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What are the most diverse law schools?

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17 minutes ago, Dreamchaser said:

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but looking at class profiles, it seems like every law school has "brown" students entering every year so you will find them wherever you go however, is it because you want a diverse population or attend a school with "desi" students. Schools can be diverse and still not have brown students. Either way, I don't think it should be a deciding factor. You will meet all sorts of people in the legal industry and working/studying with them in law school will prepare you for those interactions that you would miss out on if you're confined to a circle of your own people. :) 

Honestly, its not just schools, but a city that is super diverse where i want to practice.

Diversity is extremely important to me as a person of color (if you're white- obviously you wont understand why I value diversity or not), but I do understand what you mean by not confining myself

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4 minutes ago, msk2012 said:

If I had to guess, I'd say U of T, Osgoode, Ryerson, and UBC. There is sometimes a preference to study closer to home in the Desi community (or at least on the part of Desi parents) so I'd imagine that the schools in larger urban centers might have larger Desi populations. I haven't included McGill or other Montreal schools as English-French bilingualism is less common in the Desi community outside of Quebec and there aren't many Desis in Quebec.

Having said that, the schools that I've mentioned don't just serve the local populations and are amongst the most selective in the country. You'll find Desi people pretty much everywhere.

haha I was actually guessing those schools as well given how diverse Toronto and Vancouver are.

Happen to know about uofc or uofa, i know alberta has a diverse population as well

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5 minutes ago, DeepThree02 said:

Honestly, its not just schools, but a city that is super diverse where i want to practice.

Diversity is extremely important to me as a person of color (if you're white- obviously you wont understand why I value diversity or not), but I do understand what you mean by not confining myself

I'm brown as well and also an immigrant so I understand the importance of diversity and its value in shaping you as a person. But from my personal experience, I wish I engaged more with people of other backgrounds to understand the differences. This is why I mentioned to not confine yourself because then you'll realize how much you missed out on because you weren't willing to go out of your comfort zone. I know you didn't state that you only want to interact with brown population but diversity isn't limited to desi people. 

But regardless, as someone mentioned earlier, given Canada's multicultural community, you'll find people of your own color/race at every law school. 

Edited by Dreamchaser
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5 minutes ago, GoblinKing said:

Still, it's certainly valuable to interact with lots of people of varying races and ethnic backgrounds rather than seeking refuge amongst your own culture. Forgive me if I mistook the tone of the latter part of your post. 

Haha, I totally agree with you, which is why diversity is so important- hearing from people of various different cultures. I said bonus points with brown/desi people, as I feel super comfortable with them, but diversity regardless (not just brown, but asian, black, latino, etc...) i fabulous.

I was just stressing the importance of a school with a large person of color population

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Just now, Dreamchaser said:

I'm brown as well and also an immigrant so I understand the importance of diversity and its value in shaping you as a person. But from my personal experience, I wish I engaged more with people of other backgrounds to understand the differences. This is why I mentioned to not confine yourself because then you'll realize how much you missed out because you weren't willing to go out of your comfort zone. I know you didn't state that you only want to interact with brown population but diversity isn't limited to desi people. 

But regardless, as someone mentioned earlier, given Canada's multicultural community, you'll find people of your own color/race at every law school. 

Oh yes, totally right interacting with people of all kind is super important.

I was just stressing the important of a school where im not the only person of color, and a sizeable desi population would be the icing on the cake :)

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31 minutes ago, Diplock said:

I'm not here to argue with your priorities. But if you carry this into legal practice after law school, you're going to severely limit your options. Just saying.

Good luck.

Many people have this concern going into practice. I made sure to find a queer friendly firm. Many lawyers do this/seek this. 

I feel you should probably go do your EDI hours, and speak to the criminal defence lawyers of colour near you about their experiences.

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21 minutes ago, undertheletter said:

Everyone keeps saying it's 2020 as if that is a sufficient and unquestionable qualification on their opinion. As a POC myself, I don't share the same sentiment as OP and couldn't care less if everyone around me was white. I think you're entitled to your opinion and have the right to go and inquire about diversity, but I don't think you ought to assume that all POC feel the same way, or that your sentiments should be self-evident to everyone else (white or non-white).  

In any event, class profiles with diversity stats are available on pretty much every school site. 

 

 

My personal comment on it being 2020 is that at this point even non-minorities, who were maybe sheltered in the past, have been exposed to a lot of information on the importance of representation to many people. So I didn't understand the confusion surrounding OP's wish to attend a school with other brown students. In no way do I mean that all POC, all members of a minority group, etc., prioritize (racial or other) diversity/representation at their school or in their larger communities. Would never assume that two people of the same race, religion, sex, etc. hold the same views. 

Edited by LawBlaw2019

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2 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

Oh my.. Is law school like prison where you gang up by race? 

As a mixed person, I'd have so many options. When the race war arrives, the mixed will adapt. 

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2 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

Oh my.. Is law school like prison where you gang up by race? 

Not at all, but I highly value diversity (as a brown person), and would not want to be in a school where im the only POC

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2 minutes ago, LawBlaw2019 said:

My personal comment on it being 2020 is that at this point even non-minorities, who were maybe sheltered in the past, have been exposed to a lot of information on the importance of representation to many people. So I didn't understand the confusion surrounding OP's wish to attend a school with other brown students. In no way do I mean that all POC, all members of a minority group, etc., prioritize diversity/representation at their school or in their larger communities. Would never assume that two people of the same race, religion, sex, etc. hold the same views. 

Yeah we hold completely different views, which is totally fine.

 

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Just now, GoblinKing said:

As a mixed person, I'd have so many options. When the race war arrives, the mixed will adapt. 

I’m a brown but not desi so idk if I’d be an adequate shade for OP’s table

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Worry about the diversity of a city, not the diversity of a law school. Law schools are already relatively diverse. 

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25 minutes ago, DeepThree02 said:

I'm not sure why you think this would severely limit my options. Going to a school with a sizeable person of color/minority population, as well living in a city with these factors are extremely important to me. 

Well, quite simply, there are a lot of professional environments out there where you may not find a lot of diversity, and certainly not a lot of South Asians. And it may not have anything to do with less than positive values or culture. It may be a community where there simply isn't a lot of diversity. It may be a firm that doesn't happen to have a lot of it traditionally, along the vectors you're looking for. Imagine a firm, for example, that was mainly Jewish for a couple of generations in the past. You can't really argue with their tendency to work within their own cultural group right - you've just endorsed that this makes sense to you. So maybe now they're looking to expand outwards, but you're one of the first.

Most particularly - this is an issue that's on my radar but not on many students', because they imagine large large firms - you need to remember that many, many legal jobs occur in smaller office environments. It's part of the reality that "small business" collectively accounts for a huge slice of the workforce. In a small office, there may simply not be a lot of diversity due to the rule of small numbers.

So, my point is simply this. At the start of your legal career, you probably don't know much about where you might end up or even want to end up in terms of practice area. Maybe you want a government job, or to work as a Crown. The Crown's office as a whole is often very diverse. But not if you need to take your first job in Timmins in order to get in there.

Anyway, I didn't intend to write at such length, but I appreciate this discussion is already going semi-sideways. I don't want to be an entitled white guy on this topic, failing to understand how and why someone from a racialized background would want to find diversity in their environments. The Jewish example above wasn't flippant. Today, you hear from people who want Jewish lawyers (I won't unpack those assumptions here) but just a generation or two ago Jews were discriminated against significantly in the workforce, so their tendency to form distinctly Jewish law firms and practices was understandable. But of course today those forces are seen in different groups.

At the same time, leaving aside the privilege and potential cluelessness on my part, there's also valid information you may want to consider in the future, and hopefully I've managed to add some context to that.

Edited by Diplock
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6 minutes ago, DeepThree02 said:

Oh yes, totally right interacting with people of all kind is super important.

I was just stressing the important of a school where im not the only person of color, and a sizeable desi population would be the icing on the cake :)

TBH OP, desi people are some of the most present visible minorities on Ontario Campuses, in fact usually they are one of the largest visible minority groups 

See queens: https://law.queensu.ca/programs/jd/class-stats

Western: https://law.uwo.ca/future_students/jd_admissions/PDFs/Diversity Survey Results_2020.pdf

Osgoode: https://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/admissions-survey/

Looking at these figures shows the distribution is remarkably consistent. It also makes sense that the schools near the large cities have a higher representation of VMs--thats where they live .I will say that as a non-law Uwindsor student, their law population seems more diverse that these figures based on my anecdotal observations, and that seems to go along with their mission statement. 

EDIT: U Windsor does publish their stats, confirming my observations somewhat: https://www.uwindsor.ca/law/1089/diversity

 

so it seems if you want to go to a less "white" school (which seems to be what you are looking for to an extent) U windsor would be your best option. Its roughly moot everywhere else, and you will find 20-30 other south Asian diaspora

 

 

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13 minutes ago, artsydork said:

Many people have this concern going into practice. I made sure to find a queer friendly firm. Many lawyers do this/seek this. 

I feel you should probably go do your EDI hours, and speak to the criminal defence lawyers of colour near you about their experiences.

It’s also important to me to work in queer friendly spaces...and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wanting to work in a space where there’s a commitment to racial diversity as well? Which is what OP’s question was regarding? I’ll also point out, regarding OP limiting their future career possibilities...no where did they say that they would write off a school or job if it didn’t operate in a very diverse space. They are just prioritizing diversity, which is obviously a value to them. I think it’s a little premature to issue warnings regarding career limitations, when the OP is just inquiring which schools exemplify one of their values. 

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13 minutes ago, LawBlaw2019 said:

My personal comment on it being 2020 is that at this point even non-minorities, who were maybe sheltered in the past, have been exposed to a lot of information on the importance of representation to many people. So I didn't understand the confusion surrounding OP's wish to attend a school with other brown students. In no way do I mean that all POC, all members of a minority group, etc., prioritize (racial or other) diversity/representation at their school or in their larger communities. Would never assume that two people of the same race, religion, sex, etc. hold the same views. 

For sure! I shouldn't have said 'everyone' as my comment was really only directed at OP. 

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10 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

I’m a brown but not desi so idk if I’d be an adequate shade for OP’s table

I was stressing the importance of not being the only POC (a school with hispanics, blacks, etc... is amazing imo). Note how I said bonus points for brown/desi people- that was something additional, but if im at a school that is extremely diverse (where I am the only desi person) thats still fine by me haha

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2 minutes ago, 618194 said:

TBH OP, desi people are some of the most present visible minorities on Ontario Campuses, in fact usually they are one of the largest visible minority groups 

See queens: https://law.queensu.ca/programs/jd/class-stats

Western: https://law.uwo.ca/future_students/jd_admissions/PDFs/Diversity Survey Results_2020.pdf

Osgoode: https://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/admissions-survey/

Looking at these figures shows the distribution is remarkably consistent. It also makes sense that the schools near the large cities have a higher representation of VMs--thats where they live .I will say that as a non-law Uwindsor student, their law population seems more diverse that these figures based on my anecdotal observations, and that seems to go along with their mission statement. 

EDIT: U Windsor does publish their stats, confirming my observations somewhat: https://www.uwindsor.ca/law/1089/diversity

 

so it seems if you want to go to a less "white" school (which seems to be what you are looking for to an extent) U windsor would be your best option. Its roughly moot everywhere else, and you will find 20-30 other south Asian diaspora

 

 

Perfect, this helps so much.

Thank you!

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