Jump to content
lawwal

How bad do you have to do to fail an exam?

Recommended Posts

The only time I ever heard of someone failing a course was that they (inexplicably) read a tort hypo and though it was a trick question and simply wrote "there is no liability." 

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Prospero said:

The only time I ever heard of someone failing a course was that they (inexplicably) read a tort hypo and though it was a trick question and simply wrote "there is no liability." 

"there is no liability" this statement inspired me to turn my life around from drugs and alcohol and start a family. it has so much meaning. I have this quoted in a picture frame on my nightstand. every night I look at it and realize how much faith and hope "there is no liability" has given me. there is no liability. there will never be liability. 

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Prospero said:

"there is no liability."

Client: aren't you going to atleast do further research or canvass the law to determine my optio-

This guy as a lawyer: Did I stutter 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Prospero said:

The only time I ever heard of someone failing a course was that they (inexplicably) read a tort hypo and though it was a trick question and simply wrote "there is no liability." 

*Face-palm*

What gets me isn't that perhaps their conclusion was entirely wrong, it's that they didn't expand on their answer.

Excellent point first writing though.

Edited by Twenty
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 2L, I was writing an International Law exam and it was tough. Halfway through the third major question, I realized I had fudged the first question by misidentifying the issue (surely, the professor wouldn't ask TWO questions about state jurisdiction, right?). My confidence evaporated and my mind started to race. Would I have to rewrite? How fucked was I for 2L jobs and articling?

As my mind started to fall apart I took my ear plugs out and sat there, staring forward, listening to the rapid chattering of thousand of keystrokes. I let myself do this for five minutes while I regained perspective and marched forward to salvage what I could. 

I still came out with C+, and I was thrilled with that grade, given the circumstances.

The moral here is that exams can, at times, feel like a crap shoot and it can be hard to predict where you'll end up. However, this assumption can never take priority over diligent study. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since a bunch of people are sharing stories of failure to (hopefully) encourage and cheer up others, I'll chip in:

In one class, my professor was very stringent about us having only very brief CANs with very limited page counts we had to strictly adhere to. Like many others, I used ridiculously small font and put my information into narrow columns. Combined with this, we were allocated less time for that exam than most.

While trying to frantically churn something out within the allotted time, I glossed over the word "not" that was squeezed into one of my narrow columns in small font and separated from the rest of the sentence in the relevant test by a line. In the chaos of the speeded exam my brain processed the test without the "not" and I went on to conduct my analysis with the exact opposite test criteria and correspondingly the exact opposite analysis and outcome than I should have. By far the dumbest mistake I ever made in law school.

I should have, and in fact, did, know better, because as soon as I left the exam room, I got out of exam panic mode and my head cleared, and I recalled what the actual test was. I immediately knew I messed up and I thought I was completely screwed.

I somehow ended up getting a B- even though I fully admit I should have failed. I think it would be hard to do worse than I did on an open book exam.

Fortunately I can now already move on and laugh about this experience. Still got interviews and articles shortly afterwards with that on my transcript, too.

Edited by CleanHands

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, CleanHands said:

In one class, my professor was very stringent about us having only very brief CANs with very limited page counts we had to strictly adhere to. Like many others, I used ridiculously small font and put my information into narrow columns. 

This is not the right strategy when faced with this kind of restriction. The right strategy is to think about what is really important, and put it in there in your normal font.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Jaggers said:

This is not the right strategy when faced with this kind of restriction. The right strategy is to think about what is really important, and put it in there in your normal font.

A bit late for that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is difficult to do much worse or better than average if you are a reasonably diligent law student. But it is possible, two prominent examples from my 1L cohort failed 1L. One literally only partied and never went to class (he repeated and is now a lawyer) and the other was a mature student who simply wasn't able to process the material.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the contracts profs at my school said one of the few people he failed did nothing but rewrite the fact pattern in the 1L December contracts exam.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/17/2020 at 11:02 AM, chaboywb said:

Addendum - Flash forward to now. 3L. Have articling lined up. Written over a dozen finals. You'd think, by now, I'd realize that the curve saves all and it's near impossible to fail. Yet I'm still stressing about a shitty final I wrote a couple days ago. 

I'm coming to realize one of the social aspects that I am missing out on because of all of the exams being online is being able to ascertain what the class average will be like (and therefore whether the entire class will be saved by the curve) based on how horrified my classmates look after everyone has submitted their exams.

  • Like 4
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Toad said:

I'm coming to realize one of the social aspects that I am missing out on because of all of the exams being online is being able to ascertain what the class average will be like (and therefore whether the entire class will be saved by the curve) based on how horrified my classmates look after everyone has submitted their exams.

This, so much this 😂 I wish to console and be consoled via expressions of abject horror and whispered wtf was that's!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Mal said:

the other was a mature student who simply wasn't able to process the material.

Well, that's discouraging. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, GreyDude said:

Well, that's discouraging. :unsure:

Probably due to individual reasons. There are mature students at my school who do exceedingly well.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, GreyDude said:

Well, that's discouraging. :unsure:

Don't be discouraged! A friend of mine went to one of the "harder to get into" schools in their late 30's and was valedictorian, and hired at a very competitive firm. It's all about the individual, and most people will not achieve this at any age, and it's not the only measure of "success", but having that person show me that age isn't a factor that prevents great success in LS has always been helpful to me so thought I would share with you. 

Edited by legallybrunette3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Psychometronic said:

Probably due to individual reasons. There are mature students at my school who do exceedingly well.

Yeah my experience has been that mature students often do very well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, legallybrunette3 said:

Don't be discouraged! A friend of mine went to one of the "harder to get into" schools in their late 30's and was valedictorian, and hired at a very competitive firm. It's all about the individual, and most people will not achieve this at any age, and it's not the only measure of "success", but having that person show me that age isn't a factor that prevents great success in LS has always been helpful to me so thought I would share with you. 

Thanks for that! 

I actually feel pretty confident in my ability to succeed at law school. It's getting in, in the first place, that I'm more worried about. ;-)  That said, I have had to consider what it will be like to adjust to being a student full-time again after all these years, if I'm offered the chance to find out. And I'm looking forward to it.

Edited by GreyDude
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/19/2020 at 7:40 PM, CleanHands said:

While trying to frantically churn something out within the allotted time, I glossed over the word "not" that was squeezed into one of my narrow columns in small font and separated from the rest of the sentence in the relevant test by a line. In the chaos of the speeded exam my brain processed the test without the "not" and I went on to conduct my analysis with the exact opposite test criteria and correspondingly the exact opposite analysis and outcome than I should have.

I've heard this happen to others as well, so you're not alone. This is why whenever a test includes "not", I always put it in caps, underlined, red, and in a slightly larger font. Might be overkill, but I haven't missed one luckily!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/20/2020 at 1:54 PM, GreyDude said:

Thanks for that! 

I actually feel pretty confident in my ability to succeed at law school. It's getting in, in the first place, that I'm more worried about. ;-)  That said, I have had to consider what it will be like to adjust to being a student full-time again after all these years, if I'm offered the chance to find out. And I'm looking forward to it.

I’ll parrot the others and say that the mature students in my 1L class seem totally on the ball. We haven’t sat down and compared grades or anything, but they often insightfully chime into discussions and offer meaningful comments. I wouldn’t worry at all. If anything, I reckon a background that’s more diverse than high school -> undergrad -> JD (such as my own) would prove to carry unique value in its own right. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the day......mid term.....1st year.     A two question exam, worth 50% each.  I spent 90 plus % of the time on the first question, wrote page after page after page (inexperience).   I looked at the second question and saw I had like 10 minutes or so.   I freaked for about a minute then realized.....I gotta deal with this.

I drew a flow chart.   If this, then that, kind of thing.  12 or so boxes and arrows, half a page, tops...... 8 - 9 minutes. 

Got a D on my 10 pages of prose on the first question.  Got an A on my flow chart.  I think that came out as a B- for the whole exam.  

That's when I realized......nobody fails law school.

  • Like 6
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I'm starting this topic for students who have been admitted to the GPLLM programme. Hope to get to know some of you before the start of the semester! 
    • I've got similar stats but have zero clue either, but good luck, I'm rooting for you! Will follow thread in case anyone can help chance us 
    • You could totally see it as a crappy way to find out that your chances might not be in your favour. I'm more of the foolish optimist that would take it as a helpful early sign for you to realign your hopes for the U of A. I totally agree that you should check the previously admitted scores and see where you are and gauge accordingly. Waiting anxiously is really exhausting, especially when you don't know when you're going to hear back. Good on you for applying broadly, so many universities are sending out their offers later in the year. It's literally out of your hands and because we can't control it, it can bring on this helpless feeling. I went through a rejection year and while I was worried waiting, I went ahead and slowly planned for each outcome. I was graduating during COVID so I remade my resume, took a public speaking course, made a list of all the shows I was going to binge, reflected whether my current volunteer and work was relevant in law, etc. Then I got rejected, shamelessly gave myself time to ball my eyes out and then started on with my plan. It really helped knowing there was something I was ready to do right after being rejected. Really put me in perspective and when I applied this year, you bet I did the same thing. Not saying that this will happen, of course, I hope you kick ass under the holistic section! Just thought it might be worth to share as it definitely helped me be more calm during these uneasy times.      
    • My friend just wrote her LSAT in January and received an offer second week of February so they're definitely still accepting
    • Accepted this morning via email to the Dual JD program! cGPA: 3.65 LSAT: 157 (Jan) 2 BAs, did a summer abroad, lots of ECs with minority groups, community development, some social work-related employment experience  As a note to some of you lurkers anxiously checking these pages every morning (AKA me) please don't worry! Those emails you're waiting for will show up in your inbox one way or another, so take a deep breath, drink some water, have a snack even. You got this. 

×
×
  • Create New...