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meow2121

Cancel Jan 2021 LSAT or not?

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hi.

So, I took the LSAT this morning and it was relatively more difficult than the last LSAT I took in November (scored a 157). 
- RC was easier than expected (looms, simulation tech usage in courts, music iconography, physics v chem)

- LR was dense from the beginning. I honestly feel like I bombed it.

- Logic Games were not bad. Usually do well in this section and get -3/-4 overall. except I had to guess 5 ish questions in total (game about buildings and archaeology) Bc time and difficulty.

MY QUESTION: I have already spent money applying this term to ON law schools. I really do not want to screw up my chances even more. I understand that many would advise to apply again next year but that is not in my control until I find out the outcomes of my applications this year. I really hope to get in this cycle because of my grades and other application components.
 

so that being said, would you guys advise to cancel my Jan 2021 score? Or keep it and wait to see how I do? I really don’t know if I performed well enough to get a score higher than 157 (but the potential and prayed upon curve based on Reddit discussions gives me a sense of hope). I know most schools look at the HIGHEST score but 157 isn’t the bestest score to begin with. And if I score lower than that, I assume it will make the application weaker.

 

my guy feeling right now is muddled too so I’m trying to spend more time contemplating before cancelling.

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I keep seeing this sort of question in various threads and I have no clue where the confusion keeps coming from. You have absolutely nothing to lose by keeping your score, as every school in the country takes your highest. You've spent the money already, just keep it.

In terms of the LSAT curve, if it's a factor, it only impacts 1 or 2 points. Reason being, despite the difference in sections, the difficulty across the 3 are made to balance out. For example, you mentioned you got a dense and difficult LR but a reasonable LG. Another applicant could've got the exact opposite (hard LG, easier LR), so the difficulty level balances out all the same.

Edited by Leafs2021
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17 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

You've spent the money already, just keep it.

In terms of the LSAT curve, if it's a factor, it only impacts 1 or 2 points. Reason being, despite the difference in sections, the difficulty across the 3 are made to balance out. For example, you mentioned you got a dense and difficult LR but a reasonable LG. Another applicant could've got the exact opposite (hard LG, easier LR), so the difficulty level balances out all the same.

thank you for your advice. I guess the confusion just stems from my deteriorating confidence as the application season progresses lol. leaning towards keeping it.

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43 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

every school in the country takes your highest.

I think Alberta averages your scores (it might be Calgary?). Either way, I’m pretty sure there’s only one in Canada that doesn’t take highest. Just including it in case OP is applying to any of those. 

Edited by navyblue11
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U of A is the school that averages LSAT scores. U of C takes your highest.

I creeped your history and it looks like you only applied to Ontario schools, so I wouldn't worry about it.

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I agree with all the above comments about not cancelling unless your dream school is U of A. If it makes you feel better, I personally found my actual flex test significantly harder than all the practice tests I did (I thought I bombed it) but I ended up scoring on the upper end of my PT scores. Something that helped ease my nerves after the test was listening to the PowerScore podcast about my specific FLEX test. The podcast talks about the relative difficulty of each section on the test and it helped me gauge the difficulty of my sections / if the curve was gonna help me out. Good luck!

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