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exocytosis646

Do law schools look at your grades the yr you apply? Grade drops as 3rd yr applicant?

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If I was planning on applying to law schools (in my 3rd yr), would they only look at my first and second yr grades?

Or would they also look at my 3rd yr grades (after I got an offer) to see if i maintained my grades?

Additionally do schools also drop lowest credits/ give us a boost like they do for 4th yr applicants? I cant remember the exact term, but yall know what Im talking about?

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I'm a 3rd year applying to schools in western Canada (these schools have let 3rd years in previously). At UBC, they look at your first 2 years worth of grades, and if you meet the cutoff threshold, give you a conditional offer based on your cGPA not dropping below a certain level. They also drop 6 credits worth of courses in your cGPA calculation. UVic waits to see your 3rd year fall semester grades before admitting 3rd years. This is based off what I have seen on the forum in previous years, hope it helps!

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I think it's quite rare for them to take students that aren't in their 4th year, so I would ask the schools you're looking at directly. 

Also, unless you have some extraordinary life EC's, if you're needing to drop grades, you're likely not competitive as a non-degree holder. 

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On 11/19/2020 at 4:16 PM, legallybrunette3 said:

I think it's quite rare for them to take students that aren't in their 4th year, so I would ask the schools you're looking at directly. 

Also, unless you have some extraordinary life EC's, if you're needing to drop grades, you're likely not competitive as a non-degree holder. 

Ive aiming to finish this yr with between a 3.85-4.0, so id say i am somewhat competive.

However, i was just curious if i would get grade drops still

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On 11/19/2020 at 4:13 PM, ap4750 said:

I'm a 3rd year applying to schools in western Canada (these schools have let 3rd years in previously). At UBC, they look at your first 2 years worth of grades, and if you meet the cutoff threshold, give you a conditional offer based on your cGPA not dropping below a certain level. They also drop 6 credits worth of courses in your cGPA calculation. UVic waits to see your 3rd year fall semester grades before admitting 3rd years. This is based off what I have seen on the forum in previous years, hope it helps!

Do you happen to have ig you could pm me? Im also interested in western canada law schools

Also i checked website for UBC and i said they drop your lowest 6 credits if you apply as a 4th yr/with a degree? Where did you hear they omit credits for ppl applying in 3rd yr?

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1 hour ago, exocytosis646 said:

Do you happen to have ig you could pm me? Im also interested in western canada law schools

Also i checked website for UBC and i said they drop your lowest 6 credits if you apply as a 4th yr/with a degree? Where did you hear they omit credits for ppl applying in 3rd yr?

Feel free to PM me on this forum, not IG. My knowledge on schools is limited to my current status as an applicant, so I'm not sure how much help I would be. 

The info is here, and I have also heard it through getting my GPA confirmed: http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=12,207,358,327 

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10 hours ago, ap4750 said:

Feel free to PM me on this forum, not IG. My knowledge on schools is limited to my current status as an applicant, so I'm not sure how much help I would be. 

The info is here, and I have also heard it through getting my GPA confirmed: http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=12,207,358,327 

dude i clicked the link you shared, and i cant see where it says how many credits 3rd yr applicants have dropped

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5 minutes ago, exocytosis646 said:

dude i clicked the link you shared, and i cant see where it says how many credits 3rd yr applicants have dropped

First paragraph of the "transcript" header. Or control+F "third year"

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