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I want to specialize in provincial human rights and employment law.

Does this school offer me that? I know it has a human rights clinic but it seems to be primarily about international law, not domestic.

 

 

Thanks

 

 

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Can you get in? A 3.3/158 isn't good enough for admission at UBC. 

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1 hour ago, Tagger said:

Can you get in? A 3.3/158 isn't good enough for admission at UBC. 

Maybe this isn't the right place for it, but the OP has also written:

"My work experience is VERY limited due to my learning disorders"

"working while in school is almost impossible to do"

"my working memory is in the 4th percentile."

"I was born with Non-verbal learning disorder and disgraphia"

At the risk of sounding offensive or at least insensitive...and fully expecting that I'll be jumped on for saying this...I recognize that there is value in having people with various lived experiences and perspectives in the legal profession, but @Wouldratherbealawyer I would highly recommend you consider a different career that is more suited to your aptitudes.

You've written that your conditions impair your writing ability, your memory and your ability to maintain a heavy workload. All of these are absolutely vital skills in the legal profession. Even with accommodations I think you would be in for an absolutely miserable time working as a lawyer. It's actually hard for me to think of a profession that sounds less suitable for you.

I can appreciate that this sucks, as law is basically my 4th or 5th career choice because I was medically disqualified from the careers I had initially wanted to do earlier in my life. And we shouldn't exclude people lightly for things they don't choose. But at a certain point one needs to question whether there are enough accommodations out there to make a given career work for a given individual.

Edited by CleanHands
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On 10/25/2020 at 9:46 PM, CleanHands said:

Maybe this isn't the right place for it, but the OP has also written:

"My work experience is VERY limited due to my learning disorders"

"working while in school is almost impossible to do"

"my working memory is in the 4th percentile."

"I was born with Non-verbal learning disorder and disgraphia"

At the risk of sounding offensive or at least insensitive...and fully expecting that I'll be jumped on for saying this...I recognize that there is value in having people with various lived experiences and perspectives in the legal profession, but @Wouldratherbealawyer I would highly recommend you consider a different career that is more suited to your aptitudes.

You've written that your conditions impair your writing ability, your memory and your ability to maintain a heavy workload. All of these are absolutely vital skills in the legal profession. Even with accommodations I think you would be in for an absolutely miserable time working as a lawyer. It's actually hard for me to think of a profession that sounds less suitable for you.

I can appreciate that this sucks, as law is basically my 4th or 5th career choice because I was medically disqualified from the careers I had initially wanted to do earlier in my life. And we shouldn't exclude people lightly for things they don't choose. But at a certain point one needs to question whether there are enough accommodations out there to make a given career work for a given individual.

And now I PT at a 160+ 

Having learning disorders makes it all so challenging but with the right tutoring even someone like myself can do this. And your right, this is like the oil to my water, but I have so far defied all other expectations, and so the dream lives on. 

Managed straight As in my last academic year and have 3 excellent references. So, I will take my chances. Things changed since that last post. 

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On 10/25/2020 at 10:46 PM, CleanHands said:

Maybe this isn't the right place for it, but the OP has also written:

"My work experience is VERY limited due to my learning disorders"

"working while in school is almost impossible to do"

"my working memory is in the 4th percentile."

"I was born with Non-verbal learning disorder and disgraphia"

At the risk of sounding offensive or at least insensitive...and fully expecting that I'll be jumped on for saying this...I recognize that there is value in having people with various lived experiences and perspectives in the legal profession, but @Wouldratherbealawyer I would highly recommend you consider a different career that is more suited to your aptitudes.

You've written that your conditions impair your writing ability, your memory and your ability to maintain a heavy workload. All of these are absolutely vital skills in the legal profession. Even with accommodations I think you would be in for an absolutely miserable time working as a lawyer. It's actually hard for me to think of a profession that sounds less suitable for you.

I can appreciate that this sucks, as law is basically my 4th or 5th career choice because I was medically disqualified from the careers I had initially wanted to do earlier in my life. And we shouldn't exclude people lightly for things they don't choose. But at a certain point one needs to question whether there are enough accommodations out there to make a given career work for a given individual.

I totally get where you're coming from with this, but I actually disagree. This individual has demonstrated that she is PT'ing much higher on her LSAT (a 158 still gets people accepted, though maybe not so much at UBC) and that they got all A's in their last semester. When it comes down to it if she's getting the stats required for admission it doesn't matter that she had to work extra hard for it. It might actually give her a huge advantage in working with clients with learning disabilities, maybe even employment law. just my two cents! 

Good luck @Wouldratherbealawyer !

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15 hours ago, legallybrunette3 said:

I totally get where you're coming from with this, but I actually disagree. This individual has demonstrated that she is PT'ing much higher on her LSAT (a 158 still gets people accepted, though maybe not so much at UBC) and that they got all A's in their last semester. When it comes down to it if she's getting the stats required for admission it doesn't matter that she had to work extra hard for it. It might actually give her a huge advantage in working with clients with learning disabilities, maybe even employment law. just my two cents! 

Good luck @Wouldratherbealawyer !

I'm a guy but thank you. This is my thoughts. I am doing a lot better then before. I hired a tutor that specializes in NLD and it's doing wonders. Went 22/23 on LG. Not the -10 or so I always use to go. Things have gone so well I might be able to tutor in the LSAT and have a buisness on the side. And, if not for chronic pain, part time would have been possible. 

Edited by Wouldratherbealawyer
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16 hours ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

-Snip-

 

15 hours ago, legallybrunette3 said:

-Snip-

@Wouldratherbealawyer - You know yourself and your own abilities better than I, as a stranger on the internet, do. I don't mean to belabor the point and I wish you the best and I hope you prove my concerns wrong.

With that said, all I will add is that the LSAT doesn't engage that much with the points of concern that I raised, while legal practice absolutely does. The LSAT is more about raw processing ability--you answer a question as quickly as possible, move on to the next one, and repeat (although I do see how issues with working memory could to some extent impair one in the logic games and reading comprehension sections, but not as much as it would in various legal practice contexts). I don't think you're stupid and never suggested that I did.

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27 minutes ago, CleanHands said:

 

@Wouldratherbealawyer - You know yourself and your own abilities better than I, as a stranger on the internet, do. I don't mean to belabor the point and I wish you the best and I hope you prove my concerns wrong.

With that said, all I will add is that the LSAT doesn't engage that much with the points of concern that I raised, while legal practice absolutely does. The LSAT is more about raw processing ability--you answer a question as quickly as possible, move on to the next one, and repeat (although I do see how issues with working memory could to some extent impair one in the logic games and reading comprehension sections, but not as much as it would in various legal practice contexts). I don't think you're stupid and never suggested that I did.

Never thought you meant that. You were actually quite polite about it. I see barriers, but until they become unmanageable I've wanted this for over a decade and will push on. But your right and I will have to figure out some unique accommodations. Thankfully I live in Canada with one some of the strongest human rights protections on Earth for people with learning disorders. But your points are valid, and I've thought about them for a while but I see some possible solutions.  

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You've already defied many odds by killing it on your LSAT prep. While I too am an applicant and know nothing about the ins and outs of legal practice, I'm a firm believer in the power of grit. I'm cheering for you! If I were in your shoes I'd rather pursue my dream to the furthest extent I could and know that (even if it gets too tough later on) I gave it my best shot.

I'm also interested in human rights law. From what I've read in its description and seen of its past projects UBC's human rights clinic does seem catered more towards international law. In general though UBC advertises itself as being very social justice oriented, which appealed to me.

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Not sure I can totally answer your question, as I'm currently in the app cycle as well, but UBC is my top choice and I'm hoping to do domestic human rights or public/criminal law of some sort. My understanding is that UBC is well regarded and a big enough school that there will be a wide variety of opportunities available. I'm also a big believed that just because something isn't what most people are doing at a given institution, you can definitely still carve your own path! I've done my undergrad at Queen's Commerce and am a bleeding heart socialist hippie with a passion for nonprofit work and social justice - found ways to focus my degree around that despite being surrounded by investment bankers!!

Also, having read some comments on this post I just wanted to say huge kudos to you for all your hard work. Nothing speaks louder than grit. Wishing you all the best with your applications!!

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8 hours ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

I'm a guy but thank you. This is my thoughts. I am doing a lot better then before. I hired a tutor that specializes in NLD and it's doing wonders. Went 22/23 on LG. Not the -10 or so I always use to go. Things have gone so well I might be able to tutor in the LSAT and have a buisness on the side. And, if not for chronic pain, part time would have been possible. 

my bad! I didn't even realize I assumed your gender there!

But I admire your attitude and the fact that you know what you want. I don't think anyone, even A+ students with 180 LSAT's truly know if they have what it takes for this career until they're neck deep in it.

 

Edited by legallybrunette3
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There's plenty of opportunity to take human rights files through LSLAP. It's not difficult to get into LSLAP as a 1L, basically you just need to sign up.

The International Justice and Human Rights clinic doesn't do domestic human rights work. As stated above, their focus is on big international stuff. I don't know how this translates to a post law-school career (especially without connections to people in high places), but their work is very different from domestic human rights work.

I disagree with the sentiment that Allard "advertises" itself as social justice oriented. More recently, there is a growing cohort of students interested in social justice work, but Allard heavily leans towards corporate-commercial.

Edited by Psychometronic

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7 hours ago, Firecracker said:

You've already defied many odds by killing it on your LSAT prep. While I too am an applicant and know nothing about the ins and outs of legal practice, I'm a firm believer in the power of grit. I'm cheering for you! If I were in your shoes I'd rather pursue my dream to the furthest extent I could and know that (even if it gets too tough later on) I gave it my best shot.

I'm also interested in human rights law. From what I've read in its description and seen of its past projects UBC's human rights clinic does seem catered more towards international law. In general though UBC advertises itself as being very social justice oriented, which appealed to me.

I've got chronic pain too, lots of reasons my dreams end up crushed but until they do I'll keep on pushing. As far we all know it's a single life, so, why choose something I would only be content with if I am lucky enough to have the chance to have it? A loss to me will be when willpower fails to my lack of talent and other abilities some are born with. Willpower seems to be enough so far, so hopefully that holds true for law too. 

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6 hours ago, Psychometronic said:

I disagree with the sentiment that Allard "advertises" itself as social justice oriented. More recently, there is a growing cohort of students interested in social justice work, but Allard heavily leans towards corporate-commercial.

Really? I had no idea. My bad for misleading - based on the J.D program description online that's how they came off to me, but obviously I've never gone to school there.

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6 hours ago, Firecracker said:

Really? I had no idea. My bad for misleading - based on the J.D program description online that's how they came off to me, but obviously I've never gone to school there.

Good to know. Thanks! What about the other schools? 

 

 

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16 hours ago, Psychometronic said:

I disagree with the sentiment that Allard "advertises" itself as social justice oriented. More recently, there is a growing cohort of students interested in social justice work, but Allard heavily leans towards corporate-commercial.

I will be interesting to see if this changes. I’m a 1L now and I have yet to speak with one fellow first year who isn’t focused on social Justice work specifically (though I certainly haven’t spoken with all 200 of them). Most people I’ve talked to have explicitly stated that they’re not interested in corporate work (though imagine that’s at largely due to being starry-eyed first years, which I’m sure I’m guilty of as well). 
 

+1 on Lslap though. They take everyone who wants to volunteer and they do some very interesting work. I, on coincidence, haven’t gotten an interesting file to stick yet, but a number of classmates have been doing interesting work already, including human rights matters. 

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1 minute ago, PlatoandSocrates said:

I will be interesting to see if this changes. I’m a 1L now and I have yet to speak with one fellow first year who isn’t focused on social Justice work specifically (though I certainly haven’t spoken with all 200 of them). Most people I’ve talked to have explicitly stated that they’re not interested in corporate work (though imagine that’s at largely due to being starry-eyed first years, which I’m sure I’m guilty of as well). 

So they say. Wait until they've gone through OCIs and see where people actually settle (as you rightly allude to). 2L exposes poseurs pretty quickly.

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1 minute ago, CleanHands said:

So they say. Wait until they've gone through OCIs and see where people actually settle (as you rightly allude to). 2L exposes poseurs pretty quickly.

Yeah I figured this would be largely the case. But for how vocal everyone’s been it will be interesting to see who walks the talk. Much respect for everyone, of course, regardless of which direction they take. For my part I have no idea what practice area to go into yet, bleeding heart, ruthless corporate, or otherwise (which, after social Justice, seems to be the second place area of interest at this point). 

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Just now, PlatoandSocrates said:

Much respect for everyone, of course, regardless of which direction they take. 

Disagreed. :P

Just now, PlatoandSocrates said:

For my part I have no idea what practice area to go into yet, bleeding heart, ruthless corporate, or otherwise (which, after social Justice, seems to be the second place area of interest at this point). 

I can respect people who are at least honest about that though.

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