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exocytosis646

How competitive would my GPA/LSAT scores need to be to get accepted as a 3rd yr?

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8 hours ago, ThomasShelby said:

Other point no ones mentioned, you have no clue how you'll do on the LSAT. I know a girl with a 4.0 that got a 155 and I scored 178 and 179 on timed practice tests, had a 175 practice test average on my last 20 practice tests and still ended up with a 167 with my shitty 3.4-3.5. Planning to go in your third year is ridiculous. If it happens, great. But I surely wouldn't count on it (as in plan for it) unless you're genuinely a genius. And I don't mean smart, I genuinely mean a genius. There are so many factors going into a law application that honestly requires a lot of luck. Two bad classes or one bad LSAT could ruin your chances at 3rd year since the requirements are so high. So basically, ya try and if you get in great, but by no means should you write the lsat 3 times in your second year and screw around with your degree to try and get in third year. If it happens, it happens. 

I did a practice diagnostic with no prep whatsoever and got a 169..... as a 17 yr old, so I am really confident in my abilities

And most of the schools im interested in view 3rd yrs and 4th yrs equally- so applying as a 4th yr would not make things easier.

If my grades are fine in 3rd yr- ima apply. Im actually writing the lsat the summer before 2nd yr- just cause im applying to UofA as a 2nd yr.... i know two people who got in as 2nd yrs, and im confident ill have similar if not better stats.

 

I do appreciate the honestly, thanks!

 

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Aight welp, all I wanted to know what what type of stats id need to get in for uofC law as a 3rd yr, and I wasnt able to get any help from anyone who commented here.

Luckily for me, someone who got into uofC law as a 3rd year pmed, and told me a 3.85+ and 165+ on the lsat is competitive enough to get into uofc law as a 3rd yr.... they actually got in with similar stats.

So I will be applying to all ontario schools (whom accept 3rd yrs), as well as UBC, and UofA/UofC Law schools in 3rd yr.! I will not be responding to any more comments of anyone here, and im sorry if anything i said triggered arts majors (just stated what all my upper yr friends in STEM have told me)

So good luck to the rest of you guys applying to law schools.... hope yall do well whether you are applying as a 4th, or 5th yr, or as a 3rd yr like me!

Best of luck :)

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2 minutes ago, legallybrunette3 said:

you can't compare an elective to a required course. That's another flaw. 

Your sample size is also unrepresentative. It includes anecdotal evidence from friends of yours, and things you've heard from other student. You also may have skills conducive to succeeding in STEM courses and don't practice music or art, so yes they'll all seem easier.

 

These are all flaws that were present in your argument, that you would find in a typical logical reasoning question on the LSAT. Good luck with it! 

 

I mean i did do well on the lsat logic practice tests... so tbh it doesnt matter whether you think i am flaws in my arguments or not lmaoo. Stats and ECs are the things that matter most to law schools. They're the ones judging me- not you lol

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4 minutes ago, exocytosis646 said:

heheh i loved that portion on the lsat surprisingly

 

I agree that for some people science may be easier... i just gave the example of me and my friends in upper years. There were a couple essay writing courses that ik upper yr arts major thought were hard, but my friends in 3rd yr took them and got A+

For us, an arts degree overall is way easier

And im just saying there is a reason why the stereotype of an art degree being easy asf exists

Damn, you sure seem to have a rather omniscient POV. The stereotype exists because self-proclaimed pre-meds are paranoid they won't get into med school (and with that attitude, rightfully so) and so perpetuate the myth that everyone else had it easier than them (see immature and and insecure). 

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8 minutes ago, MountainMon said:

Damn, you sure seem to have a rather omniscient POV. The stereotype exists because self-proclaimed pre-meds are paranoid they won't get into med school (and with that attitude, rightfully so) and so perpetuate the myth that everyone else had it easier than them (see immature and and insecure). 

hahaha believe it or not, but med school is actually my top choice

Im only applying to law schools as a backup since its easy asf to get in, and the lsat compared to the mcat is so easy

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Alright.  I spliced the "debate" topic into the megathread I linked if you want to continue, but it looks like the OP knows better than everyone else so there's no point anyone trying to engage here further.

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