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lawstudent2006

Is there a service where I can practice the Flex exam?

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I don't feel confident dong 3 sections and then scaling my score as if it was a 4 section test because the LR might have been of unequal difficulty and skewed my results. Is there a service where I can practice 3 section  flex tests that reliably reflect the score? I think 7sage has something like this but it costs quite a bit b/c it includs all the prep and lessons as well which I dont need.

 

tl:dr: Can I buy premade flex tests to practice on?

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There’s a couple flex versions on Law Hub, through LSAC. I’m not sure if the paid version has more flex tests, or if the rest are all full LSATs.

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LSAT Demon has an option to take historical 4-section tests in a flex format; I found the score conversion to 3 sections to be reliable, and the UI resembles the flex to enough of an extent that the muscle memory transfers over (in my experience)

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The only reason I can see why you would want to do the FLEX version in practice is to try to predict how you will do on the actual LSAT. 

But you can do that almost as accurately yourself as you can through a simulated FLEX put together by a third party -- that third party would have to make a simulated FLEX out of a regular LSAT on your behalf, so it's not an exact science either. 

For study purposes, you'd be better off doing the whole thing.

I suggest doing all 4 sections of every PT you have bought and paid for, or else you are wasting a quarter of every PT. Every fresh PT is a valuable study resource.

To deal with our concern that some LG sections are harder than others, you could average your score of the two LG sections on every 4 section PT you take.

For myself, LG was my weakest section, so my FLEX scores were always lower than my 4 section regular PTs.

Edited by SNAILS
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On 1/9/2021 at 4:14 PM, lugubriousgame said:

LSAT Demon has an option to take historical 4-section tests in a flex format; I found the score conversion to 3 sections to be reliable, and the UI resembles the flex to enough of an extent that the muscle memory transfers over (in my experience)

I'd second this. I used this service for my flex studying as well, and the layout is not identical to the actual exam but is similar enough. I also found the scoring to be pretty consistent. It is fairly expensive (in my opinion), but I thought it was worth it. 

Edited by lawlawlaw99662

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7Sage has an option to stimulate the Lsat Flex with past LSATs. 

Edited by FirstGear

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