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Bad to cancel LSAT score?

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Hey guys. I just received my Nov. 2020 lsat score and it actually turned out to be lower than expected. I was scoring high on my PT but my mark actually ended up being 5 marks lower than my PT scores and not only that, I went down 2 percentiles than my previous lsat that I took in Feb. Do you think I should cancel this score? I am planning on taking it in Jan 2021 now but I was just wondering if it looks bad to have a cancelled score on record. Thanks. 

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Forgive me if I'm mistaken, but I believe you can only cancel your score after seeing it if it is your first time writing the test or within 6 days if it's your 2nd (or 3rd, etc).

That being said, from everything I've read and heard, one cancelled score will hardly be held against you. If it becomes a trend, that's a different story-- but you should be fine cancelling the one.

Disclosure: probably people more informed than I am on here, but I talked to quite a few people and did my own research before cancelling my October score.

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I mean just put yourself in their shoes. If you have a horrible score and don't cancel, they will see it. But if you do end up cancelling, then they will assume you got a horrible score. So not really much different. Also all of the ON schools state that they take the highest LSAT score, so I don't really see why people stress over cancelling so much. If you apply to certain out of province schools, then that's a different story.

Edited by dahmad98

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27 minutes ago, dahmad98 said:

I mean just put yourself in their shoes. If you have a horrible score and don't cancel, they will see it. But if you do end up cancelling, then they will assume you got a horrible score. So not really much different. Also all of the ON schools state that they take the highest LSAT score, so I don't really see why people stress over cancelling so much. If you apply to certain out of province schools, then that's a different story.

I see your point, but that's not necessarily the case. You can cancel right after taking the test without knowing your score (say you had an off day, were ill on day of exam, etc). So you're right that they can and may assume you did badly, but there are other reasons people cancel, too, and they may look upon a cancelled score a little less critically than they would a bad score. 

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35 minutes ago, peacelily said:

I see your point, but that's not necessarily the case. You can cancel right after taking the test without knowing your score (say you had an off day, were ill on day of exam, etc). So you're right that they can and may assume you did badly, but there are other reasons people cancel, too, and they may look upon a cancelled score a little less critically than they would a bad score. 

My second point still stands though. Schools explicitly state that they consider the highest score (unless you consider UAlberta), so in the end it really does not matter what u decide to do.

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2 hours ago, dahmad98 said:

My second point still stands though. Schools explicitly state that they consider the highest score (unless you consider UAlberta), so in the end it really does not matter what u decide to do.

U of T actually looks at all scores, though they place more importance on the highest. Whether this matters in the end, I don't know-- but it's worth a thought.

 From U of T Law's site: "If more than one LSAT score is reported, all LSAT scores will be seen and considered by the Admissions Committee. Generally, we place emphasis on the highest LSAT score reported."

Your point certainly stands for the majority of schools, but I just think it would be a good idea for the OP to look into whatever schools they are interested in to be sure of their specific admissions criteria. 

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