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Frazer99

Moving out of province next year worth it?

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Title says it all, but my two biggest choices right now are Queen's and Dalhousie, and if you asked me a couple of months ago I would've said that I'm leaning more towards Queen's, but now I'm not so sure it's worth it to move away from home (I'm from Halifax). I eventually want to end up in Ontario (and I know I can regardless of which school I go to), but with the pandemic I really don't know how to justify packing up and moving from NS to Kingston. I realize the aim is for everyone to be vaccinated by the end of next summer, but I doubt COVID will be gone just like that and I doubt even more that law schools will hold in-person classes next year. Given the current circumstances, what does everyone think are the odds classes would be in person next September, and is there any way to justify moving to another province?  

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Seeing as though most people will have gotten the vaccine by the end of the summer, I'd be shocked if things weren't more or less back to what they were pre-Covid. You may still have to wear a mask in certain places, and class sizes may vary, but I'm sure most of your classes will have an in-person lecture.

Based on what I've read from this forum, at least half of the students at most law schools ended up moving wherever they initially planned so I wouldn't be hesitant to move if I were you. I'm looking forward to moving out for law school too and the last thing that's gonna stop me is a slightly worse version of the flu

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I suspect we'll have a better idea in the late spring whether classes will be in-person (or not). Have you been accepted to both schools, or is this more of a hypothetical? In addition to attending school in the province where you want to practice, consider the added cost of relocation and living in Ontario. 

10 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

I'm looking forward to moving out for law school too and the last thing that's gonna stop me is a slightly worse version of the flu

I'd also refrain from adopting this sort of reasoning. For you the virus may present it self as slightly worse than the flu, but tell that to the 14,500+ Canadian families whose loved one won't be at the dinner table this Christmas, or the 320,000+ families south of the border. Fuck that logic.

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1 minute ago, Phaedrus said:

I suspect we'll have a better idea in the late spring whether classes will be in-person (or not). Have you been accepted to both schools, or is this more of a hypothetical? In addition to attending school in the province where you want to practice, consider the added cost of relocation and living in Ontario. 

I'd also refrain from adopting this sort of reasoning. For you the virus may present it self as slightly worse than the flu, but tell that to the 14,500+ Canadian families whose loved one won't be at the dinner table this Christmas, or the 320,000+ families south of the border. Fuck that logic.

It's a slightly worse version of the flu whether you choose to believe it or not. People die all the time and more often to various other ailments. Just because certain age groups are more at risk than others, and that very few people are dying doesn't take away from the fact that the virus is slightly worse than the common flu 

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23 minutes ago, Ryn said:

lol, no:

More than 3x the death rate, and 10x more for adolescents who were hospitalized. And that's just one study's information. There is plenty of information out there that shows, no, this is not just "slightly worse" than the common flu. Do you think our global reaction would be as significant as it is if it were just slightly worse than the common flu?

If you want a reason to not care about the significance of this pandemic and about your fellow humans dying, surely you can pick something more defensible than "slightly worse than the common flu". Something like, "people are dying? Who gives a shit. They're all old and feeble anyway." At least then you'd be honest about how you think.

How many people do you think would be hospitalized if there was no vaccine for the common flu? The number of people that are dying has less to do with the severity of the virus and more to do with the fact that there isn't a cure/vaccine. Do you have any remote idea how fucked we would be if the virus was more severe? It's a blessing that the worst part of the virus is how quickly it spreads and not how quickly it could kill. That's why I stated that it's nothing more than a common flu to me and the majority of others. For what it's worth I've also had COVID, so I'm speaking from experience.

Regardless, I'm not going to argue with you on a forum lol. Your opinion differs from mine and that's fine, nothing you really say is going to shift my viewpoint so I'm going to tag out of the discussion right here

 

Edited by Leafs2021

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4 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

How many people do you think would be hospitalized if there was no vaccine for the common flu? The number of people that are dying has less to do with the severity of the virus and more to do with the fact that there isn't a cure/vaccine. Do you have any remote idea how fucked we would be if the virus was more severe? It's a blessing that the worst part of the virus is how quickly it spreads and not how quickly it could kill. 

Assuming this is all true, by your own logic, until we have an effective vaccine coronavirus is still a major public health concern. We've had an influenza pandemic, and even though a vaccine was later developed, that doesn't mean that it wasn't a health threat before then. Also, just because something may not kill you doesn't mean there aren't long-lasting health effects. 

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11 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

How many people do you think would be hospitalized if there was no vaccine for the common flu? The number of people that are dying has less to do with the severity of the virus and more to do with the fact that there isn't a cure/vaccine. Do you have any remote idea how fucked we would be if the virus was more severe? It's a blessing that the worst part of the virus is how quickly it spreads and not how quickly it could kill. That's why I stated that it's nothing more than a common flu to me and the majority of others. For what it's worth I've also had COVID, so I'm speaking from experience.

Regardless, I'm not going to argue with you on a forum lol. Your opinion differs from mine and that's fine, nothing you really say is going to shift my viewpoint so I'm going to tag out of the discussion right here

 

I was positive this bloke was trolling, but no... may Allah protect us.

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16 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

That's why I stated that it's nothing more than a common flu to me and the majority of others. For what it's worth I've also had COVID, so I'm speaking from experience.

I've flown in a plane, so I'm an aerodynamics expert now. 

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4 minutes ago, Liavas said:

Assuming this is all true, by your own logic, until we have an effective vaccine coronavirus is still a major public health concern. We've had an influenza pandemic, and even though a vaccine was later developed, that doesn't mean that it wasn't a health threat before then. Also, just because something may not kill you doesn't mean there aren't long-lasting health effects. 

We already have an effective vaccine being administered. 

Not saying it's not a public health concern but by the time I hope to attend in 2021, things will have simmered down. Show me those long lasting health effects btw,.

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20 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

We already have an effective vaccine being administered. 

Not saying it's not a public health concern but by the time I hope to attend in 2021, things will have simmered down. Show me those long lasting health effects btw,.

COVID-19 (coronavirus): Long-term effects - Mayo Clinic

You might want to read that. You might also benefit from visiting the Pandemic discussion in the OT forum. 

I will also include the usual reminder that posts here are forever, and the legal community is an amazingly small one. Think about what you post here. 

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4 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

We already have an effective vaccine being administered. 

Not saying it's not a public health concern but by the time I hope to attend in 2021, things will have simmered down. Show me those long lasting health effects btw,.

Yes, and with any luck, the vaccine schedule will go smoothly. But your original phrasing didn't suggest your travel plans have anything to do with whether the virus is still a threat:

3 hours ago, Leafs2021 said:

I'm looking forward to moving out for law school too and the last thing that's gonna stop me is a slightly worse version of the flu

erinl2 has already given you a link to some long-term health effects, but you have the internet just like the rest of us. I'm not going to write a thesis for something you can take a couple minutes of your time to look up.

By the way, if we're exchanging anecdotes: I haven't had COVID-19, but I have had the flu which I caught a few years back. I'm a young, healthy person with no related health concerns, and I coughed for six months. "Slightly worse" wouldn't make me feel any better about the pandemic even if it were true.

 

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46 minutes ago, Leafs2021 said:

How many people do you think would be hospitalized if there was no vaccine for the common flu? The number of people that are dying has less to do with the severity of the virus and more to do with the fact that there isn't a cure/vaccine. Do you have any remote idea how fucked we would be if the virus was more severe? It's a blessing that the worst part of the virus is how quickly it spreads and not how quickly it could kill. That's why I stated that it's nothing more than a common flu to me and the majority of others. For what it's worth I've also had COVID, so I'm speaking from experience.

Regardless, I'm not going to argue with you on a forum lol. Your opinion differs from mine and that's fine, nothing you really say is going to shift my viewpoint so I'm going to tag out of the discussion right here

 

Even assuming that your bullshit is true, (and it isn't) A virus that is 4 times as contagious but half as deadly is going too kill more People.

Also this isn't a matter of opinion it's fact. Just because you got a mild cases doesn't mean that literally hundreds of thousands of people haven't had it much worse than you. Your statements are impressively ignorant.

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7 hours ago, Frazer99 said:

Title says it all, but my two biggest choices right now are Queen's and Dalhousie, and if you asked me a couple of months ago I would've said that I'm leaning more towards Queen's, but now I'm not so sure it's worth it to move away from home (I'm from Halifax). I eventually want to end up in Ontario (and I know I can regardless of which school I go to), but with the pandemic I really don't know how to justify packing up and moving from NS to Kingston. I realize the aim is for everyone to be vaccinated by the end of next summer, but I doubt COVID will be gone just like that and I doubt even more that law schools will hold in-person classes next year. Given the current circumstances, what does everyone think are the odds classes would be in person next September, and is there any way to justify moving to another province?  

To address your concerns outside of this debate, according to Dr. Fauci we may only need to achieve a 50% immunization rate to start to see numbers go down and about 75-85% to start achieving herd immunity (this is from an American context, keep in mind, but I still feel it's a good framework to look to for now as Canadians). Although hitting these percentages doesn't automatically mean it's safe to start weaning down restrictions, it is a useful timeline to refer to in the coming months, or at least until they learn more about what's to be expected here in Canada and given any new developments. 

As long as a good amount of people in Ontario take both doses of the vaccine and continue to follow precautions from here to the end of the summer, it may be possible for you to be able to come to Kingston safely, especially since schools outside the GTA seem to be getting hit less hard than those inside and generally only seem to stay in the "green" and "yellow" zones of restrictions (Western seems to be an exception to this though, idk about Queens).

https://www.vox.com/coronavirus-covid19/2020/12/15/22176555/anthony-fauci-covid-19-vaccine-herd-immunity-goal

Edited by navyblue11

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On 12/23/2020 at 7:56 PM, Ryn said:

I mean, 320,000 people have died in the US so far in a year. That's more than all of the Allied military deaths in WWII, all of the US deaths in Vietnam, the Korean War, and the Gulf War combined. And those were soldiers in circumstances where death is expected. In Canada, almost 15,000 people have died, and worldwide nearly 1.7 million have lost their lives.

I agree with everything you said about Covid, but I'm a bit of a WWII nerd so I'd just like to point out that the Soviet Union lost over 8 million military personnel (a conservative estimate) in the war. I get that you were probably referring to the western Allies, but the sacrifice of our comrades in the east shouldn't be forgotten! 

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On 12/23/2020 at 9:26 AM, Leafs2021 said:

It's a slightly worse version of the flu whether you choose to believe it or not. People die all the time and more often to various other ailments. Just because certain age groups are more at risk than others, and that very few people are dying doesn't take away from the fact that the virus is slightly worse than the common flu 

You're an idiot.

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Well this quickly devolved into something quite different than I intended. I know better than to take COVID-invalidators seriously, so it appears I may have to hold off before making a reasonable decision about my moving plans :) 

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1 hour ago, Frazer99 said:

Well this quickly devolved into something quite different than I intended. I know better than to take COVID-invalidators seriously, so it appears I may have to hold off before making a reasonable decision about my moving plans :) 

I'm sorry for partially derailing your thread. I have some actual contributions, but keep in mind that I'm just an applicant, and most of my knowledge has been gleaned from obsessively searching this website's various topics.

It is, of course, very difficult to predict the extent to which Fall 2021 will be in-person. From my limited perspective, I anticipate at least some in-person components being involved, which is important for getting to know your law school peers. I think it would be safe to say that your second and third years of law school will be at least somewhat in-person, which is pretty useful for building your network.

The most repeated advice I've seen for the selection of a law school is, all else being equal, to pick one in the province in which you'd like to practice. You build connections in law school (and are yourself a connection to others) that you can leverage as you enter your actual career. I would say that -- if Ontario is definitely the province you'd want to practice in -- to go to an Ontario law school. I don't think the possibility of an online first year is enough reason to sway you away from Queens, especially as the situation (hopefully) gets better as you enter your second and third years. It isn't impossible to switch from NS to ON, but you might spare yourself some future hurdles by starting out in the province you'd like to end up in.

Again, to reiterate, I'm just a 0L. I'm only some guy on the internet with incomplete knowledge of your circumstances. And all of the information I've given you is second-to-third-hand at best, and rampant speculation at worst. But I hope it's something of a stepping stone for you to eventually make your decision.

Edited by TheMidnightOil
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