Jump to content
Wouldratherbealawyer

What about this school is different?

Recommended Posts

I am trying to limit my schools down to 6 and was consider eliminating this school but, kept on reading that it's 'different' then other law schools in Canada without any specific examples as to how.

Saying your different does not make you different, that is not how the word 'different' works in the English language, so what about this school is different?

I've got learning disorders and considered that this school might be good but without any specifics, I am leaning on not choosing this school.

Anyone know?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I’ve heard is that they integrate practical curriculum through intensives or more hands-on courses, and I believe the integration of these skills allows graduates to bypass articling. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Toby1994 said:

One thing I’ve heard is that they integrate practical curriculum through intensives or more hands-on courses, and I believe the integration of these skills allows graduates to bypass articling. 

So it's not just online? or mostly? 

Please specify this might change my mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

21 hours ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

Saying your different does not make you different, that is not how the word 'different' works in the English language

Thanks for clarifying how different works in the english language 🙏  . Wasn't really sure tbh

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Syndicate03 said:

 

Thanks for clarifying how different works in the english language 🙏  . Wasn't really sure tbh

 

Look sometimes you got to, cause people don't know ahaha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

Look sometimes you got to, cause people don't know ahaha

Just checked your previous posts. What is your OLSAS GPA ? IS your highest LSAT still 158?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Luckycharm said:

Just checked your previous posts. What is your OLSAS GPA ? IS your highest LSAT still 158?

I'm retaking the LSAT this Nov - expecting a 160 or so. And I qualify for access category 3 different ways. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

So it's not just online? or mostly? 

Please specify this might change my mind.

I believe that it’s mostly online because of the pandemic...like the majority of schools in the country. Obviously in September 2021, classes could be in person (dear god I hope so) or remain online. This year’s “intensives” or more practical curriculum might be online or in person, I don’t know as I’m a 0L like you. I think the main benefit of Ryerson offering the intensives is that graduates can skip their articling year. That’s one component of their program that sets them apart from most other Canadian Law schools. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Toby1994 said:

I believe that it’s mostly online because of the pandemic...like the majority of schools in the country. Obviously in September 2021, classes could be in person (dear god I hope so) or remain online. This year’s “intensives” or more practical curriculum might be online or in person, I don’t know as I’m a 0L like you. I think the main benefit of Ryerson offering the intensives is that graduates can skip their articling year. That’s one component of their program that sets them apart from most other Canadian Law schools. 

I should clarify, I got this after watching  a 2019 video about how online would be integrated. I will delay until I can go in person - my learning disorders will make this hard enough, online is usually much harder. 

How would class structure look like once in person classes start up again? Thus how were they before? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Wouldratherbealawyer said:

I should clarify, I got this after watching  a 2019 video about how online would be integrated. I will delay until I can go in person - my learning disorders will make this hard enough, online is usually much harder. 

How would class structure look like once in person classes start up again? Thus how were they before? 

I would ask this question on the “1Ls how’s it goin?” thread instead of this one. You’d be more likely to reach current students who might be able to give you some insight, although they may not have been told what the plans are if next year classes start up again. Best of luck! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only aspect that seems significantly different to me is that they make students take technology based courses. Including a coding course (forget if this was just an example used or this is required course). I spoke to a rep from Ryerson Law during one of the LSAC virtual law school forums who told me all this.

Plus, I believe something about this is included in the questions for PS. She also added that you can be a complete beginner when it comes to these courses. However, that is what deterred me from applying as I do not want to take a coding course. Anyways, I think them being different comes from them "a new kind of legal education is required to equip the lawyers of the 21st century. Our innovative program includes a focus on hands-on learning, financial literacy, equity and access to justice and mentorships."

Edited by aishxxxx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I'm a current student and I can answer some concerns/questions in this thread.

1) There is not "coding course". There is sort of computer literacy intensive (1 week) in 2L. It will teach us how to use software commonly found in legal practice. You'd be surprised about what people do and don't know about Microsoft office.

2) The "hands on" component does not require in person attendance. This component is covered in tutorials. These tutorials cover skills and topics that most students don't learn until they've begun to work either in the summer or during articles. Other law schools will focus only on theory in class, while Ryerson ALSO incorporates skills such as contract negotiation.

Tutorials are in ADDITION to the typical course load. Your class schedule at Ryerson will be more intense. There are also assignments which is again not typical and makes Ryerson's schedule more demanding. When I say more demanding I'm referring purely to hours spent in class and on assignments. I am NOT referring to the intellectual rigour of Ryerson courses. The content of our classes is fairly standard in that regard. Our professors have taught at law schools across Canada.

3) Everything is online this year due to the pandemic. Those "hands-on" skills aren't physically "hands-on".

4) Admissions are holistic. The admissions committee told us they watched our interviews before they looked at any of our statistics. That interview is your first impression and an important part of your application.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think having tutorials is only at Ryerson. At Windsor law, there is also tutorials for every class ( 6 courses per semester and there is 1 intensive) on top of class/lecture 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/6/2020 at 12:58 PM, stz2 said:

I don't think having tutorials is only at Ryerson. At Windsor law, there is also tutorials for every class ( 6 courses per semester and there is 1 intensive) on top of class/lecture 

Yeah, most (not all) of our courses here at Osgoode also have a tutorial component, in addition to a main class/lecture for the week. Contracts is an exception that comes to mind, as rather than a lecture and a tutorial the course has two lecture periods alloted for it per week. 

Edited by LabouriousCorvid
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi! Current Ryerson 1L here. Yes, most law schools also have tutorials. From my understanding, what sets Ryerson's tutorials apart is they are taught by lawyers who are currently practicing. Rather than discuss course content in tutorials, the practitioners facilitate activities and assignments where we learn practical skills normally reserved for articling students. Some of these activities including writing a contract for our Contracts class, creating a lease agreement for Property, or writing a factum for our Legal Research and Writing Class. 

Just wanted to offer some clarity! 

Edited by applesauce
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Everyone

Current Ryerson 1L here as well, adding in my 2 cents.

Further to what applesauce mentioned, the tutorials shouldn't be titled as such - they're more like labs. They don't discuss much of the readings (and often times have their own assigned readings) nor do they discuss lecture material.

They basically just say "okay, go answer this legal question" or "write an opinion to this client"... and yes, it's as vague and terrifying as it sounds 🤣. But it's generally not graded, and contributes to participation. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • Lived experience is the result of infinitely different possibilities. To say that one trait - skin colour - is the ultimate determinant of being able to understand something is absurd when there are a million different factors involved. I didn't state that my hypothetical took place in North America and would agree with your point. 
    • Taking bets as to how long until this post gets locked.  I see a lot of presumably white posters arguing that they can understand why diversity might be important to non-white applicants. I think that this is basically good natured. I also think that there is a difference in understanding something intellectually and understanding something from the perspective of lived experience, understanding it viscerally. White folks by and large have never felt what it's like not to belong by virtue of the colour of their skin and as such might be able to conceptually grasp why POC might prefer a diverse atmosphere, but can't really understand it at the level of lived experience.  I also see a lot of posts either directly belittling the value of diversity in law school or obliquely dismissing it as being an important concern. I'd ask you lot to put yourselves in the shoes of non-white applicants, trying to crack their way into a traditionally white dominated field and consider how  valuable it might be to not just see white faces in your classroom. Creating a sense of belonging in a field attracts a larger quantity of talented applicants who can deliver high quality legal services. I also think that Diplock is right. While the demographics of legal practice are surely changing, some really great job opportunities might require POC to enter un-diverse spaces. Just because this sucks doesn't make it not true. And like I've posted before, having that information in your back pocket makes means that you're armed with the tools to make prudent decisions. 
    • You guys are all talking past each other now. 
    • You can understand why, but without lived experiences, it is difficult to understand how much weight this would have on any individual racialized person and how it factors into their decision-making process. I would also add that being the only white person in a room full of POCs in North America is different from being the only POC in a room full of white people in North America.
    • Back on the main topic, it's worth your time to look into recent initiatives by law schools too; Western has historically not been great on diversity, but the admin and student body are very engaged on this, especially in light of the current uptick in BLM advocacy and conversations in the law school. Admissions has committed to increased emphasis on overall class diversity and there are multiple initiatives on campus broadly and in the law school specifically to address this. I'm sure other law schools are doing the same. Food for thought! 

×
×
  • Create New...