Jump to content
Seekingredemption

OLSAS and French Accents

Recommended Posts

Hi/bonjour, 

To anyone applying to the common law français program, have you been having difficulty with accents registering in OLSAS?

For some reason, OLSAS decided that they are cool with every accent except the ligature (œ) accent. 

I have half a mind to just type out "oe" instead and submit this application, but on the other hand I want this application to be free of faults.

Merci de l'aide. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the OLSAS system does have flaws. A lot of people actually found the commas were just stripped away from their text, so make sure to double check. I think you should try and find a synonym but otherwise just leave the word. It won't make or break if you get in or not in my opinion. (I'm a 1L in the PDC program)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Sponge

I sent them a complaint but highly doubt they’ll fix that.

I’ll look for a synonym I guess...

Would you know by chance if the 20 students admitted to the PDC program count towards the total admitted to the Common law français program? 
 

I believe I heard that somewhere but I’m not certain how that works.

Thanks!

Edited by Seekingredemption
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Seekingredemption said:

Would you know by chance if the 20 students admitted to the PDC program count towards the total admitted to the Common law français program? 
 

Yes, they do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @Sponge and @Isla

Could either of you speak to how french second language students fair in the common law français program or the PDC program?

I have a fairly good level of french (probably C1 level or close) but I wonder whether this is sufficient to succeed in the program.

I know a francophone in one of those programs who is having a hard time, so I’m very curious to get your perspectives on this. 
 

Thank you :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Seekingredemption said:

Thanks @Sponge and @Isla

Could either of you speak to how french second language students fair in the common law français program or the PDC program?

I have a fairly good level of french (probably C1 level or close) but I wonder whether this is sufficient to succeed in the program.

I know a francophone in one of those programs who is having a hard time, so I’m very curious to get your perspectives on this. 
 

Thank you :)

 

My mother-tongue is French, and I did my last 6 years of education in English, and I am doing pretty good. In the French program, you have a class called "Compétences" where they go over your French and you learn a lot. There is also a non-graded French diagnostics test in September, and the school organized extra tutoring sessions for the students that they feel needs it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I'm not the person you asked, but I had a 2.95 cGPA from UBC (Arts), L2 3.4 and B2 3.6. I had a 164 LSAT. I got into TRU after initially being waitlisted for a few weeks.  I was never told what worked in my favour, but I had a Film Studies degree, work experience in photography, video production, and marketing, and a lot of volunteer experience. I've heard TRU looks at your L3, with emphasis on your L2. If you can swing a 160+ you should be good to go.
    • I had the OP's stats almost exactly (except that I had a 2.89 CGPA).  Back then, I applied at every English-language law school in the country that existed. In the 2012 cycle, I was accepted at UVic, the University of Alberta, the University of Saskatchewan, UNB and Windsor.  I ended up being waitlisted at Ottawa and at Western.  I was rejected everywhere else.  I should note that I generally applied as an access/discretionary candidate. I had volunteered at a food bank, done independent research in undergrad, helped with other pro bono literature research, and held a bunch of other extracurriculars. Much more importantly (in my mind and likely in the minds of the various admissions committees), I suffered and suffer from cystic fibrosis, Hemophilia A and chronic pain from a botched foot surgery.
    • I understand where you're coming from, and the same logic is why so many people major in polisci, philosophy, and criminology as a precursor to law school. The reality is that there's no correlation between legal experience/education and success in law school. Admissions committees know this. Additionally, there's a lot of value in accepting students with diverse educational and professional backgrounds. It makes for better, more educational discussions in the class room. Having legal experience/education gives you more substance when it comes to explaining why you want to go to law school, but that's pretty much the extent of your advantage.
    • I agree, it wasn’t for that reason. I just personally think that it helps. Why do I think this? Because I have nothing else on my application but a bunch of legal related experiences and education. 
    • Nobody in admissions at any law school in Canada is going to be impressed by a paralegal degree. Just because people with that background got in to law school doesn't mean that they were admitted for that reason.

×
×
  • Create New...