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Is taking the LSAT for the first time in January for applications this cycle too much of a risk? For reference, I will be applying to U of A, U of C, UBC, and UVic with the following:

cGPA ~3.75, L2 3.9. Never taken the LSAT before, but I have experience with standardized exams and have scored fairly well before.

I anticipate I will have quite a bit of time to study for the exam as I have already graduated. I am hoping to put in at LEAST 3 hours a day, but I could realistically manage ~8 hours most days.

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I don't think you have much of a choice if you plan to apply for this cycle. A couple of schools do accept the Feb LSAT, but I forget which.

In any case, with your GPA you wouldn't need an incredible LSAT score to get in at most of those schools. It's definitely doable.

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9 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

Putting all the eggs in one basket can't be wise.

The things is I'm not- I am applying to multiple other professional/masters programs. 

As @Musashi mentioned, I wouldn't need a phenonmal LSAT to get admitted into the schools I am applying for which I think helps my case

Regardless though, I am most concerned with the feasibility of studying for the January LSAT with the time I have left

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I don't believe any of your chosen schools will accept the February LSAT. I know that Dalhousie and Western (and others I'm sure) do though.

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2 hours ago, hellohi said:

The things is I'm not- I am applying to multiple other professional/masters programs. 

As @Musashi mentioned, I wouldn't need a phenonmal LSAT to get admitted into the schools I am applying for which I think helps my case

Regardless though, I am most concerned with the feasibility of studying for the January LSAT with the time I have left

Good luck

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On 11/14/2020 at 6:11 AM, hellohi said:

Is taking the LSAT for the first time in January for applications this cycle too much of a risk? 

If you're applying this cycle then taking the LSAT for the first time in January isn't a risk, it's your only option. 

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5 hours ago, LawBlaw2019 said:

If you're applying this cycle then taking the LSAT for the first time in January isn't a risk, it's your only option. 

I'm aware of this- the purpose of my post was to more so assess how realistic my objective is. Is it unheard of for people to start studying in November and than write in January?

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6 hours ago, hellohi said:

I'm aware of this- the purpose of my post was to more so assess how realistic my objective is. Is it unheard of for people to start studying in November and than write in January?

Certainly not unheard of. There are a lot of factors at play. A lengthier study period is typically recommended. I imagine most will not achieve their peak potential/score in two months. But you only have the time you have so just do your best. You may well have a high diagnostic and learn the test quickly. 

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13 hours ago, LawBlaw2019 said:

If you're applying this cycle then taking the LSAT for the first time in January isn't a risk, it's your only option. 

Wrong, Feb is also an option.

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1 hour ago, MountainMon said:

Wrong, Feb is also an option.

This is not the case for any of the schools mentioned by the OP.

OP: Some people write the LSAT with no study at all and get great scores. Others study for years and never get the score they need. Most fall somewhere in between.

The problem for you as you prepare, and for anyone else trying to advise you, is that none of us know where you will fall on that spectrum.

For what little it's worth, I had for less than 8 weeks last year between my decision to pursue Law School and my sole write in November. However, I only improved by 3 points from my initial PT to my actual score in that 8 weeks. All in LG, and realistically within a luck-based margin of error anyway.

So yes, there are some of us around here who've been in your shoes, but there's no way for us to know whether you'll have more or less success than (for example) me. Let's hope more! :)  

-GM

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1 minute ago, GrumpyMountie said:

This is not the case for any of the schools mentioned by the OP.

OP: Some people write the LSAT with no study at all and get great scores. Others study for years and never get the score they need. Most fall somewhere in between.

The problem for you as you prepare, and for anyone else trying to advise you, is that none of us know where you will fall on that spectrum.

For what little it's worth, I had for less than 8 weeks last year between my decision to pursue Law School and my sole write in November. However, I only improved by 3 points from my initial PT to my actual score in that 8 weeks. All in LG, and realistically within a luck-based margin of error anyway.

So yes, there are some of us around here who've been in your shoes, but there's no way for us to know whether you'll have more or less success than (for example) me. Let's hope more! :)  

-GM

Good catch, got this mixed up with another thread re: OLSAS schools. Grrr Mondays....

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I would personally take a timed diagnostic test to see where you land without studying (there's a free test on the LSAC website). I think its extremely doable to do well enough to get into a school with two months of studying, especially with your GPA and the amount of time you have to study. 

It really depends on the person, how well you learn, and your diagnostic score. 

Good Luck!

 

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I suggest you do take the Jan LSAT.

Worst case scenario, you score low, and do not get into a law school for 2021.

If you have not committed to any other graduate programs, then this puts you in a great position for the 2022 cycle. You will be able to learn from your experience, and figure out what you need to do to score better next time. 

Edit: You could take both the Jan and Feb if you wanted. (If the financial cost is acceptable to you).

Edited by SNAILS

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