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Undergrad Victory Lap

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I had an idea while replying to another thread where a poster had a low GPA but still had a year of undergrad left. The goal of a person in such a case would be to get A's an A+'s in the final year in order to boost L2 (for schools that take L2) and to boost B20 (for Ryerson).

A victory lap would be where a person who has completed 4 years of undergrad study does not request to graduate, but rather enrolls in further courses in a fifth year in order to boost GPA.

The obvious critique of such a plan would be the cost and time commitment of taking these courses. However, if it were simply to boost B20, it would require a relatively light course load over a single semester, thus lessening the time and cost.

Boosting L2 would be trickier as it would require all the time and cost associated with with a full two semesters of university study. But I suspect some people here would be willing to go to considerable lengths to get into a good (or any) law school.

Delaying acceptance to law school is a non-factor at this point in time, since Sept 2022 is the earliest realistic option right now for anyone who has not yet applied to law school.

The lack of a full course load would be a factor at many schools, but would it be a factor when boosting B20 for Ryerson?

Maybe everyone is already aware of this possibility. Maybe this idea is faulty for some reason I have not considered.

/shrug

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I think the main reason it isn't an automatic go-to is that it requires sinking in more time and money, often eats up hours one could spend working, and they may not even be accepted into law school in the end anyway. The desire to get a 80%+ average is different said than done (not impossible, obviously). It can also be a bigger commitment than redoing the LSAT. 

It seems to be common now for people to take five years to finish undergrad, at least at my university. Some for reduced workload, and some to have a better shot at landing needed research experience for grad studies. But planning to take five years from the beginning is different than hitting fourth year, realizing you want to go to [insert professional program here] but your grades aren't good enough. Now the pressure is on to make a decision. Moreover, for those whose parents are paying for the education, I assume the incentive would be to not take an extra year on a maybe. 

Because Ryerson is the only place that does B20, it probably isn't worth it in many people's heads to increase their shot at just one school, versus increasing one's L2 and broadening their chances at more places. So I assume a full-time year would be what most people default to when they consider more studies. That's a bigger ask. 

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I kind of built this into my studies. I took 5 years, and a number of classes I didn’t need to graduate, mostly because they looked really neat and I knew I would enjoy them. I mostly got A’s in those classes. If someone is in a somewhat free form program they can easily build in some electives/gpa boosters along the way. Sort of like lowering ones course load without actually lowering it. It did cost a bit more to do it that way, but I don’t really have any regrets. Some of my favourite classes were classes I didn’t need to graduate, and taking them probably helped me get into law school. 

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Think about the opportunity cost of a year. Writing a short story anthology? Volunteering for the peace corps with your undergrad? Work experience? Unless there's absolutely no way of getting in with your current transcript, you'd be better off studying for the LSAT in your spare time. 

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I did a victory lap haha. Just took 2 classes a semester for the year. But it was useful as  these 4 classes bumped out an average exchange semester from my L2.

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Honestly there is more to an additional year than just taking extra courses to boost your GPA. I know I opted for an extra year because I double-majored, but also because I recognized my limits. By adding an extra year to my degree I was able to reduce my course load, which not only gave me more time to study but also gave me more time to do stuff I enjoyed. Not to mention how helpful it was in my first semester while I was writing all of my law school applications to have only had 3 courses! Long story short, it was incredibly helpful for my mental health! The last thing I want before going to law school (hopefully lol) is to have torn myself to shreds in my last year of my undergrad.

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