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sucksatusernames

Tricks for studying during a heavy semester?

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Like the title says above, I have a lot on my plate with work and school this semester and I've already signed up for the April LSAT, my score on PT's has improved a lot but now I keep getting things wrong, even questions that were easy for me during the diagnostic so I think burnout is approaching.  

Anyone managed to pull off school/work/LSAT before? Any tips? For context, I've been using Khan Academy and 7 sage for the most part and ordered a copy of the LSAT trainer to read over the holidays. I "told" khan academy I was writing the LSAT end of this month so that I would go through all the stages once at least before moving on to other books etc. 

Thanks! 

 

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2 minutes ago, sucksatusernames said:

Like the title says above, I have a lot on my plate with work and school this semester and I've already signed up for the April LSAT, my score on PT's has improved a lot but now I keep getting things wrong, even questions that were easy for me during the diagnostic so I think burnout is approaching.  

Anyone managed to pull off school/work/LSAT before? Any tips? For context, I've been using Khan Academy and 7 sage for the most part and ordered a copy of the LSAT trainer to read over the holidays. I "told" khan academy I was writing the LSAT end of this month so that I would go through all the stages once at least before moving on to other books etc. 

Thanks! 

 

Why don't you switch it to summer? You are not applying this cycle right?

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Is there a summer LSAT? When I went to register it only gave me dates until April.  That said, I really would like that better as my workload will be significantly lower. 

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2 minutes ago, sucksatusernames said:

and no applying next cycle (start law school sept 2022) 

You will have more time for the summer test..

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17 minutes ago, sucksatusernames said:

you're right, I'll revisit the site to see about changing it.  thanks! 

Put your efforts on your studies now.. 

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hey! 

I've been studying on-and-off again for the LSAT during the school year as well! Though it is incredibly difficult to stay on top of things, some of the things I think I learned have been: 1) do a little every day (even if it's 30 minutes or an hour of studying) 2) prioritize the quality of your reviewing over quantity 3) and try to do one pt every weekend or one pt every 2 weeks.

I'm in the same boat as you! I've taken a week-long break at this point LOL 

But good luck to us!

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General advice on cutting down review time for LR: when I would do practice tests and reached a question that I was either blindly guessing or wasn't positive about, I'd note it somehow on the bubble sheet (e.g. If I was debating between A and D and ultimately chose 'A', I'd bubble in A but mark a line through D). When I was pressed for time on review I would only review the questions I was either wrong or unsure about. Another strategy I used which made review itself take longer but was more effective overall was this: I would do an entire LSAT under timed conditions, and not review the answers. The following day I would do the SAME practice test, but under no time constraint. If I needed a significant amount of time to think about a question, I'd take it. I then reviewed both attempts at the same test together. If I got an answer wrong the first time but not the second, it was usually a matter of timing - and I had to determine why a quick read of the question caused me to make an error. More importantly, if I got the question wrong twice it was a matter of misunderstanding. I would then type in the beginning of the question stem into Google, which I believe(?) always lead me to a forum (can't remember whether PowerScore or 7Sage) of people discussing that specific question. More often than not someone made the same error I did for the same reason. Reading through the discussion consistently helped me understand where I went wrong, and how I could improve on similar questions. As mentioned, this strategy takes a while, but I believe leads to faster improvements, and less wasted study time. Anyway, this helped me quite a bit for LR. LG I was naturally good at and RC I'm shit at to this day. 

I self-studied though. Can't comment on how to efficiently navigate the courses. 

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I studied for the LSAT while working full-time. My commute to work was around an hour and a half each way, meaning that I had around 3-4 hours at the end of the day to study. After I had finished with prep book lessons (LSAT Trainer, PowerScore, LR Loophole — 1-2 lessons a night), I tried to do 1 timed section every night. On weekends, I would dedicate an entire day to taking a full PT and reviewing it, allowing me to take 1 day off. During my commute, I would drill LR questions on my phone using the LSAT Demon. It's certainly possible to study for the LSAT with a packed schedule, but it comes at the expense of having free time. 

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hi guys! sorry i didn't see all these posts thag got added I really appreciate all the advice though! Will definitely try doing my PTs a little different probably gonna download the LSAT demon :)

thanks again everyone we got this!! 

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I got a similar situation. I am self-employed and take time to look after that, while taking a full course load (5 courses/semester) in an quantitative program (accounting), where I am in all core courses; no "GPA-boosting" electives. My last LSAT write this previous November: I only scored 150; but, I only had time to start studying for it in the second week of October. I only had went back to school since COVID-19 (March) and have enough money to last so long, hence the tight timeline and course load. I have commitments and a mortgage and other bills to pay; it costs me about $4,500/month just to survive. This plus tuition, exam fees, etc. My next write is Jan. 2021, and I simply do not have the spare time to wait another whole year to be admitted (2022 Sep. as opposed to 2021). 

What I've realized is you got to play the best with the cards you're dealt with.

e.g. I can't change my life circumstances to give myself more time.

I have learned to maximize time efficiency. For example, learning how to best use your study time vs. just looking to study as much as possible. This can be strategically placing yourself physically in the right places, at the right times where your performance is at its peak. Or, strategically skipping or skimming other readings in your coursework that is not expected to net much higher returns in higher grades. I also learned to anticipate a certain marking "style" certain instructors use, particularly in essay/report-type submissions. By being more efficient at these activities, I've produced results (grades) with less effort and time. These factors have helped me gain more time to focus on other particulars, such as LSAT.

My second lesson was the waste of time of Khan Academy. I spent 5-10 hours each day on it from 2nd week of October up to the Nov. 2020 LSAT, only to get a 150. Then I realized I should had not been cheap on day 1 and shelled out for 7Sage. What happened was that I did the questions so many times that I became good at doing the particular questions it kept pumping out, but there was only so many of them. Turns out Khan Academy was developed in collaboration with LSAT, so I should had known that it was not in their best interest to engineer a program to maximize test-taker performance on their own exam, aside from giving you a preview on what the LSAT is.

Edited by FirstGear
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I was in a similar situation. 

I was doing undergrad full-time and working 2 part-time jobs while self-studying for the LSAT.  If I could offer three tips it would be: 

1. Take a practice test cold so you have a sense of what you already have an aptitude for and what you don't. 

2. Create a study schedule that extends all the way to your intended exam date and takes into account your strengths and weaknesses. That way your study schedule is as efficient as you can make it. I found that having a planned-out schedule helped minimize any anxiety I felt about potentially not getting through all the materials in time.

3. Focus more on practice questions and tests. But this approach's effectiveness will vary from person to person. For me, that was the best way I learned. So, in actuality, I didn't read ALL the material. I skimmed through a big chunk of it.  

Basically my approach to LSAT studying looked something like this

Good luck!

 

 

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Thanks everyone! I really appreciate all the support and hearing how much everyone else has had on their plates while studying for the LSAT gives me hope :)

@FirstGear thanks for sharing and for your great advice, sometimes we just gotta make the most of what we have.  Totally agree with you about 7sage I love that site! I use Khan Academy because the site forces me to be more disciplined about timing as opposed to setting timers on my phone which I may choose to ignore etc. 

@gg092 thank you so much for laying out your strategy so clearly! It really helps! Like you, I found practice to be really helpful for me  - nothing beats 40 minutes of drilling questions to train yourself to think like a lawyer.  It's been a couple weeks since my last quality study session with finals and all, but I've taken some time off over the holidays so back to the routine! 

Once again thank you everyone! 

 

 

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