Jump to content
DoWellAndGood

Is it possible for big law associates/articling students to go to the gym midday?

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Jaggers said:

You pop out for 10-15 minutes to pick up your lunch, but you actually take 45 minutes to eat it while scrolling twitter, facebook and lawbuzz.ca.

Haha this is basically my approach. I’d rather at least do some work while eating and go home early, rather than taking an hour for lunch. Unless I’m going for lunch with someone. 

Maybe Vancouverites are just weird, but I don’t really know anyone who takes a lunch break. 

Edited by Starling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/25/2020 at 7:32 PM, Jaggers said:

You pop out for 10-15 minutes to pick up your lunch, but you actually take 45 minutes to eat it while scrolling twitter, facebook and lawbuzz.ca.

I do this every single day I’m in the office. That mental break, from roughly 12-1 pm when most other people aren’t trying to get a hold of you, does wonders for being productive the rest of the day.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd recommend adjusting your schedule to workout in the mornings. Too easy to let the day get away from you as there will always be more work to do. My schedule during articling and as a junior associate was 5:45 am wake-up, pre-workout, shower, get organized 6:30 at the gym when it opened, 7:15-7:30 finish workout, 8:00-8:10 AM at the office. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TripleX said:

I'd recommend adjusting your schedule to workout in the mornings. Too easy to let the day get away from you as there will always be more work to do. My schedule during articling and as a junior associate was 5:45 am wake-up, pre-workout, shower, get organized 6:30 at the gym when it opened, 7:15-7:30 finish workout, 8:00-8:10 AM at the office. 

Why do you shower before working out? Lol

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a big fan of the morning workouts but had a similar question about why you would shower before working out... My schedule was: 6am wake-up, crush some pre-workout, leave by 6:30, workout from 7-8:15. Shower/change and get to the office just before 9. It was glorious! Now between covid and our baby getting older, I set up a garage gym and do my workouts randomly whenever I have time during the day, usually evenings during the week and early afternoon on weekends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Viszlaw said:

I'm a big fan of the morning workouts but had a similar question about why you would shower before working out... My schedule was: 6am wake-up, crush some pre-workout, leave by 6:30, workout from 7-8:15. Shower/change and get to the office just before 9. It was glorious! Now between covid and our baby getting older, I set up a garage gym and do my workouts randomly whenever I have time during the day, usually evenings during the week and early afternoon on weekends.

My dream in life is a garage/basement gym, so congrats on that! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DoWellAndGood said:

My dream in life is a garage/basement gym, so congrats on that! 

Hah why thank you! It was many, many moons in the making. I just dont see myself going back to a gym before work when things return to normal. We also just moved to a new office location, so there isn't a gym right around the corner anymore. Old office used to be at Yonge and St. Clair and there was a GoodLife two office towers over. Now I can just crank out garage workouts whenever I've got time between work and a bashful 2 year old calling the shots over here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/12/2021 at 10:42 AM, TheBanhMiBoy said:

Why do you shower before working out? Lol

Because there would not be time to do it otherwise. The gym (when it was open) opened at 6:30 AM, so there was no time to shower afterward and still make it work around 8 AM. Overall, it was not that big of a deal for me personally. If you workout when you are clean I find there's little to no impact. Other people may smell more when they sweat so it might not be an option for them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • A few things, my man: -I don't think @JusticeLordDenning was making the sort of value judgement you read in to that. Asking how students fare outside the formal recruit is not saying that the formal recruit jobs are necessarily the best jobs out there. -Both the DOJ and provincial Crown prosecution service participate in the formal recruit, so that's a poor example to illustrate your point. "Jobs in the recruit" isn't synonymous with "BigLaw." -I highly doubt that there is a huge difference in the level of interest in the formal recruit between Canadian law schools in general, and especially between Queens and Western as a specific example. And just to be clear, I'd be the last person to boost BigLaw or claim that working at a smaller firm outside the GTA is somehow inferior.
    • Some of this is might be based on what I consider to be a false assumption:  That law students who secure jobs at big firms in an urban area have succeeded while those who do not have failed. For example, a Queens student may have the career goal of securing a foot in the door with the Crown in a rural area and a Western student may want to get into business law with a small firm in a medium sized city.
    • Having those two years working with members of Parliament is an added bonus, the significance of which is proportional to the nature of your role. You should get one or two acceptances from those law schools provided you keep your grades up. You seem like the type of person who will make the right decision about this. Good luck!
    • Probablement parce qu'ils n'ont pas reçu assez d'applications? J'espère quand même qu'ont va commencer à recevoir des réponses en mars...
    • On this site I regularly see people with LSAT scores 20-30 points lower than mine making ridiculous assertions about the amount of work that is supposedly required to get a top score. By contrast my personal experience was that the prep required to get a 99th percentile LSAT score consisted of learning basic logic game diagramming and writing a handful of practice tests. I see people with scores in the 150s knowing all the names of the different types of logical reasoning questions and discussing the logic behind them in terms I never learned and don't understand. All I know is if you put the test in front of me I intuitively understand what almost all of the answers are, but I couldn't do a good job of articulating why--the answers simply seem self-evident and to be taken for granted. Just chiming in because your statement squares with my experience (although I didn't reach 177). But by and large people with mediocre scores invariably claim that the LSAT is all about effort and just don't want to believe that innate aptitude has anything to do with it, because they tend to view it as an attack on their intelligence in general. (Just so I don't seem like a totally arrogant douche, everyone: for what it's worth I've put in serious effort trying to learn instruments and second languages and my innate aptitude in both of those areas is abysmal--I found such endeavors nearly impossible. Also the innate LSAT aptitude did not translate into innate law school aptitude, and I certainly would have preferred the latter. But yeah, the fact that I suck at other things but can effortlessly get an LSAT score in the 170s just emphasizes how much of it is innate. And the degree to which there are different kinds of intelligences that people have varying aptitudes for. The LSAT is irrelevant to me now in practical terms but I do find the subject interesting from a psychological perspective.)

×
×
  • Create New...