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What NOT to add on Sketch/ABS

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Hey Im wondering if theres certain things I should NOT add on my Sketch

For example I am smart serve certified but do they really care about that

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For everything you think you might want to enter, ask yourself, "Would I care about this if I were an a law school admission committee?"

Do up to 4 entries for most relevant work experience, if you have any.

Then focus on significant life achievements.

Do not spam it with useless stuff.

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1 hour ago, SNAILS said:

Do up to 4 entries for most relevant work experience, if you have any.

This is pretty novel advice for this site, so I'm curious about what you've based it on? Insofar as we've heard from admissions committee members on the subject, it was to the contrary. And the OLSAS guide says that the sketch should be "comprehensive" and include "all activities" since high school.

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opinion on putting academic distinctions on ur sketch like latin honors? I have seen some people on here do it but no confirmation if its a good/bad idea. OLSAS says anything that is on ur transcript does not need a verifier which I assume means it also doesn't need to be put down e.g. a scholarship on ur transcript, but on my transcript my academic distinction is not listed. Thank you all :) 

Edited by Ontario

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On 10/30/2020 at 10:20 PM, whereverjustice said:

This is pretty novel advice for this site, so I'm curious about what you've based it on? Insofar as we've heard from admissions committee members on the subject, it was to the contrary. And the OLSAS guide says that the sketch should be "comprehensive" and include "all activities" since high school.

You are limited to 32 entries, I think. So OLSAS could not literally mean "ALL." I interpret "all" to mean "all activities that you feel are relevant." This interpretation is supported by the context of the words "all" and "comprehensive" in the OLSAS link you provided.

In my case, I included the job I currently have, the previous job I had for a couple of years, 10 years of contract work 2009 to 2019, and details on the business I run. I could have included another 12 jobs I have held in the last 15 years, but I did not. 

So for me:

Employment: 4 entries

Volonteer: 6 entries

EC: 2 entries (as it was a long time ago)

Awards: 2 entries

I do not know if I made the right choice in keeping my number of entries limited. I think I did. I also included a CV for all schools, and I referred to employment in all of my PSs and school submissions.

It will also make a difference if you are fairly new out of university. Less employment experience means less possible entries to EXCLUDE. Also, all your employment history would be recent.

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6 hours ago, SNAILS said:

It will also make a difference if you are fairly new out of university. Less employment experience means less possible entries to EXCLUDE. Also, all your employment history would be recent.

Right, I'd definitely agree with this. If someone is finishing up their first degree, and had different jobs in each summer and in 3/4 years of university, that's six jobs right there - and they should definitely list all of them, not cut it off at four.

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