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2 hours ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

Good to know. Thanks! What about the other schools? 

 

 

Canadian schools aren't really categorized by area of law. You can get good experience doing human rights work if the school has clinics that do pro bono work (or otherwise give you practical, relevant experience). The resident human rights organization around here is the Community Legal Assistance Society, which is staffed by lawyers and does excellent work.

That said, I said Allard is corporate-leaning because big firms advertise heavily to Allard students and the school benefits from being advertised to. You will know the name of big firms on the first week of orientation from all the firm-sponsored merchandise. Each of our classrooms bear the name of a big or mid-size firm (not even joking). There are countless events hosted by big firms during the year, which are endorsed by our Career Services Office, our UBC Law and Students Society, and the Allard Law and Business society. You'd have to live under a rock not to know who the big firms are.

If you really want to be immersed in a "social justice" school, my understanding is that UVic is more social justice leaning than Allard. But you probably should ask a UVic student about that since this is only hearsay for me as well.

 

Edited by Psychometronic

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13 minutes ago, CleanHands said:

So they say. Wait until they've gone through OCIs and see where people actually settle (as you rightly allude to). 2L exposes poseurs pretty quickly.

There are also people that change their minds based on a bit of experience with the law. Don't be so quick to judge.  

 

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Just now, conge said:

There are also people that change their minds based on a bit of experience with the law. Don't be so quick to judge.  

 

Yeah, there are people who do a file for LSLAP and interact with poor, uneducated people for the first time in their lives and realize they hate talking to people like that so they get a job with Stikes. That does not mitigate my judgement of them. :)

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24 minutes ago, PlatoandSocrates said:

I will be interesting to see if this changes. I’m a 1L now and I have yet to speak with one fellow first year who isn’t focused on social Justice work specifically (though I certainly haven’t spoken with all 200 of them). Most people I’ve talked to have explicitly stated that they’re not interested in corporate work (though imagine that’s at largely due to being starry-eyed first years, which I’m sure I’m guilty of as well). 
 

+1 on Lslap though. They take everyone who wants to volunteer and they do some very interesting work. I, on coincidence, haven’t gotten an interesting file to stick yet, but a number of classmates have been doing interesting work already, including human rights matters. 

Consistently, more than half of 2Ls participate in OCIs (conservative estimate). The CSO produces stats on this.

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5 minutes ago, CleanHands said:

Yeah, there are people who do a file for LSLAP and interact with poor, uneducated people for the first time in their lives and realize they hate talking to people like that so they get a job with Stikes. That does not mitigate my judgement of them. :)

Would it mitigate your judgment if the "Stikes" lawyer spent a lot of time also doing pro bono work, donating to worthy causes, and directing firm resources to help the less fortunate?  

I just don't think the world is so black and white. 

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5 hours ago, conge said:

Would it mitigate your judgment if the "Stikes" lawyer spent a lot of time also doing pro bono work, donating to worthy causes, and directing firm resources to help the less fortunate?  

I just don't think the world is so black and white. 

Becoming a lawyer (and particularly the kind of lawyer who is able to secure a biglaw job) means opening up a lot of doors and gaining access to a lot of potential ways to benefit society in very direct, tangible ways. What people choose to do with that opportunity says a lot about what they value.

Would my judgement be "mitigated?" Perhaps, depending on how sincere I felt their efforts were and how much it appeared to be for optics. But the judgement wouldn't be eliminated, because they still had a lot of options and chose to be a corporate mercenary. I frankly do view that with some degree of contempt (a contempt I do not feel towards average joes who just need to do what they can to make ends meet and did not have the same options).

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8 hours ago, CleanHands said:

Becoming a lawyer (and particularly the kind of lawyer who is able to secure a biglaw job) means opening up a lot of doors and gaining access to a lot of potential ways to benefit society in very direct, tangible ways. What people choose to do with that opportunity says a lot about what they value.

Would my judgement be "mitigated?" Perhaps, depending on how sincere I felt their efforts were and how much it appeared to be for optics. But the judgement wouldn't be eliminated, because they still had a lot of options and chose to be a corporate mercenary. I frankly do view that with some degree of contempt (a contempt I do not feel towards average joes who just need to do what they can to make ends meet and did not have the same options).

corporate mercenary? Lol ok, I guess the world is made up of “corporate mercenaries” and “social justice warriors” and no in between.

Edited by conge

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8 minutes ago, conge said:

corporate mercenary? Lol ok, I guess the world is made up of “corporate mercenaries” and “social justice warriors” and no in between.

I'm probably one of the least "woke" students at the Allard School of Law, but that doesn't change the fact that the people I'm referring to have chosen to represent Dow Chemical in contract disputes instead of single parents facing eviction. Sounds like I touched a nerve though.

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2 hours ago, CleanHands said:

I'm probably one of the least "woke" students at the Allard School of Law, but that doesn't change the fact that the people I'm referring to have chosen to represent Dow Chemical in contract disputes instead of single parents facing eviction. Sounds like I touched a nerve though.

Yeah, a bit of a nerve. I find myopic world views incredibly frustrating. 

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On 10/28/2020 at 6:09 PM, Firecracker said:

You've already defied many odds by killing it on your LSAT prep. While I too am an applicant and know nothing about the ins and outs of legal practice, I'm a firm believer in the power of grit. I'm cheering for you! If I were in your shoes I'd rather pursue my dream to the furthest extent I could and know that (even if it gets too tough later on) I gave it my best shot.

I'm also interested in human rights law. From what I've read in its description and seen of its past projects UBC's human rights clinic does seem catered more towards international law. In general though UBC advertises itself as being very social justice oriented, which appealed to me.

Just found out as of yesterday I will be on the deans term honor list for keeping an an avg of 4-4.5 gpa for the term. And another annotation for having a gpa between 3.5 to 4.5. Reasonably pleased. 

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