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I'm a Current 1L - ask me anything!

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As the title says :)

This forum helped me a lot when I was in the application cycle and I'd really like to pay it forward!

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Would you say the transition from undergrad to law school was more difficult than high school to undergrad?

 

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How difficult was it to find housing in Kingston (assuming you're living in Kingston for the school year) - how has the student experience been in the COVID year?

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I'll chime in here since I'm currently procrastinating:

1 hour ago, JJ1990 said:

Would you say the transition from undergrad to law school was more difficult than high school to undergrad?

 

I'd say the transition is less difficult, but maybe that's because we're online this year. Some courses are harder than others, but if you've established good study habits, then you'll be okay. Queen's does a good job of making you feel like you're a part of a community, so there are always resources to help you succeed. Upper years are more than willing to help, and you'll meet peers to study with. We also have a tutor program which pairs you with an upper year that did well the previous year, so that's also very helpful. 

17 minutes ago, ReeseWitherfork said:

How difficult was it to find housing in Kingston (assuming you're living in Kingston for the school year) - how has the student experience been in the COVID year?

I looked for housing quite late and there were a few options available. Depending on your living standards, it could be hard or easy to find a place. The biggest issue is finding a good landlord lol, a lot of them are quite scummy.

The student experience has been as good as it can be. Kingston has been relatively good with keeping cases low, so I've been able to make a small group of friends that I hangout with regularly. It obviously isn't the classic QL experience, but everyone comes here wanting to make friends so it hasn't been difficult to find people to be around. All in all, I'm happy I came here and I've enjoyed my experience so far :) 

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Do you find yourself to be overwhelmed with the workload? Approximately how many hours a week do you spend on school work? 

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2 hours ago, Cado97 said:

Do you find yourself to be overwhelmed with the workload? Approximately how many hours a week do you spend on school work? 

I can answer this. For me personally, I do not find it overwhelming. Obviously there is a lot of work, but if you stick to a schedule you can get it all done. For context, I get up very early and usually work throughout the day until around 5 or so, taking breaks for class and to eat lunch. On the weekends, I work throughout the whole day. I used to take Saturday off but I do not anymore because exams are coming up. As a result of the way I schedule my day, I always have plenty of free time after dinner, which is really nice. Some of my friends/people in my section get up at around 10:30am, and honestly I don't know how they get all their work done. In sum, I think it is manageable if you go to bed early and wake up early, that is what has worked for me anyway.

I would say I spend about 60 hours on school a week (including class and my 30 minute lunch breaks). I really enjoy the material (for the most part) so I really do not mind. 

Hope this helps.

Edited by souflee
Grammar
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7 hours ago, Cado97 said:

Do you find yourself to be overwhelmed with the workload? Approximately how many hours a week do you spend on school work? 

I can also chime in here, as I’m procrastinating my legal writing assignment. The workload is not overwhelming but it’s quite close to the line. If your motivated and dedicated, it’s totally doable to finish all of your readings and assignments (with maybe a few late nights/early mornings). 
 

In terms of hours, it really depends on the week. I would say that between class time and readings, I spent an average 8-10 hours a day (though sometimes 12). Earlier in the semester it was doable to have more of a 9-5 schedule. I don’t know how some people work or have kids/a busy social life while in law school. I don’t think I’d be able to handle that. Now that exams are coming in, I’m working at least 10 hours a day. Part of this is because I slacked off in one of my classes because I really wasn’t enjoying it (and I’m paying for that now as learning the material has become a part of every day). Overall I’m realizing these next few weeks are going to be a big grind. However I am also aiming for top grades, I think if your content with riding the curve to a B-ish average you would have a lot more time to do other things. 

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5 hours ago, souflee said:

I can answer this. For me personally, I do not find it overwhelming. Obviously there is a lot of work, but if you stick to a schedule you can get it all done. For context, I get up very early and usually work throughout the day until around 5 or so, taking breaks for class and to eat lunch. On the weekends, I work throughout the whole day. I used to take Saturday off but I do not anymore because exams are coming up. As a result of the way I schedule my day, I always have plenty of free time after dinner, which is really nice. Some of my friends/people in my section get up at around 10:30am, and honestly I don't know how they get all their work done. In sum, I think it is manageable if you go to bed early and wake up early, that is what has worked for me anyway.

I would say I spend about 60 hours on school a week (including class and my 30 minute lunch breaks). I really enjoy the material (for the most part) so I really do not mind. 

Hope this helps.

The point you made about enjoying the material is very interesting! I hope that once I get into law school, I will be able to naturally like what I am studying, and maybe that will make law school a little bit less difficult.

How would you say the culture at Queen's is? How supportive are students and faculty? 

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11 hours ago, legallybound said:

The point you made about enjoying the material is very interesting! I hope that once I get into law school, I will be able to naturally like what I am studying, and maybe that will make law school a little bit less difficult.

How would you say the culture at Queen's is? How supportive are students and faculty? 

Honestly, Queen's is such an amazing place to go to law school! The collegiality here is very real. I have not met ONE person who isn't willing to help. Everyone wants everyone to succeed and everyone is super nice. I also think the faculty is pretty supportive - we have a really good wellness program :)

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On 11/24/2020 at 10:34 AM, tornyc said:

What were your stats? 

I had a 159 lsat, 3.32 cgpa and 3.64 l2

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4 hours ago, lawcat said:

Honestly, Queen's is such an amazing place to go to law school! The collegiality here is very real. I have not met ONE person who isn't willing to help. Everyone wants everyone to succeed and everyone is super nice. I also think the faculty is pretty supportive - we have a really good wellness program :)

Thank you for answering!! Have you been able to get involved in any extra-curriculars so far? How easy/hard is it to become involved and receive opportunities? 

I know Queen's has a few very strong legal clinics, and I have heard they are very competitive to get into. Any tips?

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4 hours ago, legallybound said:

Thank you for answering!! Have you been able to get involved in any extra-curriculars so far? How easy/hard is it to become involved and receive opportunities? 

I know Queen's has a few very strong legal clinics, and I have heard they are very competitive to get into. Any tips?

I can answer this - clubs were quite competitive this year. Most clubs saw a record number of applicants this year and said it was super competitive. I do think this is because we weren't busy with in-person activities as Queen's had a self-isolation period until mid-late September and most apps were due by then. My suggestion is to apply to everything you're interested in if you want to get involved, I think on average you'll get maybe 1/4 positions you apply to. 

We apply for clinics in Feb I think so we won't know much more until that point, but I have heard that they're relatively competitive to get into. Check back in with us in March and we'll probably have a better idea hahaha. 

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On 11/29/2020 at 12:27 PM, souflee said:

I can answer this. For me personally, I do not find it overwhelming. Obviously there is a lot of work, but if you stick to a schedule you can get it all done. For context, I get up very early and usually work throughout the day until around 5 or so, taking breaks for class and to eat lunch. On the weekends, I work throughout the whole day. I used to take Saturday off but I do not anymore because exams are coming up. As a result of the way I schedule my day, I always have plenty of free time after dinner, which is really nice. Some of my friends/people in my section get up at around 10:30am, and honestly I don't know how they get all their work done. In sum, I think it is manageable if you go to bed early and wake up early, that is what has worked for me anyway.

I would say I spend about 60 hours on school a week (including class and my 30 minute lunch breaks). I really enjoy the material (for the most part) so I really do not mind. 

Hope this helps.

Sounds overwhelming to me.

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14 minutes ago, Mihael said:

Sounds overwhelming to me.

To be fair, I wake up at 10:30 AM (sometimes later) and still get all my readings/work done in time. (As do all my friends) I've also been doing pretty well thus far- all of my feedback so far have been positive.

It's all about budgeting your time effectively. As you go through your first semester, you'll figure out quickly what materials you should read and how to read them! I would say I study around 20 hours a week additional to classes and tutorials. 

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3 hours ago, legalpotato said:

It's all about budgeting your time effectively. As you go through your first semester, you'll figure out quickly what materials you should read and how to read them! I would say I study around 20 hours a week additional to classes and tutorials. 

20 hours a week sounds pretty reasonable and not too overwhelming. Are you doing well in law school studying 20 hours a week (getting average or above-average grades)? Also, are you implying with your statement on readings that it's not necessary to do all the assigned readings?

I will be start lawschool September 2021 so I appreciate your response and any additional advice.

Edited by Mihael

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1 hour ago, Mihael said:

20 hours a week sounds pretty reasonable and not too overwhelming. Are you doing well in law school studying 20 hours a week (getting average or above-average grades)? Also, are you implying with your statement on readings that it's not necessary to do all the assigned readings?

I will be start lawschool September 2021 so I appreciate your response and any additional advice.

I've gotten above average on all of the assessments we've had so far (assignments + midterms + legal memo). However I'm only in my first semester of 1L so we'll see how the remainder of my classes go and where I end up! 

And with the topic of readings - the first few weeks of law school, I read through every sentence of every reading I had and quickly realized this was neither needed nor that helpful for myself. The way I approach readings now is based on class by class. Some classes have professors who really likes quotes directly from the readings, so I make sure to do all my readings in that class. Other classes require to grasp the bigger picture, which is where I use upper year notes to give me an understanding of course materials prior to class and then I fill in gaps within the lecture. If I'm struggling with a topic within class, I do go back and make sure to read over the reading again to ensure I got what the main points. 

Also, I found most professors have been very fair when it comes to readings. I definitely do read substantially more than I did in my undergrad- however it has been very manageable. The only readings that have been a pain have been the ones that are very old and I have no clue as to what the words even mean so it takes a longer time to read. Otherwise it has not been an issue at all. 

My biggest tip would be to connect with upper years and get your hands on good upper year summaries, they really do help! 

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