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Sonesheka

Advice on where to take financial aid for law school?

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Hi there!

I was wondering what are the best banks to go with when it comes to applying for loans to pay for law school? I have always been with BMO but I keep hearing a lot of people take student loans from Scotia bank? Or is it better in the long run to take a private loan from somewhere else? I am paying for my own schooling, and the program I am looking into is the Dual JD (Cad-Us) at UWindsor + Mercy Law. Thank you!

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I'm curious why you want a dual JD? AFAIK Mercy Law is one of the more predatory American schools.

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1)"Student Loans" generally refers to government student loans, not loans from a bank. Make sure you are looking into your eligbility for student loans as a first stem.

2) The products thank banks provide to students are not loans, but lines of credit, typically marketed as "Professional Student Line of Credit", so that is probably your best bet as a "search string". Banks used to administer some student loans (I had a government-backed loan administed by RBC; shows how old I am), but not anymore as far as I know. 

3) There is some mild variation in experience here, but you are correct that Scotiabank is generally the most popular choice for LOC. TD may be second place, but I'm not sure. I've heard a few people speak higly of RBC in specific circumstances, but I don't know that I've ever heard of someone getting a good deal from BMO (or CIBC). So chances are, your best bet will be to start with CIBC.

4) Strong consensus on here is that the Dual JD should be your last possible choice of law school in Canada. I don't have much to add on that as I haven't looked into the program, but... please do your research carefully before choosing that program!

-GM

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3 hours ago, MountainMon said:

I'm curious why you want a dual JD? AFAIK Mercy Law is one of the more predatory American schools.

What do you mean by predatory? I most likely am going to have my main major as immigration law, I for sure want to have a dual qualification and usa is the closest (plus never thought about working in UK or even immigrating) and talking to people who studied in the UK and came back to Canada, they have always told me USA is probably better choice than UK.

Edited by Sonesheka

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3 hours ago, GrumpyMountie said:

1)"Student Loans" generally refers to government student loans, not loans from a bank. Make sure you are looking into your eligbility for student loans as a first stem.

2) The products thank banks provide to students are not loans, but lines of credit, typically marketed as "Professional Student Line of Credit", so that is probably your best bet as a "search string". Banks used to administer some student loans (I had a government-backed loan administed by RBC; shows how old I am), but not anymore as far as I know. 

3) There is some mild variation in experience here, but you are correct that Scotiabank is generally the most popular choice for LOC. TD may be second place, but I'm not sure. I've heard a few people speak higly of RBC in specific circumstances, but I don't know that I've ever heard of someone getting a good deal from BMO (or CIBC). So chances are, your best bet will be to start with CIBC.

4) Strong consensus on here is that the Dual JD should be your last possible choice of law school in Canada. I don't have much to add on that as I haven't looked into the program, but... please do your research carefully before choosing that program!

-GM

Thank you so much for the insight, GM!

 

Why do you think a dual JD should be my last choice? I love hearing other opinions on such topic since I never get the same answer :) Will help me come to a final decision for sure!

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3 hours ago, MountainMon said:

I'm curious why you want a dual JD? AFAIK Mercy Law is one of the more predatory American schools.

Ah, I see what you mean now.. It is one of two options combined with Ontario schools and it seems like the most doable route for me since it will only require me to move to Windsor rather than having to dish out more money I already don't/won't have to go to Washington State 😕

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39 minutes ago, Sonesheka said:

What do you mean by predatory? I most likely am going to have my main major as immigration law, I for sure want to have a dual qualification and usa is the closest (plus never thought about working in UK or even immigrating) and talking to people who studied in the UK and came back to Canada, they have always told me USA is probably better choice than UK.

I mean it’s a shitty school with outrageous tuition and exceptionally poor employment and bar passage prospects. Why do you want a dual qualification? What does the UK have to do with anything? Why is your other option to go to Washington state?

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2 minutes ago, MountainMon said:

I mean it’s a shitty school with outrageous tuition and exceptionally poor employment and bar passage prospects. Why do you want a dual qualification? What does the UK have to do with anything? Why is your other option to go to Washington state?

I went to look at other forums on here and reddit, plus looked into statistics and you are absolutely correct, my jaw dropped at both the passing and employment percentage from 2019. I want to be licensed in Canada as well as another country, seeing how I am most likely going into immigration that's the "logical route" (from other peoples opinions). A lot of people go to law school in the UK to have dual qualifications and have told me they had terrible luck getting employed in Canada, which from what I have been reading is the same situation with Mercy Law.. I believe UOttawa is partners with W State and Mercy if I decide to take the dual JD route. From everything I've seen that is a massive mistake and I am better off going back to school for American law separately after I have finished Canadian LS as Mercy employment rates are extremely low. I still have a couple years until I have to go to law school, so thank god I decided to post something now rather than down the line when it was "too late".

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8 minutes ago, Sonesheka said:

I went to look at other forums on here and reddit, plus looked into statistics and you are absolutely correct, my jaw dropped at both the passing and employment percentage from 2019. I want to be licensed in Canada as well as another country, seeing how I am most likely going into immigration that's the "logical route" (from other peoples opinions). A lot of people go to law school in the UK to have dual qualifications and have told me they had terrible luck getting employed in Canada, which from what I have been reading is the same situation with Mercy Law.. I believe UOttawa is pa I want to be licensed in Canada as well as another countryrtners with W State and Mercy if I decide to take the dual JD route. From everything I've seen that is a massive mistake and I am better off going back to school for American law separately after I have finished Canadian LS as Mercy employment rates are extremely low. I still have a couple years until I have to go to law school, so thank god I decided to post something now rather than down the line when it was "too late".

"I want to be licensed in Canada as well as another country"

Are you planning to eventually sit for the Michigan Bar exam too ?

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11 minutes ago, Sonesheka said:

I went to look at other forums on here and reddit, plus looked into statistics and you are absolutely correct, my jaw dropped at both the passing and employment percentage from 2019. I want to be licensed in Canada as well as another country, seeing how I am most likely going into immigration that's the "logical route" (from other peoples opinions). A lot of people go to law school in the UK to have dual qualifications and have told me they had terrible luck getting employed in Canada, which from what I have been reading is the same situation with Mercy Law.. I believe UOttawa is partners with W State and Mercy if I decide to take the dual JD route. From everything I've seen that is a massive mistake and I am better off going back to school for American law separately after I have finished Canadian LS as Mercy employment rates are extremely low. I still have a couple years until I have to go to law school, so thank god I decided to post something now rather than down the line when it was "too late".

I’m confused, do you think you need an American JD to do immigration law? The people who go to the UK for law school aren’t doing it for dual qualifications, as far as I know no such program exists between Canadian and UK law schools. The people going to the UK for law school are people who for whatever reason couldn’t get in here, or people who are rich, or some combination of the two.

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To be clear, it is not that normal for immigration lawyers to qualified in multiple jurisdictions and it is insane to do multiple law degrees. The joint programs are not worth it because the Canadian degrees are all so much stronger. 

For the most part immigration is a very low paying area of law. Why are you interested in this area? Because a lot of immigrants don't have a lot of money.

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OP's posts make so little sense it's impossible to even correct misconceptions and give them advice, because there is nothing sensical to grasp onto and use as a starting point to guide them.

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Immigration Law is not a lucrative field, but no one here will condemn you for doing it if it's what you want. It can definitely be meaningful work. But yeah; don't do a dual program, paying an insanely high tuition, as an "in" to doing one of the lowest-paid kinds of legal work.

Your main goal should be getting into a "normal" Canadian law program if you can. I am not too sure of the ins and outs of being one of those lawyers doing immigration work on both sides of the border - like that guy in Washington the CBC always calls when they need to write a story quickly - but I think that would be a very niche area and premature for you to target right now.

-GM

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4 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

"I want to be licensed in Canada as well as another country"

Are you planning to eventually sit for the Michigan Bar exam too ?

if I want to be licensed then yes of course I know I am going to have to sit through it

 

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2 hours ago, CleanHands said:

OP's posts make so little sense it's impossible to even correct misconceptions and give them advice, because there is nothing sensical to grasp onto and use as a starting point to guide them.

English is not my first language. The title states its for ideas on how to finance myself through law school. I put the program I am going into for reference/context

Edited by Sonesheka

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4 hours ago, MountainMon said:

I’m confused, do you think you need an American JD to do immigration law? The people who go to the UK for law school aren’t doing it for dual qualifications, as far as I know no such program exists between Canadian and UK law schools. The people going to the UK for law school are people who for whatever reason couldn’t get in here, or people who are rich, or some combination of the two.

No no, I am aware if I was to stick strictly to Canadian Immigration law I just need to do a normal JD. I want to also be licensed in US immigration law so thought this would be the most "doable" route to take.

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6 hours ago, Sonesheka said:

English is not my first language. The title states its for ideas on how to finance myself through law school. I put the program I am going into for reference/context

To clarify, the issue here is not that you are failing to communicate your ideas due to a language barrier. The issue is that you are successfully communicating ideas that make no sense.

6 hours ago, Sonesheka said:

No no, I am aware if I was to stick strictly to Canadian Immigration law I just need to do a normal JD. I want to also be licensed in US immigration law so thought this would be the most "doable" route to take.

Everyone in this thread is repeatedly telling you that a second degree is not sensible or necessary to practice immigration law, and that you should just get a Canadian JD. I don't know what's so difficult about this concept for you.

It frankly sounds like you got some bad advice from some idiots who got UK LLBs and then discovered what virtually anyone on this forum would tell you; that that will not count for much in Canada.

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On 11/18/2020 at 11:03 PM, CleanHands said:

OP's posts make so little sense it's impossible to even correct misconceptions and give them advice, because there is nothing sensical to grasp onto and use as a starting point to guide them.

There was no point in this type of hostility. Be kind.

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On 11/18/2020 at 9:51 PM, Mal said:

To be clear, it is not that normal for immigration lawyers to qualified in multiple jurisdictions and it is insane to do multiple law degrees. The joint programs are not worth it because the Canadian degrees are all so much stronger. 

For the most part immigration is a very low paying area of law. Why are you interested in this area? Because a lot of immigrants don't have a lot of money.

OP - this is the most important post in this thread. You likely would not be practicing immigration law in multiple jurisdictions, and you will be entirely capable of practicing immigration law licensed in a single jurisdiction. There's no sense in taking on twice the debt to earn two degrees, especially given the relatively low-paying nature of immigration legal work.

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