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hopefullawstudent123

Suggestions for backup plans???

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After attending the LSAC Forum today and hearing schools like Osgoode and Ottawa confirm that this cycle will definitely be highly competitive, I am now frantically looking into backup options. I was maybe a bit overconfident going into this cycle and only applied to a handful of schools (UBC, Osgoode, U of T, Western, Queen's, and Ottawa) (for reference, I have a 165 3.78 OLSAS cumulative GPA). I am now worried that there is a very real chance it might not work out for me this year. This was not something I even thought about when applying due to previous medians and cycles, so I am only now looking into other options. I am primarily thinking of applying to Master's programs and maybe even some American law schools (the LSAC GPA conversion is surprisingly generous). Has anyone else considered this and what type of options would you recommend for a year between undergrad and law school if need be? How would it look to reapply having just worked for a year? Any advice would be very much appreciated:)

 

Edited by hopefullawstudent123

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With those stats I would be surprised if you didn't get into at least Western/Queen's/Ottawa.

You can still apply to UVic, TRU, USask, Dalhousie, and UNB for this cycle if you're really worried. You'd be a shoe-in at TRU.

To your actual question, nobody can tell you what your backup should be. Whether you should work, do a masters, or whatever is up to you to decide. The only "wrong" decision is to do absolutely nothing for a year.

I wouldn't even consider American schools with those stats if you intend on practicing in Canada.

Edited by canuckfanatic
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Okay, hopefullawstudent123. I want you to calm your mammaries, or whatever is on your chest. Breathe in, breathe out. Okay? Okay. 

Here is the deal: it's December, and the very first wave of offers has recently been going out. This probably makes you antsy, it makes me antsy, it makes everyone antsy. But the fact that you didn't get an offer from anywhere right away does not mean it's time to panic. I'm in the same situation of having no offers yet, but my stats are lower than yours. We - you - have months ahead of us in terms of admissions. And even if you don't get in anywhere, you can apply next year. There is no need to look into a Master's program or an American school if you didn't already want those things. Law school is not going anywhere and neither are you. There's nothing wrong with working for a year in between.

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42 minutes ago, hopefullawstudent123 said:

After attending the LSAC Forum today and hearing schools like Osgoode and Ottawa confirm that this cycle will definitely be highly competitive, I am now frantically looking into backup options. I was maybe a bit overconfident going into this cycle and only applied to a handful of schools (UBC, Osgoode, U of T, Western, Queen's, and Ottawa) (for reference, I have a 165 3.78 OLSAS cumulative GPA). I am now worried that there is a very real chance it might not work out for me this year. This was not something I even thought about when applying due to previous medians and cycles, so I am only now looking into other options. I am primarily thinking of applying to Master's programs and maybe even some American law schools (the LSAC GPA conversion is surprisingly generous). Has anyone else considered this and what type of options would you recommend for a year between undergrad and law school if need be? How would it look to reapply having just worked for a year? Any advice would be very much appreciated:)

 

I am 100% sure you will get in to Ottawa and most likely for OZ, Queens and Western...

U of T is possible too.

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Echoing the above; take a chill pill, OP. There is no way you are going to get rejected from all of the schools you applied to with those stats.

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28 minutes ago, canuckfanatic said:

With those stats I would be surprised if you didn't get into at least Western/Queen's/Ottawa.

You can still apply to UVic, TRU, USask, Dalhousie, and UNB for this cycle if you're really worried. You'd be a shoe-in at TRU.

To your actual question, nobody can tell you what your backup should be. Whether you should work, do a masters, or whatever is up to you to decide. The only "wrong" decision is to do absolutely nothing for a year.

I wouldn't even consider American schools with those stats if you intend on practicing in Canada.

 

22 minutes ago, Liavas said:

Okay, hopefullawstudent123. I want you to calm your mammaries, or whatever is on your chest. Breathe in, breathe out. Okay? Okay. 

Here is the deal: it's December, and the very first wave of offers has recently been going out. This probably makes you antsy, it makes me antsy, it makes everyone antsy. But the fact that you didn't get an offer from anywhere right away does not mean it's time to panic. I'm in the same situation of having no offers yet, but my stats are lower than yours. We - you - have months ahead of us in terms of admissions. And even if you don't get in anywhere, you can apply next year. There is no need to look into a Master's program or an American school if you didn't already want those things. Law school is not going anywhere and neither are you. There's nothing wrong with working for a year in between.

 

4 minutes ago, CleanHands said:

Echoing the above; take a chill pill, OP. There is no way you are going to get rejected from all of the schools you applied to with those stats.

 

 

10 minutes ago, Luckycharm said:

I am 100% sure you will get in to Ottawa and most likely for OZ, Queens and Western...

U of T is possible too.

Thank you all - I appreciate your honest responses. I do realize it is December and I did not mean for this post to come off as too irrational (however, I see why it did come off this way). I am just trying to be proactive while I have some time during the break and was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for other potential options that I might not have considered. I appreciate the reassurance, though.

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You will get into law school. I would say everything but UofT is almost certain; UofT you have 50% chance

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What if OP had lower grades - Any difference in advice for those of us who aren't as competitive and are also stressed af? 

 

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I have the same LSAT and a lower cgpa and am already in at Ottawa and UNB, you are a shoe in, I'm 100% sure you'll get in somewhere soon!

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Seeing this is definitely stressful lol, I have a 3.73 (OLSAS) and a 161 with no plans to retake. I've applied to Ottawa, Queens, Oz, McGill, and Windsor. Should I apply to UNB and Dal?

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8 minutes ago, habsfan99 said:

Seeing this is definitely stressful lol, I have a 3.73 (OLSAS) and a 161 with no plans to retake. I've applied to Ottawa, Queens, Oz, McGill, and Windsor. Should I apply to UNB and Dal?

I am so sorry that this post stressed you out - that was absolutely not the intention. I probably am being incredibly irrational. However, as you can tell, I am very risk-averse, so my two cents would be if you would genuinely consider going to UNB and Dal and the application fee is not too much of a burden for you I would apply! Best case scenario you get in everywhere/multiple schools and get to make a decision.

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30 minutes ago, habsfan99 said:

Should I apply to UNB and Dal?

Not if you want to work in Ontario. 

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Reading this with my 3.74 GPA and 159 LSAT was stressful lol. Looking at last years acceptance threads I would think these stats were competitive for schools like Ottawa but who knows

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Oof, I really hope the medians do not shift too much if the cycle is truly more competitive. I have a 3.71 OLSAS CGPA and 164 LSAT and was really hoping for Osgoode as I am over both of last years averages. Who knows at this point though. 

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8 minutes ago, blech77 said:

Oof, I really hope the medians do not shift too much if the cycle is truly more competitive. I have a 3.71 OLSAS CGPA and 164 LSAT and was really hoping for Osgoode as I am over both of last years averages. Who knows at this point though. 

Osgoode is very holistic though from what I understand, so unlike other schools being over the median isn’t as much of a guarantee of admission.

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4 hours ago, hopefullawstudent123 said:

 

After attending the LSAC Forum today and hearing schools like Osgoode and Ottawa confirm that this cycle will definitely be highly competitive,

 

May I ask where you heard this confirmed? 

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1 hour ago, legallybrunette3 said:

May I ask where you heard this confirmed? 

Someone asked Osgoode at the LSAC forum today. Someone also posted an email response from Osgoode confirming this in another thread (I believe the “more 170 scores etc” thread) if you wanted to read what their response was. With the increase in applicants a more competitive cycle was definitely inevitable, though :( 

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Definitely a bit early, but I actually would encourage anyone to have a few options available just in case. You'll probably get into law school, but you may not get into your first choice (no clue - just hypothetically speaking)! If you can afford to apply to maybe 1 or 2 MA programs, that might help with your concern because you won't be scrambling to figure something out come summertime...

As a personal anecdote, I had a 96% average in undergrad (no clue what the OLSAS conversion is). I applied to 3 MA programs and 1 law school. Got rejected from 2 MA programs, accepted to 1 MA and my law school. Going in, I thought I'd get in everywhere because of my grades, ECs, and LORs (no LSAT). It goes to show that you should never say never. Admissions can be nebulous, so I would encourage you to branch out and have a Plan B regardless of your stats. 

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