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How saturated is the job market in Canada? Job prospects?

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On 12/31/2020 at 2:32 PM, QuincyWagstaff said:

That’s possibly one of the worst arguments for going to law school. 

That reason is why I want to go into law school. My dreams to one day become an ethics commissioner will only happen if I go to law school. Will probably have to work for the law society first (my friends tell me that lawyers will hate me but I am a necessary service). 

On 12/31/2020 at 3:20 PM, Toad said:

Many of the alternative careers people cite for those with a law degree are either also extremely difficult to get into and/or have additional requirements to get into other than merely a JD.

A JD can be a nightmare for finding non-law related work in many cases as employers are scared you will jump ship. This is especially the case if the position isn't what people refer to as "legal adjacent."

There's almost never a time where it is a good idea to get a JD if you are not planning to become a lawyer. There will almost always be an alternative pathway to just about any non-legal position that is cheaper and less time consuming than a JD and that won't require you to go through herculean efforts to convince any recruiter that you aren't a flight risk for the first 3-5 years of your non-legal career.

Where I used to work, there was an excessive amount of people that have JDs and didn't article. Some articled, and left practice. In some public service work, the law degree makes it easier to get in. Especially on policy teams. There is only so many lawyers and legislative writers. Having a policy analyst that can interpret things correctly can be helpful (sometimes). 

I wanted to agree that going and getting a law degree to enter a career that does not require would be ridiculous, but then I reflect on my path. I have only done what I have done due to my unique experience, and I have noticed that the first job title on your resume will influence your path. It often isn't about your knowledge, it is other's assumptions. 

Almost all of the admin staff around where I was had Bachelors degrees (and not history but business and other useful things), some had masters, and one had a PhD. The problem was that because they started off in those admin roles, they were typecast as only being able to do that. It really limited their progression. For these people to escape this, they would be the type that would need to do a JD. An MPP/MPA will get you in to the feds on co-op. Less so in the Province (BC). Experience is king here. 

For those looking for atypical careers that have a legal background, consider finding people who are already in those jobs on linkedin and ask how they got there. There might be another path that is less arduous. 

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12 minutes ago, OyVey said:

-Snip-

I don't even know where to start with this one.

All I'll say is that you have posted a number of rather odd things about what you expect law school to be and what you expect to get out of it. I seriously question whether it is the right call for you, but it's your dime.

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When people mention that they want to go to law school to have an "alternative" legal career, what jobs are they referring to? Could it be that some people who go into the legal profession assuming they will have an "alternative" legal career simply don't realize that the career they are envisioning (research, policy, soliciting opinions, what have you) usually falls under the ambit of most practicing lawyers? 

Edited by capitalttruth

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9 hours ago, CleanHands said:

I don't even know where to start with this one.

All I'll say is that you have posted a number of rather odd things about what you expect law school to be and what you expect to get out of it. I seriously question whether it is the right call for you, but it's your dime.

I have over 10 years experience in varied professional jobs in an array of different work areas and seniority levels. What I say is informed by those things. In my work environments, especially when it comes to education, I have seen so many go and get degrees which were not actually necessary thinking it would help them progress. 

I would never in my life pursue a JD if there was a different but easier path to getting where I want. There is a reason that I am pursuing this now in my 30s versus earlier. It has become very apparent in the past couple of years that this needs to be the path and I keep getting led back to the JD.  

My end goal for the types of positions I want are not specifically legal positions, but I will strongly benefit from having practiced law or at minimum got a law degree. Think human rights commissioners, ombudspersons, ethics commissioners, etc. There are some who have become these without a legal background, but it was a hard slog and often spending years working in the non-profit sector with wages that do not offer financial stability in my region. 

If admitted, I do plan on articling and practicing law. I have zero desire and need to go back to non-lawyer policy and advocacy positions (and the like) to get to where I need. 
 

and also to add some other perspective, I know my reasons for pursuing law are very different than many here. Many would ask why on earth I would leave my job to go pursue law. It isn't just a financial decision. It is based on what I want to do and what makes me happy. I used to work in a position in a non-law firm legal position. I reflect on that experience and doing that work made me happiest. I had a very frustrating experience last year where I knew someone was making a mistake and doing something illegal, and I escalated it. I was told, "I trust our lawyer" when that lawyer didn't even specialize in that area of law. It was that moment and others just like it, I realized that even though I have an exceptional amount of knowledge related to specific areas of law, my opinion will always be secondary to our staff lawyers. So become one of the lawyers. In general, when working with external clients, I see how they place a lawyer's opinion above mine when the lawyer's advice is so wrong. I do not think that the general public always understands that lawyers do not know every law (all of the work that I have done in my professional life intersects with some sort of legislation/regulation/bylaw/policy/guidelines so my knowledge in some areas has become very deep). 

 

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Well, go to it. Sounds like your reasons are as good as anyone’s and it also sounds like you aren’t actually looking for advice here. 

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