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Anyone works part-time?

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5 hours ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

If you have one day off per week but you are available to clients and checking emails, do you really have one day off?

No. 

They're working 60% or 80% of the hours they'd normally work, as reflected in their billings. 

Is that the same as a full-time position?  

No.

 

 

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Ruthenium said:

They're working 60% or 80% of the hours they'd normally work, as reflected in their billings. 

Is that the same as a full-time position?  

No.

 

It depends on the office. In many firms 80% of what most lawyers are doing is still very much a full time job 

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8 hours ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

It depends on the office. In many firms 80% of what most lawyers are doing is still very much a full time job 

Exactly. And 80% is not what I'd consider a part-time job. Most who are interested in part-time really want half-time, and that isn't going to result in only working half the hours/effort/involvement that one might expect. Many, many, even most, employers are not going to make this a possibility.

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Ok.  

OP, I know of a few instances of associates and senior associates at firms working 60% or 80% the time as someone at regular rate, mostly at boutiques or small/medium firms.  Their schedule, for instance, is 9-6/6:30 on workdays and then overtime hours here and there on urgent matters as they arise, usually with some flex on workdays versus days off to accommodate clients or hearing dates.  I'm not certain but I believe they took a pay hit on base pay to make it work.  It isn't the typical part-time job, but it also pays substantially more than the typical part-time job.  

On a more general note, law's a big profession.  It isn't all big firms and the massive, around-the-clock clients associated with those firms.  If you have a private practice area in mind, try looking at firms and reaching out to associates or soles etc.  In most cases, part-time status isn't listed on a firm site or similar, but knowing your practice area and the culture of the various firms in it will help you locate workplaces that are more amenable to a reduced hours structure. 

If you want a rigid half time and then turn off completely, that doesn't square with most of the legal profession, including most (but not all) of the examples with which I'm familiar.  But if you're looking for part-time as reduced hours, there are headwinds (see above), but it's out there.  

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At my firm the part-timers all work 60% or 80% schedules. We are all women, and all have more than one child. The hours tend to be reasonable in general, and the reduced schedule is better reflected in file load than in days off. I'm pretty sure that the 60%ers are also checking email on their days off. If you were super organized you could probably avoid it and ask someone else to cover for you on your off day, but you can't just disappear for a day. Ever. Same with holidays -- you can take them, but someone has to cover for you while you're gone. I have a single institutional client in a 24/7 industry that frequently needs to appear in court on extremely short notice. 

It sounds kind of awful when I write it out, but it's actually awesome. It's never an issue finding someone to cover you for holidays, or long trials, or whatever. 

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I guess I should mention that if you want more freedom/reduced hours you could consider sole practice. I work full-time but I often don't roll in until 10am and sometimes I leave at 3 or 4 if I don't feel like working or want to be home for when the schoolbus arrives. I also do some consulting work on the side and have been considering doing an LLM for fun/possibly to get into publishing something one day (Mountebank on Remedies anyone? Pre-order now!). It's not a bad gig if you want more flexibility/freedom.

Then again, sometimes shit goes down and I'm working til midnight but meh nothing is perfect.

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I work 8:30-5 with an hour for lunch in there. For most lawyers that's already part-time, imo. Am in government. I've also known some lawyers to drop to an 80% work week for a time, so they would work even fewer hours (at 80% pay). 

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3 minutes ago, sarstan said:

I work 8:30-5 with an hour for lunch in there. For most lawyers that's already part-time, imo. Am in government. I've also known some lawyers to drop to an 80% work week for a time, so they would work even fewer hours (at 80% pay). 

I think this was supposed to be a thread about options for working PART TIME. Not for working a standard 40 hour work week. That’s just a full time job in the public sector. It’s totally irrelevant. 

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5 minutes ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

I think this was supposed to be a thread about options for working PART TIME. Not for working a standard 40 hour work week. That’s just a full time job in the public sector. It’s totally irrelevant. 

Jesus H Christ, relax. 

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On 12/11/2020 at 4:29 PM, epeeist said:

OP sounds like they're working part-time as a lawyer employed by a law firm, which is quite different from me;   have a normal non-lawyer job, and also (with their knowledge and written into my agreement) I'm free to practice law on my own as a sole practitioner, which I do part-time, from recommendations and having total control over intake, typically only a few active files.

could i ask what your job is now?

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