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Clerkship Interviews 2021

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4 hours ago, Notnotadog said:

SCJ anyone?

I heard the SCJ will be coming Monday, not sure if it's all locations though.

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2 hours ago, sparklylawyer said:

I heard from the FC today. Good luck to everyone!! :) 
 

wondering if anyone can confirm 100% that FC interviews and selection goes into June though? It seems to be wishy washy in this thread. Wondering for my good friend who also applied. 

I also heard from the FC today. It seems like they are taking a more structured approach as both judges told me about a draft process similar the SCC.

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@KhalilMack I'm not aware of the SCC process. Can you explain what this draft process means? If I haven't heard anything, is it likely I won't be selected? 

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41 minutes ago, ceilidhfish said:

@KhalilMack I'm not aware of the SCC process. Can you explain what this draft process means? If I haven't heard anything, is it likely I won't be selected? 

For the FC, the judges rank their candidates and the most senior judges get to pick from the pool of candidates first and select their top choice (or the next preferred candidates if their top choices have been selected). The SCC is the same idea with a slightly different process. I wouldn't panic, all the offers may not have gone out. 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, sparklylawyer said:

I heard from the FC today. Good luck to everyone!! :) 
 

wondering if anyone can confirm 100% that FC interviews and selection goes into June though? It seems to be wishy washy in this thread. Wondering for my good friend who also applied. 

My understanding is that a number of judges offer interviews alongside the FCA/ other appellate courts and offer on the same day as the SCC concludes like other courts, however, this does not seem true for all federal court judges. It seems common that a handful of federal court judges interview into March and April (I've heard of some going as late as May).  

Edited by law1235
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14 hours ago, Notnotadog said:

I will say, transparently for those viewing this thread next year, or years into the future, that I did not receive an appellate clerkship offer this year despite great grades and, in my opinion, a good profile. A clerkship is not vital to your success and it is not indicative of the strength of your legal future legal career. I mean, I don’t know what my future career will look like, but I’m sure I will give it my all. It’s difficult to grapple with that as a candidate, but it’s true. It’ll be okay and I’m hopeful for the future. 

Full props to Notnotadog here. Going through the process makes it seem like clerking is the be-all and end-all, when really it's not. It's a very cool experience and a feather in your cap, but it is far from determinative of your career. Most of the best lawyers in Canada never clerked. Hell, most appellate judges never clerked. Even if you want to be a prof, I have had profs who are tenured and leading experts in their field in Canada who never clerked. I have also had profs who are terribly incompetent who did clerk. Plus, depending on what type of law you're doing, you will probably make more money as a first year associate anyway. So if you didn't get one, that's totally okay, you will still have a great career and the fact of even getting an interview is something to be proud of.

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Can anyone help me understand the pros and cons of 10, 11, or 12 months clerking terms? I heard something about being called to the bar a year later if you do 12 rather than 10, but I'm not entirely sure how it works. Thanks!

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, brlaw3 said:

Can anyone help me understand the pros and cons of 10, 11, or 12 months clerking terms? I heard something about being called to the bar a year later if you do 12 rather than 10, but I'm not entirely sure how it works. Thanks!

Which law society do you intend to complete your articles with? The answer will vary depending on law society. 

ETA: I see you disclosed what court you’re clerking at, so I can probably mostly answer your question without trying to be coy to preserve your anonymity.

Since you’re clerking at the BCCA, I’ll assume you’re either completing articles through the LSO or LSBC. If you’re going through another licensing body, shoot me a pm and we can discuss. 

For the LSBC, you get one month of articling credit for every two months of clerking you complete, up to a maximum of 5 months of credit. That means you’ll have to complete five additional months of articling at a firm. Most firms have their clerks join in September, so the difference is really whether you’d like to have time off during the summer. If you already have a firm lined up, it never hurts to ask if they have any preference, but my understanding is that firms are usually quite flexible with their returning clerks. 

The LSO process is a bit more complicated. Clerking for ten months satisfies your articling requirement. In normal times, there’s a call ceremony in June in most major cities. The September start date means you can’t hit ten months before you’d be called to the bar, and the BCCA won’t let you clerk once you’ve been called. If you go with the ten month clerkship, you can usually apply to abridge your articles with the LSO and leave your clerkship a couple of weeks early. That lets you get called in June with the rest of your articling class. If you go with the 11 or 12 month term, that’s not possible. That means you’ll have to wait until September to be called. If you’re going back to a firm in Ontario post-clerkship and your starting date is before your call to the bar, you’ll have to organize a supervision agreement with the firm in the interim. 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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28 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

If you go with the 11 or 12 month term, that’s not possible. That means you’ll have to wait until September to be called. If you’re going back to a firm in Ontario post-clerkship and your starting date is before your call to the bar, you’ll have to organize a supervision agreement with the firm in the interim. 

That's interesting, and clearly a change from when I did my clerkship. I, and most of my fellow clerks who were being called in ON, did the June call date, and continued working as clerks after that through the summer. Any idea when, and why, that changed?

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1 minute ago, erinl2 said:

That's interesting, and clearly a change from when I did my clerkship. I, and most of my fellow clerks who were being called in ON, did the June call date, and continued working as clerks after that through the summer. Any idea when, and why, that changed?

I believe it’s a BCCA specific thing. Of the appellate courts I applied to, the BCCA is the only one that doesn’t let you clerk after you’ve been called. 

My understanding is that the FCA, ONCA and SCC allow you to be called while clerking (and ONCA gives you the pay bump that comes with it). I’m not sure when it changed, but it’s been that way since I first applied for clerkships in 2019! 

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34 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

I believe it’s a BCCA specific thing. Of the appellate courts I applied to, the BCCA is the only one that doesn’t let you clerk after you’ve been called. 

My understanding is that the FCA, ONCA and SCC allow you to be called while clerking (and ONCA gives you the pay bump that comes with it). I’m not sure when it changed, but it’s been that way since I first applied for clerkships in 2019! 

Can you comment on whether the SCJ or FC allow you to clerk while being called? I imagine it would be similar to the FCA and ONCA but law school has taught me to expect nothing. Thank you!

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12 minutes ago, KhalilMack said:

Can you comment on whether the SCJ or FC allow you to clerk while being called? I imagine it would be similar to the FCA and ONCA but law school has taught me to expect nothing. Thank you!

I am fairly certain the FC allows you to be called. I’m not sure about the SCJ, but I suspect they either end their clerkships before the call date or they let you clerk while called.

With that said, since both have set clerkship lengths it doesn’t really matter. I would never encourage someone to pass up a clerkship just because it will push their call date by a few months. The BCCA one only matters because you have the choice between getting called with your peers in June or working for two extra months at a very interesting job and getting called in September! 

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2 hours ago, KhalilMack said:

Can you comment on whether the SCJ or FC allow you to clerk while being called? I imagine it would be similar to the FCA and ONCA but law school has taught me to expect nothing. Thank you!

I can confirm that you do continue clerking at SCJ after being called to the bar! Typically SCJ clerks get called to the bar in June and continue as counsel until the next group of clerks start in August - with a pay raise after being called. 

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1 minute ago, WindsorHopeful said:

I can confirm that you do continue clerking at SCJ after being called to the bar! Typically SCJ clerks get called to the bar in June and continue as counsel until the next group of clerks start in August - with a pay raise after being called. 

Thank you for that answer! 

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5 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Which law society do you intend to complete your articles with? The answer will vary depending on law society. 

ETA: I see you disclosed what court you’re clerking at, so I can probably mostly answer your question without trying to be coy to preserve your anonymity.

Since you’re clerking at the BCCA, I’ll assume you’re either completing articles through the LSO or LSBC. If you’re going through another licensing body, shoot me a pm and we can discuss. 

For the LSBC, you get one month of articling credit for every two months of clerking you complete, up to a maximum of 5 months of credit. That means you’ll have to complete five additional months of articling at a firm. Most firms have their clerks join in September, so the difference is really whether you’d like to have time off during the summer. If you already have a firm lined up, it never hurts to ask if they have any preference, but my understanding is that firms are usually quite flexible with their returning clerks. 

The LSO process is a bit more complicated. Clerking for ten months satisfies your articling requirement. In normal times, there’s a call ceremony in June in most major cities. The September start date means you can’t hit ten months before you’d be called to the bar, and the BCCA won’t let you clerk once you’ve been called. If you go with the ten month clerkship, you can usually apply to abridge your articles with the LSO and leave your clerkship a couple of weeks early. That lets you get called in June with the rest of your articling class. If you go with the 11 or 12 month term, that’s not possible. That means you’ll have to wait until September to be called. If you’re going back to a firm in Ontario post-clerkship and your starting date is before your call to the bar, you’ll have to organize a supervision agreement with the firm in the interim. 

Thank you very much!!

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For those asking about the FC clerkship, i still have an interview on Monday so it really is not over. 

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1 hour ago, SCOTUS said:

What happens if we miss the call on Monday?

I assume you just call back. People have obligations. Just do it within a reasonable period of time.

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13 minutes ago, Notnotadog said:

I assume you just call back. People have obligations. Just do it within a reasonable period of time.

And they would probably leave you a message (assuming young people still use voicemail?).

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I have a friend wondering about the likelihood of 2nd round offers at ONCA or the FCA? Anyone have experience with this? As in, how unheard of is it for students to receive an offer from an appellate court after they've offered first offers? 

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