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Alright so I calculated a 0.819, is that accurate with my scores? 

3.7/4.0 - so the ratio difference between 4/4.3 1.075 so I can just multiply 3.7 x 1.075 to figure out my 4.3 score correct? 

So it would be 3.97/4.3. 

LSAT: 160 

I think I calculated right, if I'm wrong please someone let me know!

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My understanding is that a 3.7 in say Ontario is a 3.67/4.3 on Dal's scale. I was also under the impression that it is converted into a % grade if it isn't already and then used. (LSAT percentile x 40%)+(%GPA x 60%)=index score, I am told from here that 0.81 is competitive but I remember hearing from an admissions session at Dal that 0.78 is generally competitive and generally Maritime and Non-Maritime students have roughly the same index averages. Do with that what you will.

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19 hours ago, Hopefullawstudenttt said:

Alright so I calculated a 0.819, is that accurate with my scores? 

3.7/4.0 - so the ratio difference between 4/4.3 1.075 so I can just multiply 3.7 x 1.075 to figure out my 4.3 score correct? 

So it would be 3.97/4.3. 

LSAT: 160 

I think I calculated right, if I'm wrong please someone let me know!

Hi, I think the safest way to do it is to convert your grades onto the 4.3 scale, then calculate the average that way because for me, this conversion does not convert my cGPA from 4-4.3 correctly.

Right now, my cGPA is 3.61 but 3.77/4.3 scale but L2 is 3.83/4 which miraculously is 4.15/4.3 scale. I think it's because each grade isn't necessary 1.075 apart when switched to 4.3 scale. For example:

(A+) 4.3/4 = 1.075

(A) 4/3.9 = 1.025

(A-) 3.7/3.7 = 1

(B+) 3.3/3.3 = 1 

... etc.

It's made this way to credit upper grades (A+ and As) more. I have a perfect A+ across my third year which is why my L2 is significantly more than my cGPA.

Here's Dals grade scale to get started: https://www.dal.ca/campus_life/academic-support/grades-and-student-records/grade-scale-and-definitions.html

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22 minutes ago, lawlizard said:

Hi, I think the safest way to do it is to convert your grades onto the 4.3 scale, then calculate the average that way because for me, this conversion does not convert my cGPA from 4-4.3 correctly.

Right now, my cGPA is 3.61 but 3.77/4.3 scale but L2 is 3.83/4 which miraculously is 4.15/4.3 scale. I think it's because each grade isn't necessary 1.075 apart when switched to 4.3 scale. For example:

(A+) 4.3/4 = 1.075

(A) 4/3.9 = 1.025

(A-) 3.7/3.7 = 1

(B+) 3.3/3.3 = 1 

... etc.

It's made this way to credit upper grades (A+ and As) more. I have a perfect A+ across my third year which is why my L2 is significantly more than my cGPA.

Here's Dals grade scale to get started: https://www.dal.ca/campus_life/academic-support/grades-and-student-records/grade-scale-and-definitions.html

So I add up all of the marks and then divide by the number of credits or ?? Sorry, I've just seen multiple ways to convert this and I haven't found a consistent way? 

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No worries! Divide by number of courses (only if your courses are all worth the same).

So say your semester grades were

A+, A, A+, B+ it would be (4.3 + 4 + 4.3 + 3.3)/4 (courses) = 15.9/4 = 3.975

If your courses are not worth the same, you would have to convert to a 4.3 scale, then multiple the grade by the number of credits and then divide by then number of total credits involved.

For example:

A+ (worth 3 credits), A (also worth 3 credits), A+ (worth 3 credits), B+ (worth credits) would be ((4.3x3)+(4x3)+(4.3x3)+(3.3x4))/13 (total number of credits per semester) = 51/13 = 3.92 

The reason why this one is lower than the first is because the B+ is worth .25 more than the other grades in this scenario. 

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45 minutes ago, lawlizard said:

No worries! Divide by number of courses (only if your courses are all worth the same).

So say your semester grades were

A+, A, A+, B+ it would be (4.3 + 4 + 4.3 + 3.3)/4 (courses) = 15.9/4 = 3.975

If your courses are not worth the same, you would have to convert to a 4.3 scale, then multiple the grade by the number of credits and then divide by then number of total credits involved.

For example:

A+ (worth 3 credits), A (also worth 3 credits), A+ (worth 3 credits), B+ (worth credits) would be ((4.3x3)+(4x3)+(4.3x3)+(3.3x4))/13 (total number of credits per semester) = 51/13 = 3.92 

The reason why this one is lower than the first is because the B+ is worth .25 more than the other grades in this scenario. 

Thanks so much, I figured it out!

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