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katem156

Chance me (be honest, im so nervous; 3.6, 3.8, 155)

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CGPA: 3.6 Best 2: 3.8 LSAT: 155 - I'm retaking the LSAT - but i don't know how much better I can do :( 

I'm applying with a strong PC and my references are good, I have 3+ years of experience in immigration law, published research in a human rights journal, involved in moot court team - but im so worried about my LSAT.

I applied to: Western, Windsor, Queens, McGill, Uottawa and Dal - Queens is my top choice 

 

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@luckycharm

does a private tutor really make that big of a difference? I was going to buckle down and grind during Christmas break

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27 minutes ago, katem156 said:

@luckycharm

does a private tutor really make that big of a difference? I was going to buckle down and grind during Christmas break

I think you should be careful with private tutors. Many people on this site told me to hire one and I listened without hesitation lol, but it did absolutely nothing for me and it ended up being the biggest waste of money ever. Most of the good tutors are about $100/hr...and I found that I'd only get through maybe 3-4 questions in that amount of time. It was really a waste:( For some people its great, but not everyone. So just make sure you really consider how you learn and whether a tutor fits your studying habits/needs. 

Edited by culitigator
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@culitigator Thank you!! I actually noticed that there were multiple comments by the same couple people about private tutors which seemed a little sus

 

Im sorry about your wasted money :(

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The way to study for the LSAT is definitely different for everyone depending on learning style! Personally, 7sage really helped me, their methods on blind review specifically helped me pinpoint where I was going wrong and my score ended up going up quite a bit after using it! 

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Have you taken a prep course before? Do you know which section you struggle with the most?

I would suggest to first find your weakness and then decide if you need a private tutor or not. For example, if you're struggling with RC, a private tutor isn't much help but reading outside of the LSAT will go a long way. (How I improved on RC)

If you're having trouble with LG, Try 7sage. Their online course provides a good curriculum for LG.

If LR is what you're having trouble with, try The Loophole book by Ellen Cassidy.  

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First and foremost: welcome to the forums!

I will let more capable members speculate on your chances, but in terms of improving your LSAT you might want to consult a thread where I listed a number of resources for self-study as well as guided instruction. 

Like others have suggested, optimal study methods for the LSAT vary a great deal by test taker. There is no one size fits all. Hell, I would say there isn't even a one size fits most! Consequently, if you find things aren't clicking with one approach it may be worthwhile exploring other methods. That's the primary reason I made the above referenced thread: to provide a wide variety of perspectives in the hopes that one will resonate.

I am an LSAT instructor and similar to @culitigator I find that the tutoring hour is too short to spend time on specific questions*. Tutoring can be valuable (depending on the student) but in most cases, the time is best spent reviewing overarching themes as opposed to individual questions. I have found students generally benefit a greater amount when they have already reviewed material in some detail and have a decent idea of what types of questions give them trouble and why. If you can't identify those specifics, a tutoring hour may not be such a great use of time and money and a course may be the better option.

*unless you are in the upper echelon of test takers and are trying to suss out subtle nuance

 

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Honestly a tutor wasn’t worth it for me either.

The concepts on the LSAT are not that difficult to grasp. In other words, you should be able to comprehend them yourself if you take the time to do so. 
 

7sage is perfect for this. They give you explanations for every question basically, and you can sit there and work though them until it clicks. Do the practice drills until it clicks. Repeat the question until it clicks. 

I felt so under pressure to grasp things instantly with a tutor because I was paying them $100 an hour: this simply wasn’t conducive to a healthy learning environment for me. 

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A lot of tutors will give you a free trial or reduced rate trial. There are some that are under $100 that are pretty good but yeah it depends on the person. I think the majority of my gains came because I had a good study buddy and we covered for each other's weaknesses -- she was better at some question types, I was better at others. And we met consistently online twice a week, sometimes going over questions for hours at a time. 

Other than that 7sage, seeing my problem areas and doing problem sets was effective. Would definitely try to redo that LSAT! 

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14 hours ago, katem156 said:

@luckycharm

does a private tutor really make that big of a difference? I was going to buckle down and grind during Christmas break

It is your choice

 

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