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Ethanchen

3-year bachelor for overseas applicant?

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Hi, I am a permanent resident of Canada and want to pay all my dues to become a lawyer in Canada.

First of all, let me share some information about where I am now:

1. I have several degrees overseas: 2000-2003, Associate Degree in Business Administration.

                                                              2003-2005, Bachelor of Degree in Business Administration.

                                                              2009-2012, Master of Degree in Business Administration.

2. I am looking to pursue a Bachelor degree here for two reasons: A. My gap in university was not high. B. I am planning 3-4 years to prepare the LSAT, I want to go back to university rather than prepare that alone. I am wondering if I can choose some 3-year program. As far as I known, most of the law school applicants have 4-year bachelor degree. So is there any disadvantage if I take an 3-year program?

Since I am newcomer here, any input even nothing to do with the question above will be helpful.

Thank you very much.

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Most Canadian Law Schools consider your first undergrad degree only.

You may qualify under "mature" category . I don't think you need 3-4 years to prepare LSAT. 

I don't think  doing another B.A. in Canada improve your chance. 

 "I am a permanent resident of Canada and want to pay all my dues to become a lawyer in Canada."

I don't see the co-relation between 'pay all your dues' by "becoming a lawyer in Canada'. 

Are you in Canada now? How long have you been away?

Edited by Luckycharm

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6 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

Most Canadian Law Schools consider your first undergrad degree only.

You may qualify under "mature" category . I don't think you need 3-4 years to prepare LSAT. 

I don't think  doing another B.A. in Canada improve your chance. 

 "I am a permanent resident of Canada and want to pay all my dues to become a lawyer in Canada."

I don't see the co-relation between 'pay all your dues' by "becoming a lawyer in Canada'. 

Are you in Canada now? How long have you been away?

Thank you for your reply. It's really important to me.  

I will reach out to the law schools to make sure if they will take my second degree's grade. If they only consider my first undergrad degree, I don't want to pursue a second B.A. in Canada.

Sorry for the misunderstanding, what I wanted to say is " pay my dues in all the hard work to become a lawyer in Canada".

I have been in Canada for two years.

 

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