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legallybrunette3

Will this year be more competitive than ever?

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People are not working so they have a lot of time to study. I imagine some people might have put off going with school closures. People out of jobs applying to law school and going for career change.

Will this make it a lot harder to get in this year? Or is your competitive range going to remain the same?

I know this is speculative, but it has got me worried

 

P.S. I'm sorry if this has been discussed before, I really tried to search and couldn't find. Please delete if it's a problem.

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Unfortunately trying to research this phenomenon just turns up a bunch of US articles and stats. Most discussion about this in a Canadian context is speculative.

In my opinion it's safe to assume that during an economic recession more people apply to law school. 

During the last recession, this effect took 2 years to be realized. In October 2010, there was a 20% increase in LSAT takers compared to October 2008, which was an all-time high.

A quote from the above article:

Quote

“There’s a bit of lag time between when people start to worry about the economy and when they get their applications going,” said Wendy Margolis, director of communications for the Law School Admission Council, which administers the L.S.A.T.

Now, this was from 10 years ago. That's not that long ago. I think there's a good argument that the "lag" will be much shorter, if not eliminated entirely, because people have experienced a recession before and would react more quickly this time around.

Here's another interesting (American) article on how this pandemic/recession impacts law school application numbers.

The most relevant part of this article reads:

Quote

When more people are unemployed, more people take the LSAT and apply to law school. During the Great Recession, the number of LSAT test-takers increased more than 20% from 2007 to 2009. Current LSAC data shows applications up only 0.4% from the 2019-2020 admissions cycle ending July 31, 2019, when they were 3.3% higher than the prior year. Before that, there was a sizeable "Trump bump" in law school applications from 2016 to 2018.

Many applicants reason that they can ride out a recession through three years of law school and enter a recovering job market. Law school is too expensive and time-consuming to simply serve as a fallback, but the timing may make sense for applicants genuinely interested in a legal career.

Ultimately, as much as Canada is similar to the US, we are also different in a lot of ways. Our economy is recovering differently than the US economy. A new law school just opened in Canada (Ryerson), which presumably would help ease the burden of a general increase of applications. 

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1 hour ago, MountainMon said:

I find it extremely unlikely that this year it will be "a lot harder" to get admitted.

Concerning my post. If you click on the second link I list, and go to Canadian applications, it lists only a handful of schools across Canada. Do they refer to Canadian law schools and their downfall in number of applications, or do they look at strictly the number of Canadian applications to american schools according to the Canadian school of origin?

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14 minutes ago, toastedguac said:

Concerning my post. If you click on the second link I list, and go to Canadian applications, it lists only a handful of schools across Canada. Do they refer to Canadian law schools and their downfall in number of applications, or do they look at strictly the number of Canadian applications to american schools according to the Canadian school of origin?

Frankly I'm still not even sure what that data is referring to - US law school apps made by Canadians? Total apps to Canadian law schools? it makes no sense to me. I originally thought it was Canadians applying to the USA (the T14/T15 in particular), but now I'm not so sure as the numbers seem quite high. 

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