

Thanks for the advice!  I was doing ok on the early sets until the harder ones, and I'm a completionist so I feel super weird about not finishing something on the schedule.  I get the 3 "dot" question difficulty ones most of the time, the 4-dot ones frequently, but the 5-dot is straight up guessing.

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1 hour ago, dimsum1 said:

Thanks for the advice!  I was doing ok on the early sets until the harder ones, and I'm a completionist so I feel super weird about not finishing something on the schedule.  I get the 3 "dot" question difficulty ones most of the time, the 4-dot ones frequently, but the 5-dot is straight up guessing.

Ahh yes. I know that feeling all too well. I determined that getting hung up on the five dot difficulty questions was not really worth it for a couple of reasons. Firstly, unless you’re aiming for a top, top score, you don’t even need to get the majority of those questions right. Secondly, they were demoralizing and would at points put me off of studying for the day. 
 

This is just my opinion, but I think your time is better spent getting a good feel for each question type-not trying to « perfect » one then move on to another.

Keep in mind that you’ll see most of your gains during the PT phase. Problem sets are not really simulating the LSAT, and you need to be simulating game day to perform on game day. 
 

It’s tough but that completionist mindset could be holding you back. 
 

Good luck with your studies. Go slay that dragon.

Edited by Seekingredemption
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1 hour ago, Seekingredemption said:

Ahh yes. I know that feeling all too well. I determined that getting hung up on the five dot difficulty questions was not really worth it for a couple of reasons. Firstly, unless you’re aiming for a top, top score, you don’t even need to get the majority of those questions right. Secondly, they were demoralizing and would at points put me off of studying for the day. 
 

This is just my opinion, but I think your time is better spent getting a good feel for each question type-not trying to « perfect » one then move on to another.

Keep in mind that you’ll see most of your gains during the PT phase. Problem sets are not really simulating the LSAT, and you need to be simulating game day to perform on game day. 
 

It’s tough but that completionist mindset could be holding you back. 
 

Good luck with your studies. Go slay that dragon.

Thanks for the advice and pep talk!

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JY from 7Sage makes the argument that, if the LSAT is important to you, you will do this. He is aware his schedule is more demanding than other study programs.

If you cannot do a 34 hour per week study schedule, he would probably suggest taking more months to complete the program. Waiting until next summer to write the LSAT is not out of the question from this point of view, not is waiting until the summer of 2023!

I, myself, am in your shoes. I agree with JY in theory, but in reality, I skimped massively on my study time. I am now waiting to get accepted to a law school with an LSAT below 160. I believe I would have a higher LSAT is I had done what JY told me, but I could not get the time off work. 

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On ‎1‎/‎26‎/‎2021 at 4:33 AM, SNAILS said:

skimped massively on my study time. I am now waiting to get accepted to a law school with an LSAT below 160. I believe I would have a higher LSAT is I had done what JY told me, but I could not get the time off work. 

This is exactly me too.

I'm definitely not trying to make it a competition, but I averaged about 10-15 hours a week of studying on top of 2 jobs and volunteering and I really really wish I would have dedicated more time. I have so many regrets looking back not just doing an extra hour after work, or taking too many days off.

I would say 2-3 hours after work/on your lunch break and then study for a good chunk of hours on your days off/the weekend still allows you to have a life! It's also reasonable to take days off if you are feeling burnt out. I would usually take 1 day off during the week/after work to just relax. 34 hours a week is insane, but if you want to get into law school I think it's better to dedicate the time now instead looking back in regret :( It also doesn't hurt to maybe wait until the next exam, because even if you need to re-write you have a bunch more options as January is usually the latest write for admission the same year.  

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I should clarify what I think about studying 34 hours per week while working full time.

JY from 7Sage.com says that you need to study over 600 hours to achieve your maximum LSAT score potential, and I believe this to be true. I believe this in spite of a lot of posters on these forums achieving or claiming to achieve a 170 LSAT with very little studying. Generally, normal people require more study time.

JY also says that you should be willing to put in whatever work it takes if law school is important to you. I believe this to be true.

Life has taught me that a human being is generally limited to 50-60 hours per week of actual, productive work. So if you work 40+ hours, you simply do not have 34 hours left. If you deprive yourself of sleep and/or down time, you will burn out.

So what do you do? You study those 10 or 12 hours per week as the OP originally suggested. You take the LSAT in August with the full understanding that you are not "done" studying, but rather have taken an early attempt at the LSAT to see if you score well enough.

If you are not happy with your score, keep studying and retake in Sept, Nov, or Jan. Keep studying and retake it in 36 months, if necessary.

An alternative plan would be to reduce your hours of full time work to allow more LSAT study time.  But I can see how this would have financial consequences for most people.

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I think JY’s practice exams will give you a pretty good indication of what you’re capable of scoring closer to test time. If you are close to your target score, write in Aug. if you are not, consider cancelling/rescheduling. 
 

I studied 8 hrs a day, 6 days a week for 60 days and scored 158 on my first attempt. I was practicing in the low 160s. I am pretty anxious test taker. Some people who have taken logical reasoning in undergrad may need far less study time. It totally depends. 

Do many, many practice exams under proper timed conditions and that will be your answer as to whether or not your ready :)

best of luck! 

Edited by optimistic
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