Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
HeavyMetaI

Transcript update without all grades?

Recommended Posts

So I got back all but one of my grades for the fall semester. Would it be sensible to send in a transcript update now, and then once again when my last mark is out, or to wait for the last grade altogether? I want to avoid running the risk of waiting too long in case the grade comes out after round two. Conversely, I am also afraid that the admissions committee will 'miss' my second transcript update after seeing my first. Any advice is appreciated!

Edited by HeavyMetaI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much will the update affect your GPA? My instinct would be to wait, but if you want the update to count towards round 2, then I can't see the harm to it except that you're paying for each submission so it's an extra cost. I'm a 0L though, so maybe someone with more experience would be able to chime in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Assuming you're in 4th year of your bachelor's, I don't think they'll consider these grades because they won't be part of your B3 since you haven't completed the year. So I wouldn't worry about it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • On this site I regularly see people with LSAT scores 20-30 points lower than mine making ridiculous assertions about the amount of work that is supposedly required to get a top score. By contrast my personal experience was that the prep required to get a 99th percentile LSAT score consisted of learning basic logic game diagramming and writing a handful of practice tests. I see people with scores in the 150s knowing all the names of the different types of logical reasoning questions and discussing the logic behind them in terms I never learned and don't understand. All I know is if you put the test in front of me I intuitively understand what almost all of the answers are, but I couldn't do a good job of articulating why--the answers simply seem self-evident and to be taken for granted. Just chiming in because your statement squares with my experience (although I didn't reach 177). But by and large people with mediocre scores invariably claim that the LSAT is all about effort and just don't want to believe that innate aptitude has anything to do with it, because they tend to view it as an attack on their intelligence in general. (Just so I don't seem like a totally arrogant douche, everyone: for what it's worth I've put in serious effort trying to learn instruments and second languages and my innate aptitude in both of those areas is abysmal--I found such endeavors nearly impossible. Also the innate LSAT aptitude did not translate into innate law school aptitude, and I certainly would have preferred the latter. But yeah, the fact that I suck at other things but can effortlessly get an LSAT score in the 170s just emphasizes how much of it is innate. And the degree to which there are different kinds of intelligences that people have varying aptitudes for. The LSAT is irrelevant to me now in practical terms but I do find the subject interesting from a psychological perspective.)
    • The vast majority of people that score 170+ and post here put in a fraction of the effort the people grinding through the 150s and low 160s do. And I’m sure a ton of those grinders put in as much effort as is humanly possible into studying without having an innate grasp of the LSAT. But the people scoring 177-180 for example? Probably putting in some of the least effort into studying.
    • I'm really torn on this debate. LSAT prep companies and books argue that anyone can score over 170 but there's an obvious conflict of interest there, and some people claim that it's limited to someone's innate ability. Nature vs. nurture.
    • Now when you're on the bench you'll think harder before you set a precedent
    • [Gasping for air as 84-year-old hiker with telescoping walking poles waltzes past me. Mumbles feeble greeting.] I feel like y'all are just trolling me at this point for this comment in this post  

×
×
  • Create New...