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canada18

Is Law school really as hard as it seems

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1 hour ago, Mal said:

Basically zero group work. In all of law school I had a single course that had a partner for a paper/moot.

This is very different in the covid-era (might be university dependent), but at TRU we have weekly assignment's in groups, midterm assignments done in our groups (worth 30%), and other assignments required to do in groups. 

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22 hours ago, Firecracker said:

As someone who was also somewhat apprehensive of the "curve culture", this is all relieving to hear!

For many new law students I can imagine there is bit of a shock in a "big fish, little pond -> little fish, big pond" kind of way. Either that, or major bouts of impostor syndrome. Or both. Lol.

Discussions on "beating the curve" are intimidating when there's no definitive answer as to how. Personally, I feel like it's better to not think so hard about that and just try to do the best you can while utilizing the resources available to you. I'm not in law school yet, but that'll be my approach.

I'm really excited to meet my future classmates - which leads me to my actual question. Is there a lot of group work in law school, or is the work primarily solo? How different are the vibes in classes vs. clinics vs. moots?

For the most part, it's individual work, but some professors have their own preferences. For my 1L moot I had a partner for the factum and the moot itself, and I'm currently in a class that has a big project where I'm partnered up with another law student. Moots for credit are obviously also done with partners.

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20 hours ago, Schooliscool said:

This is very different in the covid-era (might be university dependent), but at TRU we have weekly assignment's in groups, midterm assignments done in our groups (worth 30%), and other assignments required to do in groups. 

When I was in 1L at TRU we had in-class group assignments for LAP and the occasional breakout groups for constitutional, crim, and property, but nothing substantial. It still came down to your individual exam. 

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22 hours ago, Mal said:

Basically zero group work. In all of law school I had a single course that had a partner for a paper/moot.

This really depends on your school and class choice. I had probably a half dozen group assignments and I have friends who had a lot more.

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On 11/3/2020 at 3:45 PM, canada18 said:

[...] it seems that a lot of people think that law school is hard and it is especially hard to get A's.

Curve culture has been, and will be, talked about ad nauseam. A's are hard to get because because of the curve, and because (as said above) the top students are brilliant. It's true that as a cohort, everyone's intelligent and capable, but this pales in comparison to those students who seem hard-wired to understand complex and intangible structures, systems, and can integrate and anticipate the public policy and philosophical implications of the content. The process separates the wheat from the chaff. 

First year law school is tough, but it's akin to first-year undergrad. You probably haven't studied the material before, the expectations are seemingly unclear, and you don't know what your lecturers are looking for. Part of the challenge is learning to reorient your approach and style of learning to match how you're evaluated. Some fair better than others. It's easier to adapt when you're 18 and don't know any different, but can be harder when you're older and have a pre-conceived notion of how things ought to be taught and evaluated.

That said, graduating isn't that hard. Hell, defaulting to CANs and being okay with Ds and Cs will get most out the door with their piece of paper. Getting articles with that kind of track record? Now that's a different story. 

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Easier than undergrad I think. The learning curve can be a bit of a bitch the first 2 months. But its not thaaat hard 

Edited by AJD19
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There is some group work, and in the Covid times, it is crap. 

The workload is intense, it is positively impossible to read everything. But iit is not hard to figure out what is important to know.

The hardest lesson for me to learn so far has been that the effort I put in is not rewarded, all that matters is what I can show on an exam. I know I am not working as hard as others but I am working much harder than some. It is completely demoralizing when someone comes in who hadn't put in the time but got lucky with hitting a good exam question they knew how to answer, or had a good set of notes. 

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On 11/3/2020 at 3:45 PM, canada18 said:

Hey Guys,

I was reading about law school online and it seems that a lot of people think that law school is hard and it is especially hard to get A's. What makes Law school so difficult and how can undergrad students prepare for it and know whats to come. 

Thanks 

 

IMHO, it's not hard, but it is a lot of work at times, and it's hard to get As, mostly because it's graded on a curve and you're (typically) competing against smart people.

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7 hours ago, JimmyMcGill said:

There is some group work, and in the Covid times, it is crap. 

The workload is intense, it is positively impossible to read everything. But iit is not hard to figure out what is important to know.

The hardest lesson for me to learn so far has been that the effort I put in is not rewarded, all that matters is what I can show on an exam. I know I am not working as hard as others but I am working much harder than some. It is completely demoralizing when someone comes in who hadn't put in the time but got lucky with hitting a good exam question they knew how to answer, or had a good set of notes. 

The hard work you are putting in will pay off, but not for several years.

If you compare yourself to others in law school, it will be demoralizing. Reality is some people will get As without doing much work. 

Try to keep perspective on the long term goal at play, and remember that you're incrementally working towards that goal everyday. 

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