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dgallach

Chances: 3.66/4 GPA, 157 LSAT.

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I am considering the January 2021 LSAT (plus a tutor) to score 160+. Should I make this financial investment? 

Queens will not look at my best two/last two semesters, since they are not consecutive (due to co-op terms and an exchange), so I didn't bother calculating that.

I graduated my undergraduate degree in 2016, working full time since, and roughly 2 years volunteering.

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These few points on the LSAT make all the difference. 

Am I correct in interpreting that your present, official score is 157?

If so, getting 160+ could boos you from a "maybe" to a "probably."

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44 minutes ago, SNAILS said:

Am I correct in interpreting that your present, official score is 157?

Hey! Yes - 157, score release today. 
I agree. I think I'll go for round two... 

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I got in last year with a 3.75 and 157. Softs are hard to judge so I won't try, but with a couple years work experience. 

I think it was in April or May I heard back? Sometime in the latter half, but not the absolute end iirc. Agree with others that one more write may be worth the grind.

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