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LSAT Multiple Attempts: U of T Considerations

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So I've heard different things about how U of T looks at multiple LSAT attempts. One admissions officer said that they look at the percentile of the raw score rather than the score itself; he said that we should not consider rewriting if we are in the 85th percentile or higher, because our raw score is unlikely to increase by THAT much and that having an 85th percentile or higher is probably good enough. 

I know U of T can see all your scores on file and does place emphasis on the highest score, as per their admissions website. However, I am at a loss at how U of T considers that highest score, as I keep hearing different things. For example, my first attempt was 162 (84th percentile), my second was 164 (89th percentile) and now I am attempting the LSAT once more. As you can see, I only had a 2 point increase in my raw score (but a 5 point increase in percentile rank, if that makes a difference). While U of T will supposedly emphasize my 164 (at this point, before my retake), does anyone know if this score will be perceived as pretty much in the realm of a 162 because I didn't improve that much? Or is a 164 a 164 in their eyes, regardless of past scores?

I'm nervous about having multiple attempts on file that don't necessarily have a super big jump in raw scores. 

If anyone could shed some light on this, it would be appreciated! 

Thanks!!

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U of T take the highest score.

Getting "nervous" will not do anything. You are still going to take the third attempt no matter what anyone says. 

Just relax and try your best.

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7 hours ago, BayStreetOrBust said:

I would agree with Luckycharm. I wrote twice as well - 160 and 163 - and still got in. 

What was your OLSAS B3 if you don't mind me asking?

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I wrote 3 times - 155, 161, 170. They see them all but put dramatic emphasis on the highest score. Who knows, showing significant improvement may even bolster your application (over 1 high score to begin with). 

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